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Blood alcohol levels in a series of injured patients with special reference to accident and type of injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251547
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1976;65(4):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
R. Honkanen
T. Visuri
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1976;65(4):287-94
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Accidents, Home
Accidents, Occupational
Accidents, Traffic
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - blood
Ethanol - blood
Female
Finland
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Blood alcohol was determined in 1012 injury victims. It was found that the alcohol involvement (AI) rate was 37% in the total number of patients, 19% in industrial, 38% in traffic, 36% in home, 45% in other freetime accidents, and 69% in the victims of fights, assaults, and suicide attempts. The most common external cause of injury was falling (447 cases) with an AI rate of 38%, while the 172 other nontraffic true accident cases had a rate of 24%. The road and stairs were the usual places of falls while intoxicated. Head injuries had a high (47%) and upper extremity injuries a low (25%) AI rate. Tibial and ankle fractures were also very often associated with alcohol intake. Contrarily to traffic and industrial accidents the slightly injured at home and in other freetime environments had been drinking more frequently than the severely injured. The data suggest that alcohol is a powerful contributing factor in leisure-time injuries. Head and low leg are especially vulnerable in drunken persons. Not only driving but even when walking while intoxicated means taking risks.
PubMed ID
970907 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
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[Comparative characteristic of serpin--alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in human and mice serum]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18211
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2003 Apr;89(4):420-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
T A Korolenko
O A Levina
O V Falameeva
Z S Tolochko
V K Spiridonov
E M Andreeva
S I Il'nitskaia
V I Kaledin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physiology, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Russian Acad. Sci., Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2003 Apr;89(4):420-6
Date
Apr-2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Leg Injuries - blood
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred Strains
Neoplasms, Experimental - blood
Sex Factors
Species Specificity
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - metabolism - physiology
Abstract
Serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor have been studied in human subjects and in mice of different lines as acute phase reactant and during tumor development. In humans, there was no difference of serpin activity between men and women. Increased activity was noted in men with acute trauma (acute phase reaction). Comparatively to male, in female mice of different lines decreased activity of serum alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor, was shown. There was no increase of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activity during inflammation induced by zymosan administration in mice. alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor belongs to acute phase reactants in humans but not in mice; for mice alpha-2-macroglobulin is a more typical acute phase reactant as compared to alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor. Murine tumor development (hepatoma HA-1, lymphosarcoma LS, Lewis lung adenocarcinoma) was followed by a decreased activity of serum alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor both in successfully treated and untreated groups. According to data of literature, similar dated were obtained in humans with tumors. It was suggested that changes of expressiln of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor by tumors and its secretion were involved in decreased activity of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor.
PubMed ID
12966719 View in PubMed
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Does thyroid function influence fracture risk? Prospective data from the HUNT2 study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107290
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Dec;169(6):845-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Anders Svare
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Bjørn Olav Asvold
Siri Forsmo
Berit Schei
Trine Bjøro
Arnulf Langhammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Dec;169(6):845-52
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Density
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - blood - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Radius Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Thyroid Function Tests
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Thyrotropin - blood
Ulna Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
To prospectively study the relation between TSH and risk of hip and forearm fractures.
A population-based cohort study.
In a substudy of the second survey of the Nord Trøndelag Health Study, Norway (HUNT2, 1995-97), linked with a hospital-based fracture registry, we investigated the relation between baseline TSH and risk of hip and/or forearm fractures.
A total of 16?610 women and 8595 men aged 40 years or more, without previous self-reported thyroid disease and hip or forearm fractures.
During 12.5 years follow-up, a total of 1870 women and 342 men experienced hip or forearm fractures. Overall, there was no relation between baseline TSH and fracture risk. However, there was weak evidence that women with TSH 3.5?mU/l had a slightly increased risk of hip fractures (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30, 95% CI 0.97-1.94 and HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.93-1.52) compared with the reference group with TSH of 1.5-2.4?mU/l. Supplementary analyses showed higher hip fracture risk in women with TSH >4.0?mU/l and negative thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) compared with the reference group (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.24-2.46).
We found no statistically significant relation between baseline TSH and subsequent fracture risk, but the data suggest a weak positive association with hip fracture risk among women with both low and high TSH. The latter association was confined to women with negative TPOAb status.
PubMed ID
24031093 View in PubMed
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Early development of secondary hyperparathyroidism following renal transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119386
Source
Nephron Clin Pract. 2012;121(1-2):c68-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Elin Isaksson
Gunnar Sterner
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. elin.isaksson@skane.se
Source
Nephron Clin Pract. 2012;121(1-2):c68-72
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcium - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood - etiology
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - blood - etiology
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphorus - blood
Postoperative Period
Preoperative Period
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Optimal levels of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) in the post-transplant period are not known due to insufficient data. Therefore, we aimed to describe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in Swedish renal transplant (RT) recipients and also report events of fractures and vascular events potentially related to levels of iPTH.
