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24 records – page 1 of 3.

[Ankle joint fractures as athletic injuries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244265
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Aug 19;78(34):2855-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-1981

[Characteristic of combat trauma and treatment of gunshot fractures of long bones of the limbs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184139
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2003 May;324(5):4-12, 80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
N A Efimenko
V M Shapovalov
A K Dulaev
A M Baranovskii
V P Retunskikh
P A Ivanov
A V Dydykin
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2003 May;324(5):4-12, 80
Date
May-2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bones of Upper Extremity - injuries - surgery
Fracture Fixation
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Hospitals, Military
Humans
Leg Bones - injuries - surgery
Medical Records
Military Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Military Personnel
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Transportation of Patients
War
Wounds, Gunshot - surgery
Abstract
Treatment of the patients with gunshot fractures of extremity long bones is one of the main problems of field surgery. The complex study of medical records obtained from 718 servicemen with gunshot fractures of extremity long bones who participated in counter-terrorist operation in the Republic of Chechnia (1994-1996) allowed to evaluate character and severity of the injuries, content of the treatment measures conducted at the stages of medical evacuation. The peculiarities of fighting trauma were the following: the high frequency of combined (22.5%) and multiple (25.9%) injuries, the high share of multi-fragmentation and splintered (76.4%), intra-articular fractures (17.3%), the primary defects of bones (7.1%) and soft tissues (4.8%), the injuries of main vessels (12.1%) and nerves (18.5%). Owing to the short periods of evacuation to the stage of specialized medical care (up to 18.2 +/- 5.3 h), high share of preserving variant of primary surgical treatment (82.3%); high quality of medical immobilization at the expense of wide introduction of functionally stable external osteosynthesis (51.2% of the casualties) it was possible to improve the treatment results.
PubMed ID
12908396 View in PubMed
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Completeness and data validity for the Danish Fracture Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106944
Source
Dan Med J. 2013 Oct;60(10):A4712
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Kirill Gromov
Jakob V Fristed
Michael Brix
Anders Troelsen
Author Affiliation
Ortopædisk Afdeling, Hvidovre Hospital, 2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. kirgromov@yahoo.dk.
Source
Dan Med J. 2013 Oct;60(10):A4712
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Fractures, Open - surgery
Fractures, Spontaneous - surgery
Humans
Internet
Quality of Health Care
Registries - standards
Abstract
Fracture-related surgery is among the most common orthopaedic procedures. However, to our knowledge, register-based quality assessment of fracture-related surgery has not previously been conducted. The Danish Fracture Database (DFDB) has been developed for the purpose of web-based quality assessment, but its properties as a valid data source have not previously been explored. We therefore investigated: 1) the completeness of data in the DFDB, and 2) if the entered data are valid data sources for future quality assessment.
We have developed the internet-based DFDB in which data entry is performed by the surgeon. Data collection includes primary fracture surgery and reoperations. After full implementation of the database at two orthopaedic departments, we assessed the completeness and validity of the entered data for 322 patients operated during a one-month period. Validity was calculated as observed agreement.
We recorded 83% completeness for all types of data entry, with 88% completeness for primary fracture surgery and 77% for reoperations, respectively. Patient- and trauma-related data were 82-100% valid. Surgery-related data included method of osteosynthesis and was valid in 89-99% of the cases.
The DFDB is an easy to use web-based database for registration of fracture-related surgery. Shortly after its implementation, we recorded satisfactory completeness and high data validity, which makes the DFDB a valuable tool with potential for nationwide quality assessment of fracture-related surgery.
PubMed ID
24083526 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 8;168(19):1844-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-2006
Author
Lausten Gunnar Schwarz
Jensen Claus Munk
Olsen Bo Sanderhoff
Author Affiliation
Amtssygehuset i Herlev, Ortopaedkirurgisk Afdeling, Herlev. gusl@herlevhosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 8;168(19):1844-7
Date
May-8-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - surgery
Arthroplasty, Replacement - instrumentation - methods
Elbow Joint - injuries - radiography - surgery
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Humans
Joint Prosthesis
Prosthesis Design
Abstract
Each year, about 80 elbow arthroplasties are performed in Denmark. Approximately two thirds are done due to rheumatoid arthritis, the others due to comminuted fractures of the elbow, especially in elderly patients. The prosthesis is fixed with or without bone cement, and there are two different types of elbow prostheses: linked, in which the humerus and ulna are connected by a sloppy hinge, and non-linked, in which stability is dependent on the soft tissues of the elbow. Good pain relief can be expected, but the range of motion will usually be permanently affected.
