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[Aftercare of malleolar fractures in Denmark. A questionnaire study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198465
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 May 8;162(19):2747-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-2000
Author
K. Hviid
K. Harager
K. Schantz
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 May 8;162(19):2747-50
Date
May-8-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare - methods
Ankle Injuries - rehabilitation - surgery - therapy
Bandages
Denmark
Fracture Fixation - methods
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Abstract
A questionnaire was sent out to 59 orthopaedic departments. Seventy-eight percent returned the questionnaire. Four thousand two hundred ankle fractures are treated annually. Fifty percent are operated on (range 12.5-83%). Large departments are on average more surgically active than smaller ones. The noticeable difference, however, in surgical frequency is not connected to size, function or location of orthopaedic department. All fractures are usually immobilized with a circular plaster bandage. Thirty percent use dynamic bandages for some stable ankle fractures. Eighty-five percent bandage for six weeks, 15% for up to eight weeks. Very few allow early mobilization of surgically treated fractures (6%). The rest do not allow mobilization until at least three weeks after surgery. Stable fractures are more frequently permitted immediate mobilization. Several randomized studies recommend that all ankle fractures should be mobilized immediately, surgically treated in a circular plaster bandage, stable fractures in dynamic bandages.
PubMed ID
10827543 View in PubMed
Less detail

C2 Fracture Subtypes, Incidence, and Treatment Allocation Change with Age: A Retrospective Cohort Study of 233 Consecutive Cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280143
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2017;2017:8321680
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anna-Lena Robinson
Anders Möller
Yohan Robinson
Claes Olerud
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2017;2017:8321680
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cervical Vertebrae - physiopathology - surgery
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Spinal Fractures - classification - physiopathology - surgery
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The currently available data on the distribution of C2 fracture subtypes is sparse. This study was designed to identify the proportions of the second cervical vertebra (C2) fracture subtypes and to present age and gender specific incidences of subgroups. A dataset of all patients treated between 2002 and 2014 for C2 fractures was extracted from the regional hospital information system. C2 fractures were classified into odontoid fractures types 1, 2, and 3, Hangman's fractures types 1, 2, and 3, and atypical C2 fractures. 233 patients (female 51%, age 72 ± 19 years) were treated for a C2 fracture. Odontoid fractures were found in 183 patients, of which 2 were type 1, 127 type 2, and 54 type 3, while 26 of C2 fractures were Hangman's fractures and 24 were atypical C2 fractures. In the geriatric subgroup 89% of all C2 fractures were odontoid, of which 71% were type 2 and 29% type 3. There was an increasing incidence of odontoid fractures types 2 and 3 from 2002 to 2014. 40% of C2 fractures were treated surgically. This study presents reliable subset proportions of C2 fractures in a prospectively collected regional cohort. Knowledge of these proportions facilitates future epidemiological studies of C2 fractures.
PubMed ID
28182084 View in PubMed
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Changes in implant choice and surgical technique for hemiarthroplasty. 21,346 procedures from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register 2005-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129410
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Feb;83(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Olof Leonardsson
Göran Garellick
Johan Kärrholm
Kristina Akesson
Cecilia Rogmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Ortopaedics, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. olof.leonardsson@skane.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Feb;83(1):7-13
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - methods
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - pathology - surgery
Femur Head - injuries - pathology - surgery
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Humans
Male
Registries
Sweden
Treatment Failure
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in Sweden has shifted towards more arthroplasties, especially hemiarthroplasties. We describe the hemiarthroplasty population in Sweden 2005 through 2009.
Since 2005, the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register has registered hemiarthroplasties on a national basis. We assessed hemiarthroplasty procedures in the Register 2005-2009 regarding patient details, implants, and surgical techniques. Completeness of recordings was calculated compared to the Swedish National Patient Register.