Medical charts from 132 RT recipients were retrospectively reviewed. Laboratory/clinical data were obtained at regular points up to 12 months post RT. Three groups were created based on pre-RT levels of iPTH based on KDOQI recommended levels of iPTH in CKD 5.
One year post RT 69% had iPTH above levels recommended by KDOQI. A multiple regression analysis showed a strong relation between pre-transplant iPTH levels and iPTH levels at 12 months (? coefficient = 0.323, p
Notes
Erratum In: Nephron Clin Pract. 2012;121(3-4):c111
PubMed ID
23107897 View in PubMed
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Evidence for an association of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism C677T and an increased risk of fractures: results from a population-based Danish twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52050
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2004 Aug;15(8):659-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Lise Bathum
Jacob von Bornemann Hjelmborg
Lene Christiansen
Jonna Skov Madsen
Axel Skytthe
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Odense University Hospital, 5000, Denmark. L.Bathum@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2004 Aug;15(8):659-64
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Genotype
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Population Surveillance - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Twins - genetics
Abstract
Osteoporotic fractures are some of the major causes of morbidity and health care expenditure among the elderly. Identifying subjects at risk could be of major importance since several preventive treatments are now available. A large genetic component in the development of osteoporosis has been established. Previous studies concerning association of the common point mutation C677T in methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and osteoporosis have revealed contradictory results. The aim of this study was to test the association between the MTHFR polymorphism, homocysteine, and fractures in a population-based sample of Danish twins aged 73+. In total, 689 subjects, with a mean age of 78 years, participated. Genotype and data of fractures are available from 687 subjects--144 with a previously diagnosed fracture. The genotype distribution is as follows: CC, CT, and TT genotypes, 317 (46.1%), 298 (43.3%), and 73 (10.6%), respectively. Using the proportional odds-ratio model adjusted for age, gender, and body mass Index, the odds-ratio of fracture was 1.5 per number of T alleles--meaning that fracture risk is 1.5 times higher in the CT group compared with the CC group and again 1.5 times higher in the TT group compared with the CT group. Homocysteine, smoking, and self-reported hormone use provided no significant contribution to fracture risk. Using biometrical modelling, the heritability of the liability to fractures was found to be approximately 0.10, when the effect of the MTHFR locus was included, and 0.07 when it was omitted. But both confidence intervals include zero and the estimates are therefore not significant. In conclusion, we here provide evidence for a significant impact of the MTHFR genotype on the occurrence of fractures in an elderly Danish population.
PubMed ID
14727014 View in PubMed
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Fractures in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism: nationwide follow-up study of 1201 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52171
Source
World J Surg. 2003 Mar;27(3):343-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Peter Vestergaard
Leif Mosekilde
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Tage Hansens Gade 2, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. p-vest@post4.tele.dk
Source
World J Surg. 2003 Mar;27(3):343-9
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bone Density
Calcium - blood
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - blood - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism - blood - complications - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Abstract
Parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases bone turnover and may thus increase fracture risk. As PTH secretion is increased in primary hyperparathyroidism, surgical cure may prevent fractures. We studied fracture risk before and after diagnosis in patients treated surgically and conservatively for primary hyperparathyroidism. All 1201 patients with newly diagnosed primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) between 1982 and 1996 in Denmark were identified through the Danish Hospital Discharge Register. Each patient was compared with three age- and gender-matched controls randomly drawn from the background population. Those who were treated surgically ( n = 841; mean age 58.6 +/- 14.6 years) were significantly younger than those who were not ( n = 360; 65.5 +/- 16.8 years; 2 p
PubMed ID
12607064 View in PubMed
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Haplotypes in the CYP2R1 gene are associated with levels of 25(OH)D and bone mineral density, but not with other markers of bone metabolism (MrOS Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300308
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209268
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Anne Björk
Dan Mellström
Claes Ohlsson
Magnus Karlsson
Hans Mallmin
Gunnar Johansson
Östen Ljunggren
Andreas Kindmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209268
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Bone Density - genetics
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase - genetics
Cohort Studies
Cytochrome P450 Family 2 - genetics
Fibroblast Growth Factors - blood
Fractures, Bone - blood - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphates - blood
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Polymorphisms in the CYP2R1 gene encoding Vitamin D 25-hydroxylase have been reported to correlate with circulating levels of 25-OH vitamin D3 (25(OH)D). It is unknown whether these variations also affect overall bone metabolism. In order to elucidate the overall associations of polymorphisms in the CYP2R1, we studied haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene and serum levels of 25(OH)D, calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), as well as bone mineral density (BMD).
