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Apathy: prevalence, associated factors, and prognostic value among frail, older inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124530
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2012 Jul;13(6):541-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Eeva H Hölttä
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Jouko V Laurila
Timo E Strandberg
Reijo S Tilvis
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Unit of General Practice and City of Helsinki, Health Center, Helsinki, Finland. eeva.holtta@hel.fi
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2012 Jul;13(6):541-5
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apathy
Delirium - mortality - psychology
Dementia - mortality - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly - psychology
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Prevalence
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The association of apathy with Alzheimer disease and other dementias and caregiver burden has been examined in a number of studies; however, less is known about its relationship with delirium and mortality. We aimed to investigate the prevalence, relationship with delirium and dementia, and prognostic value of apathy in an elderly and frail inpatient population.
The cohort included 425 patients in acute geriatric wards and in 7 nursing homes in Helsinki (1999-2000). Demographic factors, physical functioning, diagnoses, and drugs were assessed with special reference for dementia, delirium, and apathy. Mortality was registered from central registers.
Of the patients, 98 (23.1%) suffered from apathy, and it was more frequent among men (32% versus 21% women, P = .037 ). There was no difference in mean age, number of comorbidities, or in the mean number of medications between those with and without apathy; however, those with apathy had lower mean MMSE points (9.2 versus 14.0 without apathy, P
PubMed ID
22572553 View in PubMed
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Association of Self-Rated Health in Midlife With Mortality and Old Age Frailty: A 26-Year Follow-Up of Initially Healthy Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284814
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jul;71(7):923-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Emmi Huohvanainen
Arto Y Strandberg
Sari Stenholm
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Reijo S Tilvis
Timo E Strandberg
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jul;71(7):923-8
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Primary Prevention - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the relationship between self-rated health (SRH) in healthy midlife, mortality, and frailty in old age.
In 1974, male volunteers for a primary prevention trial in the Helsinki Businessmen Study (mean age 47 years, n = 1,753) reported SRH using a five-step scale (1 = "very good," n = 124; 2 = "fairly good," n = 862; 3 = "average," n = 706; 4 = "fairly poor," or 5 = "very poor"; in the analyses, 4 and 5 were combined as "poor", n = 61). In 2000 (mean age 73 years), the survivors were assessed using a questionnaire including the RAND-36/SF-36 health-related quality of life instrument. Simplified self-reported criteria were used to define phenotypic prefrailty and frailty. Mortality was retrieved from national registers.
During the 26-year follow-up, 410 men had died. Frailty status was assessed in 81.0% (n = 1,088) of survivors: 434 (39.9%), 552 (50.7%), and 102 (9.4%) were classified as not frail, prefrail, and frail, respectively. With fairly good SRH as reference, and adjusted for cardiovascular risk in midlife and comorbidity in old age, midlife SRH was related to mortality in a J-shaped fashion: significant increase with both very good and poor SRH. In similar analyses, average SRH in midlife (n = 425) was related to prefrailty (odds ratio: 1.52, 95% confidence interval: 1.14-2.04) and poor SRH (n = 31) both to prefrailty (odds ratio: 3.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.16-10.9) and frailty (odds ratio: 8.38, 95% confidence interval: 2.32-30.3) in old age.
SRH in clinically healthy midlife among volunteers of a primary prevention trial was related to the development of both prefrailty and frailty in old age, independent of baseline cardiovascular risk and later comorbidity.
PubMed ID
26774116 View in PubMed
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Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease--a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140239
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kaisu H Pitkala
Minna M Raivio
Marja-Liisa Laakkonen
Reijo S Tilvis
Hannu Kautiainen
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, PO Box 20, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@kolumbus.fi
Source
Trials. 2010;11:92
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - economics - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Caregivers
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Day Care - economics
Depression - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy - economics
Finland
Frail Elderly
Health Care Costs
Humans
Independent living
Mobility Limitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Postural Balance
Quality of Life
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD.
During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210) living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1) tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2) group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3) control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36). Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up.
To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention.
ACTRN12608000037303.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20925948 View in PubMed
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Porvoo sarcopenia and nutrition trial: effects of protein supplementation on functional performance in home-dwelling sarcopenic older people - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106182
Source
Trials. 2013;14:387
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mikko P Bjorkman
Merja H Suominen
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Harriet U Finne-Soveri
Reijo S Tilvis
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Helsinki, PO Box 340, 00029 HUS Helsinki, Finland. mikko.bjorkman@helsinki.fi.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:387
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Test
Exercise Therapy
Finland
Frail Elderly
Gait
Geriatric Assessment
Hand Strength
Humans
Independent living
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Sarcopenia - diagnosis - diet therapy - mortality - physiopathology - psychology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Age-related muscle loss (that is, sarcopenia) is a common health problem among older people. Physical exercise and dietary protein have been emphasized in prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Rigorous trials investigating the effects of protein supplementation on physical performance in sarcopenic populations are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of protein supplementation along with simple home-based exercises on physical performance among home-dwelling sarcopenic older people.