Completeness increased from 89% to 96% during the study period. 21,346 hemiarthroplasty procedures were assessed. The relative number of patients with femoral neck fracture as diagnosis increased from 91% to 94%; the proportion of men increased from 27% to 30%. The median age increased from 83 to 84 years in men and from 84 to 85 years in women. Patients classified as having evident cognitive impairment increased from 19% to 22%. More men than women were ASA 4. The proportion of monoblock-type implants (Austin-Moore and Thompson) decreased from 18% to 0.9%. Modular implants increased generally, but in 2009 bipolar implants decreased in favor of unipolar implants. Lubinus and Exeter stems, and Mega Caput and Vario Cup implant heads were most common. The use of uncemented implants decreased from 10% to 3%. Use of the anterolateral approach increased from 47% to 56%.
Important changes in surgical technique and implant choice occurred during the observation period. We interpret these changes as being reflections of the continuing effort by Swedish orthopedic surgeons to improve the quality of treatment, because the changes are consistent with recent findings in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register and in other scientific studies.
Notes
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Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2005 Apr;87(4):523-915795204
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Cites: Acta Orthop. 2009 Oct;80(5):520-419916682
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Oct;81(5):588-9220860442
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1975 Oct;23(10):433-411159263
PubMed ID
22112151 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing methods of hip fracture osteosynthesis in Sweden. An epidemiological enquiry covering 46,900 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221316
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1993 Apr;64(2):173-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
I. Sernbo
H. Fredin
Author Affiliation
Lund University, Department of Orthopedics, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1993 Apr;64(2):173-4
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Nails
Bone Screws
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods - trends
Hip Fractures - surgery
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
An enquiry covering all hospitals in Sweden operating on hip fractures was conducted in 1990. The results were compared with enquiries from 1982 and 1985. In cervical hip fractures the use of single nail has almost disappeared in favor of 2 LIH hook pins and, lately, the Uppsala subchondral screws. Primary hip prosthesis is the ultimate method of choice in Sweden. Among trochanteric hip fracture the Ender nail has almost totally been replaced by a sliding screw and plate device.
PubMed ID
8498179 View in PubMed
Less detail

Complications and survival after surgical treatment of 214 metastatic lesions of the humerus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130645
Source
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2012 Aug;21(8):1049-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Rikard Wedin
Bjarne H Hansen
Minna Laitinen
Clement Trovik
Olga Zaikova
Peter Bergh
Anders Kalén
Gunnar Schwarz-Lausten
Fredrik Vult von Steyern
Anders Walloe
Johnny Keller
Rüdiger J Weiss
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. rikard.wedin@karolinska.se
Source
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2012 Aug;21(8):1049-55
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Bone Nails
Bone Neoplasms - mortality - secondary - surgery
Bone Plates
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods - mortality
Fractures, Spontaneous - mortality - radiography - surgery
Humans
Humeral Fractures - mortality - radiography - surgery
Humerus - pathology - surgery
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Invasiveness - pathology
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - mortality - pathology - surgery
Neoplasm Staging
Postoperative Complications - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostheses and Implants
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The humerus is the second most common long-bone site of metastatic bone disease. We report complications, risk factors for failure, and survival of a large series of patients operated on for skeletal metastases of the humerus.
This study was based on 208 patients treated surgically for 214 metastatic lesions of the humerus. Reconstructions were achieved by intramedullary nails in 148, endoprostheses in 35, plate fixation in 21, and by other methods in 10.
