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A 6-year exercise program improves skeletal traits without affecting fracture risk: a prospective controlled study in 2621 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259943
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1325-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Fredrik Detter
Björn E Rosengren
Magnus Dencker
Mattias Lorentzon
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Magnus K Karlsson
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1325-36
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Accelerometry
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - pathology - physiopathology - radiography
Case-Control Studies
Child
Exercise - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Most pediatric exercise intervention studies that evaluate the effect on skeletal traits include volunteers and follow bone mass for less than 3 years. We present a population-based 6-year controlled exercise intervention study in children with bone structure and incident fractures as endpoints. Fractures were registered in 417 girls and 500 boys in the intervention group (3969 person-years) and 835 girls and 869 boys in the control group (8245 person-years), all aged 6 to 9 years at study start, during the 6-year study period. Children in the intervention group had 40 minutes daily school physical education (PE) and the control group 60 minutes per week. In a subcohort with 78 girls and 111 boys in the intervention group and 52 girls and 54 boys in the control group, bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm(2) ) and bone area (mm(2) ) were measured repeatedly by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measured bone mass and bone structure at follow-up. There were 21.7 low and moderate energy-related fractures per 1000 person-years in the intervention group and 19.3 fractures in the control group, leading to a rate ratio (RR) of 1.12 (0.85, 1.46). Girls in the intervention group, compared with girls in the control group, had 0.009?g/cm(2) (0.003, 0.015) larger gain annually in spine BMD, 0.07?g (0.014, 0.123) larger gain in femoral neck bone mineral content (BMC), and 4.1?mm(2) (0.5, 7.8) larger gain in femoral neck area, and at follow-up 24.1?g (7.6, 40.6) higher tibial cortical BMC (g) and 23.9?mm(2) (5.27, 42.6) larger tibial cross-sectional area. Boys with daily PE had 0.006?g/cm(2) (0.002, 0.010) larger gain annually in spine BMD than control boys but at follow-up no higher pQCT values than boys in the control group. Daily PE for 6 years in at study start 6- to 9-year-olds improves bone mass and bone size in girls and bone mass in boys, without affecting the fracture risk.
Notes
Comment In: J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1322-424764102
PubMed ID
24390777 View in PubMed
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The 21st-century landscape of adult fractures: cohort study of a complete adult regional population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268491
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Mar;30(3):535-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Björn E Rosengren
Magnus Karlsson
Ingemar Petersson
Martin Englund
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Mar;30(3):535-42
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
History, 21st Century
Humans
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent reports on adult fracture epidemiology have focused mainly on the hip in the elderly, in whom increasing rates lately have changed to a decline. New reports of the preponderance of nonhip fractures in health expenditure call for a wider scope. We therefore examined current overall and site-specific fracture epidemiology in adults. We ascertained all fractures diagnosed in inpatient and outpatient care in all men and women aged 20 years or older in Skåne County, Sweden, from 1999 to 2010 (10 million person-years). For each fracture type, we estimated age-specific and sex-specific rates and evaluated potential time trends. We found 205,908 fractures yielding an overall fracture rate of 192 per 10,000 person-years. The age-standardized overall fracture rate increased by 1.2 per 10,000 and year (95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.5), but time trends were different for different fracture types, age strata, and for men and women. For example, in both women and men aged =50 years the rates of proximal humerus fracture increased (0.6 and 0.2 per 10,000 and year, respectively) while hip fracture rates declined (-1.0 and -0.3 per 10,000/year, respectively). Overall age-specific number of fractures increased with age in women but was stable in men. The increasing overall fracture rate is a major concern in the context of a growing and aging population. Effective and affordable preventive strategies and treatments should be an urgent priority to meet the challenges, especially in older women in whom most fractures occur. Comprehensive current detailed data, as provided in this study, may serve as reference for projections and for cost calculations of fracture care in other settings before results of similar examinations are available there.