Baseline data on serum parameters and BMD from MrOS Sweden, a prospective population-based cohort study of elderly men (mean age 75 years, range 69-81), were analyzed. Genotyping was performed for eight SNPs covering the CYP2R1 gene in 2868 men with available samples of DNA. Subjects were followed up concerning incidence of fracture during five years.
There was a significant genetic association with circulating levels of 25(OH)D (4.6-18.5% difference in mean values between SNP alleles), but there were no correlations with levels of calcium, phosphate, PTH or FGF23 for any genetic variant. No differences were found in fracture incidence between the variants. There was an inverse relationship between lower BMD and concomitant higher 25(OH)D for three of the haplotypes (p
PubMed ID
30576350 View in PubMed
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Intake and serum concentrations of a-tocopherol in relation to fractures in elderly women and men: 2 cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106180
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Karl Michaëlsson
Alicja Wolk
Liisa Byberg
Johan Ärnlöv
Håkan Melhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopedics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (KM and LB); the Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden (AW); the School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden (JÄ); the Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (JÄ); and the Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (HM).
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):107-14
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone and Bones - chemistry - drug effects
Diet Surveys
Dietary Supplements
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - blood - complications
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry - drug effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Vitamin E Deficiency - blood - complications
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
A reduction in the formation of free radicals and oxidative stress might reduce the rate of bone loss and muscle wasting.
The objective was to determine whether a-tocopherol intake or serum concentrations are associated with fracture risk in older women and men.
Two cohort studies, the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC; n = 61,433 women) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n = 1138 men), were used.
During 19 y of follow-up, 14,738 women in the SMC experienced a first fracture at any site (3871 hip fractures). A higher hip fracture rate was observed with lower intakes of a-tocopherol. Compared with the highest quintile of intake, the lowest quintile had a multivariable-adjusted HR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.67, 2.06). The HR of any fracture was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.28). a-Tocopherol-containing supplement use was associated with a reduced rate of hip fracture (HR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.93) and any fracture (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.94). Compared with the highest quintile of a-tocopherol intake in ULSAM (follow-up: 12 y), lower intakes (quintiles 1-4) were associated with a higher rate of hip fracture (HR: 3.33; 95% CI: 1.43, 7.76) and any fracture (HR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.18, 2.88). The HR for hip fracture in men for each 1-SD decrease in serum a-tocopherol was 1.58 (95% CI: 1.13, 2.22) and for any fracture was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.48).
Low intakes and low serum concentrations of a-tocopherol are associated with an increased rate of fracture in elderly women and men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24225359 View in PubMed
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Low Serum DHEAS Predicts Increased Fracture Risk in Older Men: The MrOS Sweden Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291492
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Aug; 32(8):1607-1614
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Claes Ohlsson
Maria Nethander
Andreas Kindmark
Östen Ljunggren
Mattias Lorentzon
Björn E Rosengren
Magnus K Karlsson
Dan Mellström
Liesbeth Vandenput
Author Affiliation
Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Aug; 32(8):1607-1614
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - blood
Dehydroepiandrosterone - blood
Fractures, Bone - blood - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Osteoporosis - blood - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The adrenal-derived hormones dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are the most abundant circulating hormones and their levels decline substantially with age. DHEAS is considered an inactive precursor, which is converted into androgens and estrogens via local metabolism in peripheral target tissues. The predictive value of serum DHEAS for fracture risk is unknown. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the associations between baseline DHEAS levels and incident fractures in a large cohort of older men. Serum DHEAS levels were analyzed with mass spectrometry in the population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study in Sweden (n?=?2568, aged 69 to 81 years). Incident X-ray validated fractures (all, n?=?594; non-vertebral major osteoporotic, n?=?255; hip, n?=?175; clinical vertebral, n?=?206) were ascertained during a median follow-up of 10.6 years. DHEAS levels were inversely associated with the risk of any fracture (hazard ratio [HR] per SD decrease?=?1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.24), non-vertebral major osteoporotic fractures (HR?=?1.31, 95% CI 1.16-1.48), and hip fractures (HR?=?1.18, 95% CI 1.02-1.37) but not clinical vertebral fractures (HR?=?1.09, 95% CI 0.95-1.26) in Cox regression models adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI) and prevalent fractures. Further adjustment for traditional risk factors for fracture, bone mineral density (BMD), and/or physical performance variables as well as serum sex steroid levels only slightly attenuated the associations between serum DHEAS and fracture risk. Similarly, the point estimates were only marginally reduced after adjustment for FRAX estimates with BMD. The inverse association between serum DHEAS and all fractures or major osteoporotic fractures was nonlinear, with a substantial increase in fracture risk (all fractures 22%, major osteoporotic fractures 33%) for those participants with serum DHEAS levels below the median (0.60?µg/mL). In conclusion, low serum DHEAS levels are a risk marker of mainly non-vertebral fractures in older men, of whom those with DHEAS levels below 0.60?µg/mL are at highest risk. © The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.
PubMed ID
28276592 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.