The median age at surgery was 67 years (range, 29-87 years). Breast cancer was the primary tumor in 31%. The overall failure rate of the surgical reconstructions was 9%. The reoperation rate was 7% in the proximal humerus, 8% in the diaphysis, and 33% in the distal part of the bone. Among 36 operations involving an endoprosthesis, 2 were failures (6%) compared with 18 of 178 osteosynthetic devices (10%). In the osteosynthesis group, intramedullary nails failed in 7% and plate fixation failed in 22%. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that prostate cancer was associated with an increased risk of failure after surgery (hazard ratio, 7; P
PubMed ID
21982491 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contemporary demographics and complications of patients treated for open ankle fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275088
Source
Injury. 2015 Aug;46(8):1650-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Mikko T Ovaska
Rami Madanat
Maija Honkamaa
Tatu J Mäkinen
Source
Injury. 2015 Aug;46(8):1650-5
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ankle Fractures - complications - epidemiology - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Debridement
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Fractures, Open - complications - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Flaps
Surgical Wound Infection
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Wound Healing
Abstract
Open ankle fractures are rare injuries with a high likelihood of wound complications and subsequent infections. There is limited information about the complications and outcomes of these injuries in different age groups. The aim of this study was to assess the contemporary demographics and complications related to this injury. We performed a chart review of all the 3030 patients treated for ankle fractures at a Level 1 trauma centre from 2006 to 2011. 137 (4.5%) patients had an open ankle fracture. The demographic data, injury mechanism, comorbidities, and fracture type were collected. Treatment, complications, length of stay and number of outpatient visits were also recorded. The mean age of the patients was 60 years and 56% were women. Most fractures were Weber type B with a medial sided wound (93%). Only 20% of the fractures were the result of high-energy trauma, and 31% were Gustilo grade III injuries. Immediate internal fixation was performed in 82% of patients, and the wound was primarily closed in most cases (80%). The incidence of postoperative wound necrosis and deep infection was 18% and 17%, respectively. There were more deep infections if pulsatile lavage was used during the wound debridement (p=0.029). About 14 (10%) patients required a flap reconstruction to cover the soft-tissue defect. Every other patient (54%) had a complication, and 21 patients (15%) suffered a long-term disability related to the injury. The number complications did not differ for nighttime and daytime operations (p=0.083). High-energy injuries were more common in younger patients (p
PubMed ID
25935358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost of miniplate fixation of facial fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226894
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1991 Feb;87(2):382-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
L C Argenta
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1991 Feb;87(2):382-3
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Plates - economics
Bone Screws - economics
Canada
Cost Control
Facial Bones - injuries - surgery
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Humans
Skull Fractures - surgery
Notes
Comment On: Plast Reconstr Surg. 1990 Jun;85(6):878-902349294
PubMed ID
2018584 View in PubMed
Less detail

Current management of tibial shaft fractures: a survey of 450 Canadian orthopedic trauma surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154854
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Oct;79(5):689-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Jason W Busse
Emily Morton
Christina Lacchetti
Gordon H Guyatt
Mohit Bhandari
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. j.busse@utoronto.ca
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Oct;79(5):689-94
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electric Stimulation Therapy
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary - methods
Fracture Healing - drug effects - physiology
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Tibial Fractures - surgery
Ultrasonic Therapy
Abstract
Strategies to manage tibial fractures include nonoperative and operative approaches. Strategies to enhance healing include a variety of bone stimulators. It is not known what forms of management for tibial fractures predominate among Canadian orthopedic surgeons. We therefore asked a representative sample of orthopedic trauma surgeons about their management of tibial fracture patients.
This was a cross-sectional survey of 450 Canadian orthopedic trauma surgeons. We inquired about demographic variables and current tibial shaft fracture management strategies.
268 surgeons completed the survey, a response rate of 60%. Most respondents (80%) managed closed tibial shaft fracture operatively; 47% preferred reamed intramedullary nailing and 40% preferred unreamed. For open tibial shaft fractures, 59% of surgeons preferred reamed intramedullary nailing. Some surgeons (16%) reported use of bone stimulators for management of uncomplicated open and closed tibial shaft fractures, and almost half (45%) made use of this adjunctive modality for complicated tibial shaft fractures. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and electrical stimulation proved equally popular (21% each) and 80% of respondents felt that a reduction in healing time of 6 weeks or more, attributed to a bone stimulator, would be clinically important.
Current practice regarding orthopedic management of tibial shaft fractures in Canada strongly favors operative treatment with intramedullary nailing, although respondents were divided in their preference for reamed and unreamed nailing. Use of bone stimulators is common as an adjunctive modality in this injury population. Large randomized trials are needed to provide better evidence to guide clinical decision making regarding the choice of reamed or unreamed nailing for tibial shaft fractures, and to inform surgeons about the actual effect of bone stimulators.
PubMed ID
18839377 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Deficient follow-up of surgically treated fractures of the foot joint. Tendency towards fewer check-ups because of cost savings].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210541
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Nov 27;93(48):4420-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1996

48 records – page 1 of 5.