PubMed ID
25280349 View in PubMed
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Accidental falls and related fractures in 65-74 year olds: a retrospective study of 332 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198241
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
E. Nordell
G B Jarnlo
C. Jetsén
L. Nordström
K G Thorngren
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. eva.nordell@ort.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Documentation
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Postural Balance
Referral and Consultation
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated, by studying medical records, background factors and consequences of accidental falls of patients 65-74 years who attended the Department of Orthopedics' emergency clinic in Lund. We also assessed possible prevention measures. Fractures occurred in three quarters of the registered falls. Women were more prone to sustain fractures than men. Forearm fractures were commonest among women while hip fractures were commonest among men. One third of the patients were admitted to an orthopedic ward because of the fall. The patients who were less healthy had sustained fractures oftener and also needed more hospital care. Information regarding risk factors for falls and fractures were often missing in the patients' medical records. Impaired walking and balance, and medication increased the risk of falls. Such patients constitute a high risk group for future falls and fractures. A newly developed instrument is suggested as a routine in the emergency department to increase the awareness of risk factors for falls in the elderly. Satisfactory documentation is a prerequisite for further treatment and referrals to prevent falls and fractures.
PubMed ID
10852324 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental injury is a serious risk in children with typical absence epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14288
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
E C Wirrell
P R Camfield
C S Camfield
J M Dooley
K E Gordon
Author Affiliation
IWK-Grace Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - physiopathology
Burns - epidemiology
Child
Comparative Study
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy, Absence - complications - physiopathology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Medical Records
Near Drowning - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine if young adults with a history of typical absence epilepsy (AE) in childhood have a greater risk of accidental injury than controls with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). To assess the nature and severity of these injuries. METHODS: All patients with AE or JRA diagnosed between 1977 and 1985, who were 18 years or older at the onset of the study, were identified from review of pediatric electroencephalographic records for the province of Nova Scotia (AE) or review of the medical records database at the only tertiary care pediatric center for the province (JRA). Fifty-nine (86%) of 69 patients with AE and 61 (80%) of 76 patients with JRA participated in an interview in 1994 or 1995, assessing nature, severity, and treatment of prior accidental injuries. Patients with AE were further questioned about injuries sustained during an absence seizure. RESULTS: Sixteen (27%) of 59 patients with AE reported accidental injury during an absence seizure, with risk of injury being 9% per person-year of AE. Most injuries (81%) occurred during anti-epileptic drug therapy. Although the majority of injuries did not require treatment, 2 (13%) of 16 patients required minor treatment and 2 (13%) of 16 were admitted to hospital. The risk of accidental injury resulting from an absence seizure in person-years at risk was highest in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (45%), moderate in juvenile AE (14%), and lowest in childhood AE (3%). Patients with AE had a greater number of overall accidental injuries than those with JRA (P
Notes
Comment In: Arch Neurol. 1997 Sep;54(9):10639311348
PubMed ID
8815859 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative analysis of the chest injuries in different types of traumatic exposure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208773
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1997 Apr-Jun;40(2):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
V I Gaivoronskaia
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1997 Apr-Jun;40(2):36-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Rupture
Russia - epidemiology
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Abstract
A total of 200 death cases from various injuries are analyzed using the files of the Kaliningrad Bureau of Forensic Medical Expert Evaluation over 1991-1992. Chest injuries were found to occur most often in men aged 31 to 40. The predominant lesions are abrasions, hemorrhages in soft tissues, rib fractures, and lung injuries.
PubMed ID
9254452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute and long-term increase in fracture risk after hospitalization for stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195446
Source
Stroke. 2001 Mar;32(3):702-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
J. Kanis
A. Oden
O. Johnell
Author Affiliation
Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases (World Health Organization Collaborating Center), University of Sheffield Medical School (UK). w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk
Source
Stroke. 2001 Mar;32(3):702-6
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Abstract
The aims of this study were to determine the magnitude of the increase in fracture risk after hospitalization for stroke, and in particular to determine the time course of this risk.
The records of the Swedish register of patients admitted during 1987-1996 were examined to identify all patients who were admitted to the hospital for stroke. Patients were followed for subsequent hospitalizations for hip and all fractures combined. We analyzed 16.3 million hospitalizations, from which 273 288 individuals with stroke were identified. A Poisson model was used to determine the absolute risk of subsequent fractures and the risk compared with that of the general population.
