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ACE genotype and physical training effects: a randomized study among elderly Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49706
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Henrik Frederiksen
Lise Bathum
Charlotte Worm
Kaare Christensen
Lis Puggaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Epidemiology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. hfrederiksen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;15(4):284-91
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomechanics
Body Composition
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Frail Elderly
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Oxygen consumption
Patient Selection
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Walking - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The level of physical functioning (PF) late in life has, in recent years, been shown to be influenced by genetic factors. One of the most extensively studied genetic variants associated with PF and trainability is insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the gene encoding Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE). However, ACE studies have mainly been conducted among younger persons in excellent physical shape. In this study, we examine whether the level of PF, trainability, or rate-of-change are associated with the ACE genotype among the elderly. METHODS: We used data from 4 randomized training studies of elderly Danes (N = 203). The measures of PF were self-report, maximal oxygen uptake, muscle strength, walking speed, and body composition. RESULTS: Overall, a favorable change in the measures of PF was observed in training groups compared with control groups. However, within groups, neither pre- or post-training/control period levels of PF nor differences in pre- and post-levels were associated with the ACE genotype. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our randomized studies, we could not detect any association between the ACE genotype and the level of PF or change, regardless of whether response to physical training or spontaneous changes was studied.
PubMed ID
14661817 View in PubMed
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Acute hospital use, nursing home placement, and mortality in a frail community-dwelling cohort managed with Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123476
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ted Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia and Island Medical Program, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. trosenberg@gem-health.com
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Demography
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Nursing Homes - utilization
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of medical Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home (PIECH) on acute hospital use and mortality in a frail elderly population.
Comparison of acute hospital care use for the year before entering the practice (pre-entry) with the most-recent 12-month period (May 1, 2010-April 30, 2011, postentry) for active and discharged patients.
Community.
All 248 frail elderly adults enrolled in the practice for at least 12 months who were living in the community and not in nursing homes in Victoria, British Columbia.
Primary geriatric care provided by a physician, nurse, and physiotherapist in participants' homes.
Acute hospital admissions, emergency department (ED) contacts that did not lead to admission, reason for leaving practice, and site of death.
There was a 39.7% (116 vs 70; P = .004) reduction in hospital admissions, 37.6% (1,700 vs 1,061; P = .04) reduction in hospital days, and 20% (120 vs 95; P = .20) reduction in ED contacts after entering the practice. Fifty participants were discharged from the practice, 64% (n = 32) of whom died, 20% (n = 10) moved, and 16% (n = 8) were admitted to nursing homes. Fifteen (46.9%) deaths occurred at home.
Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home may reduce acute hospital admissions and facilitate home deaths.
PubMed ID
22694020 View in PubMed
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Addressing the health needs of frail elderly people: Ontario's experience with an integrated health information system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168728
Source
Age Ageing. 2006 Jul;35(4):329-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
John P Hirdes
Source
Age Ageing. 2006 Jul;35(4):329-31
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Public Health Informatics
Systems Integration
Notes
Comment On: Age Ageing. 2006 Jul;35(4):434-816540491
PubMed ID
16788076 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of nutrient intake among elderly persons receiving home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154657
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2008;27(1-2):65-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
C Shanthi Johnson
Monirun Nessa Begum
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. shanthi.johnson@uregina.ca
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2008;27(1-2):65-82
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Ontario
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This study examines the adequacy of the dietary intake based on age, sex, and level of nutritional risk among 98 frail elderly persons receiving home care through Community Care Access Centres. The dietary intakes were measured using 24-hour recalls and were compared with the dietary reference intake. The participants' intakes of both macronutrients and micronutrients were found to be inadequate. On average, elderly persons were consuming more than the recommended amount of protein, but the average intakes of many vitamins and minerals were less than optimal based on the average intakes. Paradoxically, more than half of elderly participants were overweight or obese. The results highlight the need for appropriate nutrition, education, and support for elderly persons receiving home care.
PubMed ID
18928191 View in PubMed
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Admission criteria in short-term geriatric assessment units: a Delphi study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184394
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jul-Aug;94(4):310-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Charo Rodríguez
Marie-Jeanne Kergoat
Judith Latour
Paule Lebel
André-Pierre Contandriopoulos
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Area of Health Services and Policy Research, 515-517, Pine Avenue, Room 10, Montreal (Quebec) H2W 1S4. charo.rodriguez@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jul-Aug;94(4):310-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Delphi Technique
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Hospital Units - utilization
Humans
Patient Admission - standards
Patient Selection
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
In recent years, short-term geriatric care units that operate using an interdisciplinary approach have been established in Quebec and elsewhere, in order to provide frail elderly persons with better health care. The purpose of this study is to determine criteria that target the greatest number of individuals most likely to benefit from hospitalization in this type of care unit.