During 2012 the entire 75 and older population (N = 3,275) living in Porvoo, Finland was contacted via a postal questionnaire. Persons at risk of sarcopenia are screened with hand grip strength and gait speed. Poorly performing persons are further examined by segmental bioimpendance spectroscopy to determine their skeletal muscle index. Sarcopenic patients (target N = 250) will be enrolled in a 12-month randomized controlled trial with three arms: 1) no supplementation, 2) protein supplementation (20 grams twice a day), and 3) isocaloric placebo. All the participants will receive instructions on simple home-based exercises, dietary protein, and vitamin D supplementation (20 µg/d). The recruitment of patients will be completed during 2013. The primary endpoint of the trial is the change in short physical performance battery score and percentage of patients maintaining or improving their physical performance. Secondary endpoints will be, among other things, changes in muscle functions, nutritional status, body composition, cognition, quality of life, use of health care services, falls, and mortality. The assessment times will be 0, 6, 12 and 24 months.
To our knowledge, this is the first large scale randomized controlled trial among community dwelling older people with sarcopenia that focuses on the effects of protein supplementation on physical performance.
ACTRN12612001253897, date of registration 28 October 2012, first patient was randomized 11 April 2012.
Notes
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Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1982 Jun;140:566-727104545
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1989 Aug;37(8):725-92754157
Cites: Neurology. 1989 Sep;39(9):1159-652771064
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PubMed ID
24225081 View in PubMed
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Prognostic significance of delirium in frail older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176774
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2005;19(2-3):158-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kaisu H Pitkala
Jouko V Laurila
Timo E Strandberg
Reijo S Tilvis
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Geriatric Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@hus.fi
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2005;19(2-3):158-63
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - mortality
Comorbidity
Delirium - diagnosis - mortality
Female
Finland
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Geriatrics
Homes for the Aged
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nursing Homes
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Our aim was to investigate the long-term prognosis of delirium in the frailest elderly, and to clarify whether delirium is just a marker of the underlying severe disease. We used logistic regression analysis to determine the independent prognostic significance of delirium. A representative sample of 425 patients (> or = 70 years) in acute geriatric wards and nursing homes were assessed at baseline and followed up for 2 years. DSM-IV was used for classification. The prevalence of delirium at baseline was 24.9% (106/425). The prognosis of delirium was poor: mortality at 1 year was 34.9 vs. 21.6% in nondelirious subjects (p = 0.006), and at 2 years 58.5 vs. 42.6% (p = 0.005). Among home-dwelling people at baseline, 54.4% of the delirious vs. 27.9% of others were permanently institutionalized within 2 years (p
PubMed ID
15627764 View in PubMed
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Use of inappropriate medications and their prognostic significance among in-hospital and nursing home patients with and without dementia in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169108
Source
Drugs Aging. 2006;23(4):333-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Minna M Raivio
Jouko V Laurila
Timo E Strandberg
Reijo S Tilvis
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Author Affiliation
Department of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University of Helsinki, Finland. minna.raivio@phnet.fi
Source
Drugs Aging. 2006;23(4):333-43
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Dementia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization Review
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Marital status
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Patients - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although the Beers criteria have been frequently utilised to describe the use of inappropriate medications in various elderly populations, less is known about the use of such medications among patients with dementia, and nor have many studies dealt with their impact on mortality or use of healthcare services. This study examines the use of inappropriate drugs and their impact on mortality and use of health services among Finnish elderly nursing home and hospital patients. Patients with dementia were studied as a special subgroup.
A total of 425 patients consecutively admitted to seven Finnish nursing homes and two hospitals in 1999-2000 were examined. Details of all medications prescribed and administered were retrieved from medical records and coded according to the Beers 1997 criteria. Mortality data as well as days in acute hospital were obtained from central registers and all area hospitals during 2 years of follow-up.
The entire population was old and frail (mean age 86 years, 82% females), 60% had dementia and 36.2% received at least one potentially inappropriate drug (PID). No differences existed in the proportion of users of PIDs among those 60% of patients with dementia compared with those without. The most common PID was temazepam, with 14% of all patients on high doses. Other commonly used PIDs were oxybutynin and dipyridamole. Amitriptyline was more commonly used among patients without dementia (4.7%) compared with those with dementia (0.8%). Nevertheless, in this very old and frail study population, use of inappropriate drugs did not predict mortality or use of health services.
Use of PIDs is common in nursing homes and hospitals in Finland but has no impact on mortality or hospital admissions. Use of high-dose temazepam as a hypnotic accounted for most of the high use of PIDs.
PubMed ID
16732692 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.