PubMed ID
16756798 View in PubMed
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High complication rate after syndesmotic screw removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276379
Source
Injury. 2015 Nov;46(11):2283-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Mette Renate Andersen
Frede Frihagen
Jan Erik Madsen
Wender Figved
Source
Injury. 2015 Nov;46(11):2283-7
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ankle Injuries - surgery
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Bone Screws - microbiology
Cephalothin - administration & dosage
Device Removal - adverse effects - methods
Female
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications - microbiology - prevention & control
Preoperative Care
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology - prevention & control
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Surveys and Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications after routine syndesmotic screw removal.
All patients who underwent syndesmotic screw removal at our hospital between 2007 and 2012 were included in the study. Patient demographics, surgical characteristics, radiographic evaluation and complications were recorded from the patients' charts. Questionnaires were sent by postal mail to all patients, to measure patient satisfaction and pain (VAS scales).
161 patients were included in the trial. A wound infection was found in 8 (5%) patients. 3 were regarded as serious infections requiring hospitalisation and intravenous antibiotics, 2 of those required surgical revisions. 5 patients were treated by oral antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus was identified as the causing organism in all (6/8) cases with a positive culture. The patients with postoperative infection reported more pain (5.3 vs. 2.3; p=0.02) and were less satisfied (4.7 vs. 7.6; p=0.014) with their ankle compared to those without infection (T-test for independent samples).
There were 5% wound infections after routine syndesmotic screw removal. Routine antibiotic prophylaxis effective against S. aureus should be administered when removing syndesmotic screws. In our institution we now use one single dose Cefalotin of 2g intravenously 30-60min before screw removal.
PubMed ID
26319204 View in PubMed
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Incidence of cancer among patients with knee implants in Sweden, 1980-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13953
Source
Cancer. 2002 Jun 1;94(11):3057-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2002
Author
Jon P Fryzek
Weimin Ye
Lisa B Signorello
Loren Lipworth
William J Blot
Joseph K McLaughlin
Olof Nyren
Author Affiliation
International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA. fryzek@iei.ws
Source
Cancer. 2002 Jun 1;94(11):3057-62
Date
Jun-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - surgery
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Knee Prosthesis
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Osteoarthritis - surgery
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: As knee implants become more common, it is important to study their potential health risks. We investigated cancer occurrence in a nationwide population-based cohort of 30,011 patients who underwent knee replacement surgery in Sweden from 1980 to 1994. METHODS: Patients were followed from 1 year after the date of their surgery through December 31, 1995, accruing 122,616 person-years of observation. The average follow-up time was 4.3 years, with 2365 patients followed for 10 years or more. RESULTS: Overall cancer incidence was not elevated compared with the general population of Sweden (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.98-1.08). A reduced rate for all respiratory cancers (SIR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.59-0.91) and for lung cancer (SIR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.58-0.91) was found among both men and women. Elevated rates were found for prostate (SIR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.06-1.34) and bone cancer (SIR = 6.00; 95% CI = 1.24-17.52) in men. The bone cancer excess was based on three observed cases, two of which occurred at a site unrelated to the implant and the site of the third tumor is unknown. Rates of connective tissue cancer and leukemia-lymphoma were not elevated significantly among knee implant recipients. Long-term follow-up (>or= 10 years) did not show a significant excess risk for all cancer (SIR = 1.10; 95% CI = 0.86-1.38) or for any site-specific cancer, including bone cancer, lymphoma, or leukemia. Subgroup analyses for patients with rheumatoid arthritis produced results similar to the overall results. CONCLUSIONS: This epidemiologic study of cancer risk among patients with knee implants is the largest to date. It provides evidence that the incidence of cancer among patients with knee implants is similar to that of the general population. Continued follow-up of this cohort is warranted to evaluate further potential long-term effects of these implants.