After hospitalization for stroke, there was a >7-fold increase in fracture risk, including that for hip fracture within the first year after hospitalization for stroke. Thereafter, fracture risk declined toward, but did not attain, the baseline risk except in men and women aged >/=80 years.
The high incidence of new fractures within the first year of hospitalization for stroke suggests that such patients should be preferentially targeted for treatment. It is possible that short courses of treatment at the time of stroke would provide important therapeutic dividends.
PubMed ID
11239190 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Jun;8(3):145-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
M. Fahlström
U. Björnstig
R. Lorentzon
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic, University Hospital of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Jun;8(3):145-8
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achilles Tendon - injuries
Adolescent
Adult
Ankle Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Racquet Sports - injuries
Retrospective Studies
Rupture
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During 1990-1994, 1.2% of all sports injuries that required emergency care at the University Hospital of Umeå were caused by badminton. In 90.7% of the cases the patients described themselves as recreational players or beginners. There were 51.3% minor injuries (AIS 1) and 48.7% moderate injuries (AIS 2). The lower extremities were affected in 92.3% of the cases. Achilles tendon ruptures (34.6%) and ankle sprains and fractures (29.5%) were the most frequent. By the time of the follow-up (10-69 months), 52.6% of the players still had symptoms from the injuries and 39.5% had not been able to return to playing badminton. Our data indicate the importance of adequate treatment and rehabilitation after acute badminton injuries.
PubMed ID
9659674 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute soccer injuries in Finland in 1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239085
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1985 Mar;19(1):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985
Author
J. Sandelin
S. Santavirta
O. Kiviluoto
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1985 Mar;19(1):30-3
Date
Mar-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Athletic Injuries - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dislocations - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Health
Leg Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Soccer
Sports
Abstract
The present investigation analyses all the acute soccer injuries recorded in Finland during one year (1980). The mean follow-up time was 18 months. The calculated yearly injury incidence was 5.8%. No significant difference in the injury incidences between the two sexes could be detected. A major part, 64% of the injuries were located in the lower extremities. Fractures and dislocations accounted for 11% of all injuries. One quarter of the injuries were classified as mild, causing a playing disability shorter than a week. Most injuries occurred through physical contact with another player (p less than 0.001). The calculated median time of absence from practice after injury was 4 weeks.
Notes
Cites: Ann Chir Gynaecol Fenn. 1966;55(3):176-805958671
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 1973 Nov;20(4):837-494584745
Cites: Duodecim. 1975;91(11):714-81204512
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1977 Nov-Dec;5(6):241-2563179
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 1978 Mar;12(1):43-5630182
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1978 Nov-Dec;6(6):354-732779
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1980 Mar-Apr;8(2):106-137361974
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1980 Sep-Oct;8(5):325-77416349
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1980 Nov-Dec;8(6):411-47435757
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1981 Nov-Dec;9(6):384-97316020
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1984 Aug;66(4):500-36746681
Cites: J Assoc Phys Ment Rehabil. 1964 Sep-Oct;18:130-414206415
PubMed ID
3995226 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute sports injuries in Oslo: a one-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39779
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1984 Sep;18(3):181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1984
Author
S. Maehlum
O A Daljord
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1984 Sep;18(3):181-5
Date
Sep-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ankle Injuries
Arm Injuries - epidemiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Contusions - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Leg Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Abstract
All sport injuries treated at the Emergency Department, Ullevål Hospital in Oslo (OKL) were registered for one year. They accounted for 6.3% of the total number of patients treated at OKL in that period. 4673 patients were seen; 3292 males and 1381 females. The women were younger than the men, 55% were below 20 years of age; 41% of the males (p less than 0.05). Most of the men (64%) were injured in connection with competitive sports, but 52% of the women sustained their injury pursuing recreational sports. Football and skiing accounted for 49% of the total number of injuries. In males football caused most injuries--35%. In females handball accounted for most injuries--18%. Nearly 3/4 of the injuries affected the extremities; the most common injury being the ankle sprain (16%). Almost 1/4 of the patients had a fracture, and 218 patients (4.7%) were admitted to hospital, the rest being treated as outpatients. In all, the sports injuries required 7658 consultations.
PubMed ID
6435714 View in PubMed
Less detail

412 records – page 1 of 42.