A Delphi survey was conducted. The panel of experts consisted of 54 physicians and nurses working in short-term geriatric care units in Quebec. Three questionnaires were mailed and 4-level Likert scales were used. Median values, and 25th and 75th percentiles to a maximum of 2, were chosen a priori as the definition of consensus.
The survey used 14 inclusion criteria and 17 exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were divided into two categories and exclusion criteria were divided into four.
A typical clinical profile of a patient who should be admitted to a STGCU emerges: an elderly person presenting multiple pathologies, acute or sub-acute functional disability, and often related psychosocial problems. The instrument developed by this project is a practical guide for professionals in STGAUs as well as those responsible for allocating resources in the health care system.
PubMed ID
12873093 View in PubMed
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Aging, disability, and frailty: implications for universal design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82456
Source
J Physiol Anthropol. 2006 Jan;25(1):113-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Crews Douglas E
Zavotka Susan
Author Affiliation
Departments of Anthropology and Consumer Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43201, USA. Crews.8@osu.edu
Source
J Physiol Anthropol. 2006 Jan;25(1):113-8
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropology, Physical - methods
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Environment Design - trends
Forecasting
Frail Elderly
Humans
Needs Assessment
World Health
Abstract
Throughout the world all populations are seeing burgeoning numbers of "elders", defined as persons aged 65 year and older. In many countries, including Japan, the United States, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom, those aged over 65 are at or approaching 15% of the population. As their numbers have increased, so have their health care expenses, leading to extensive research on the health, well being, and life expectancy of these increasingly older elders. Today this group is further sub-divided: the young-old ages 65-74, the old-old ages 75-84, and the oldest-old ages 85+, for both health care and research purposes. However broad variation still characterizes even these groupings. Rates of frailty and disability increase with increasing age among these elders. For example, inabilities to complete at least one activity of daily living increased from about 5-7% at ages 65-69 years to about 28-36% at ages 85+ in 1987. Death rates continue to decline at all ages past 50 years and rates of disability seem to be doing the same. For the foreseeable future, we may expect increasing numbers of older, frail elders than in previous decades. Thus, people are not only living longer, they generally are healthier at advanced ages than were previous cohorts, thus "old age" disabilities of the 20th century will be put off to even older ages during the 21st century. As yet there is no clear way to assess senescent changes in humans, although activities of daily living, allostatic load, and frailty indices have all been suggested. One future need is greater development and use of universal and accessible design in all aspects of the built environment.
PubMed ID
16617216 View in PubMed
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Alcohol withdrawal at home. Pilot project for frail elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212064
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 May;42:937-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
D J Evans
S D Street
D J Lynch
Author Affiliation
Victoria Innovative Seniors Treatment Agency (VISTA), BC.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 May;42:937-45
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Alcoholism - prevention & control
British Columbia
Case Management - organization & administration
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Social Support
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
Abstract
The need for safe, accessible, client-centred, alcohol withdrawal services for seniors was recognized by health service workers in Victoria. A partnership of health and support service organizations developed and implemented a pilot project for treating alcohol withdrawal in the home. The project provided service that integrated well with a substance-abuse treatment program for seniors.
Notes
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Cites: Br J Addict. 1990 Jan;85(1):61-702310855
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PubMed ID
8688696 View in PubMed
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Analgesic use and frailty among community-dwelling older people: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117548
Source
Drugs Aging. 2013 Feb;30(2):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Marjaana P H Koponen
J Simon Bell
Niina M Karttunen
Irma A Nykänen
Franciska A M Desplenter
Sirpa A Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. marjaana.koponen@uef.fi
Source
Drugs Aging. 2013 Feb;30(2):129-36
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pain Measurement
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Frail older people have a decreased ability to respond to stressors and may therefore be more susceptible to adverse events related to inadequately treated pain. Conversely, aging- and frailty-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may predispose frail older people to adverse events of analgesics.
The aim of this study was to explore whether analgesic use is associated with frailty status and whether there are differences in the types of analgesics used between frailty groups among community-dwelling older people.
The study population consisted of 605 community-dwelling people aged >75 years. Demographic, diagnostic and drug use data were collected during standardized nurse interviews. Participants were classified as frail, pre-frail or robust using the Cardiovascular Health Study frailty criteria (weight loss, weakness, exhaustion, slowness and low physical activity).
Overall, 11.4 % (n = 69) of the study participants were frail and 49.4 % (n = 299) were pre-frail. The prevalence of prescription and non-prescription analgesic use was higher among frail (68.1 %) than among pre-frail (54.5 %) and robust (40.5 %) older people (p
PubMed ID
23288603 View in PubMed
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481 records – page 1 of 49.