PubMed ID
12115397 View in PubMed
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Incorporation of titanium mesh in orbital and midface reconstruction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188791
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2002 Sep 15;110(4):1022-30; discussion 1031-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2002
Author
Warren Schubert
Andrew J L Gear
Chen Lee
Peter A Hilger
Erhard Haus
Mark R Migliori
Dean A Mann
Charles I Benjamin
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Regions Hospital, Saint Paul, MN, USA.
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2002 Sep 15;110(4):1022-30; discussion 1031-2
Date
Sep-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Diseases - surgery
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - complications
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Humans
Nose Diseases - surgery
Nose Neoplasms - complications
Orbit - injuries
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Soft Tissue Injuries - etiology - surgery
Surgical Mesh
Titanium
Wounds, Gunshot - surgery
Abstract
Several authors have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of titanium in orbital reconstruction. One question posed by clinicians is what happens to large pieces of titanium in communication with the paranasal sinuses or nasal-oral-pharyngeal area. This question becomes increasingly relevant as titanium is used to reconstruct extensive defects for which the destruction of bony architecture requires the placement of mesh in proximity to these areas. The objective of this study was to examine the gross and histologic soft-tissue response to large segments of titanium mesh in the setting of orbital and midface reconstruction, particularly when exposed to the nasal-oral-pharyngeal area and paranasal sinuses. In this study, large segments of titanium mesh were used in eight patients to reconstruct orbital and midface defects, with direct communication between the mesh and nasal-oral-pharyngeal area and paranasal sinuses. Four patients had suffered self-inflicted gunshot wounds; as a result, much of their midface was missing, including the inferior and medial orbital floor, maxilla, nose, naso-orbital-ethmoid complex, and hard palate. Extensive sheets of titanium mesh were used to reconstruct their medial and inferior orbital walls, nasal bridge, and maxilla. In the fifth patient, titanium mesh was used to reconstruct the maxilla after resection of a squamous cell carcinoma of the nasolacrimal duct. In the sixth and seventh patients, mesh was used to reconstruct the nasal bridge after severely comminuted nasal fractures resulted in the loss of bone and mucosa. Finally, the eighth patient had titanium mesh used to replace cocaine-induced bone loss involving the left medial orbital floor and wall and part of the maxilla. On gross examination by either endoscopy or direct inspection, all eight patients had rapid soft-tissue incorporation of the titanium mesh. Initial examination typically revealed budding of soft tissue through mesh interstices, followed by progressive incorporation. One patient's mesh was covered in only 15 days. Two patients underwent biopsies of this newly formed soft tissue. One had biopsies performed at 3, 15, and 31 months after the original operation. Biopsy examination at 3 months revealed incorporation of the titanium with fibrous soft tissue covered by ciliated respiratory epithelium, goblet cells, and squamous epithelium with metaplasia. In addition, the dense, acute inflammation present at 3 months evolved into mild, chronic inflammation at 31 months. The second patient had a single biopsy 4 months after secondary orbital reconstruction for delayed enophthalmos. Biopsy examination revealed a fibrous soft-tissue sheath lined by squamous epithelium with metaplasia. Again, mild chronic inflammation was present within the soft tissue. This study provides evidence of titanium's compatibility with soft tissue. The mesh underwent progressive incorporation with soft tissue that was then resurfaced by indigenous cells, including respiratory epithelia and goblet cells. This phenomenon occurred despite communication with the nasal-oral-pharyngeal area and paranasal sinuses.
PubMed ID
12198411 View in PubMed
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[It should not be necessary for elderly patients with fractures to wait for surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200904
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Aug 11;96(32-33):3406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-1999
Author
U. Lindsjö
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Aug 11;96(32-33):3406
Date
Aug-11-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - economics
Fractures, Bone - surgery
Fractures, Spontaneous - surgery
Health Priorities
Humans
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1999 Dec 15;96(50):560910643222
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1999 Aug 25;96(34):351210492551
PubMed ID
10479793 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.