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21 records – page 1 of 3.

Building individual histories with registries. A case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241538
Source
Med Care. 1983 Oct;21(10):955-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1983
Author
L L Roos
J P Nicol
Source
Med Care. 1983 Oct;21(10):955-69
Date
Oct-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Death Certificates
Forms and Records Control - methods
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting
Manitoba
Medical Record Linkage
Quality Control
Registries
Vital statistics
Abstract
This study concentrates on utilizing registries and assessing their quality for population-based research. A method of successive comparisons is used to develop and update a summary record of coverage (length of time on the registry) and mortality for each individual in the Manitoba Health Services Commission data base. Various ways to ascertain the accuracy of the summary records are discussed. These techniques are validated by efforts to follow over an 8-year period 4,794 individuals interviewed in 1971 as part of ongoing research on the Manitoba elderly. Ninety-seven percent of the total elderly sample (and 99% of those successfully matched with interviewees) were traced over 8 years. Deaths recorded on hospital claims but not on the master registry and possible unrecorded out-of-hospital deaths are outstanding problems with the Manitoba data base. Further checks against 1970-1977 vital statistics information in the Canadian Mortality Data Base will be made.
PubMed ID
6656326 View in PubMed
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Capturing cases in workers' compensation databases: the example of neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169295
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2006 Jul;49(7):557-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Dwayne Van Eerd
Pierre Côté
Dorcas Beaton
Sheilah Hogg-Johnson
Marjan Vidmar
Vicki Kristman
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. dvaneerd@iwh.on.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2006 Jul;49(7):557-68
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Algorithms
Database Management Systems
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Forms and Records Control - methods
Humans
Neck Injuries - epidemiology
Neck Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
There is a need to more accurately enumerate workers with musculoskeletal injuries who make lost-time claims to workers compensation boards. The objective of this study is to develop an approach to more accurately enumerate these workers.
Lost-time claims to the Ontario Workplace Safety & Insurance Board (WSIB) were reviewed. Using neck pain as an example, nature of injury and part of body codes were identified to classify cases. Claims of a random sample of 434 claimants were reviewed. The proportion of claimants classified as having neck pain was computed.
The proportion of claimants classified with soft-tissue injuries to the neck varied from 0.88 for codes including "neck/cervical region," 0.69 for "back region" to 0.05 for those coded as "shoulder/upper arm."
Restricting the enumeration of injuries to specific part of body codes can lead to a gross underestimation of the magnitude of soft-tissue disorders in epidemiological studies using workers' compensation data. The proposed approach leads to more accurate enumeration.
PubMed ID
16691612 View in PubMed
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Coding algorithms for defining comorbidities in ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 administrative data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172421
Source
Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Hude Quan
Vijaya Sundararajan
Patricia Halfon
Andrew Fong
Bernard Burnand
Jean-Christophe Luthi
L Duncan Saunders
Cynthia A Beck
Thomas E Feasby
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. hquan@ucalgary.ca
Source
Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Disease - classification
Female
Forms and Records Control - methods
Hospital Mortality
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Medical Records - classification
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Risk Adjustment
Abstract
Implementation of the International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10) coding system presents challenges for using administrative data. Recognizing this, we conducted a multistep process to develop ICD-10 coding algorithms to define Charlson and Elixhauser comorbidities in administrative data and assess the performance of the resulting algorithms.
ICD-10 coding algorithms were developed by "translation" of the ICD-9-CM codes constituting Deyo's (for Charlson comorbidities) and Elixhauser's coding algorithms and by physicians' assessment of the face-validity of selected ICD-10 codes. The process of carefully developing ICD-10 algorithms also produced modified and enhanced ICD-9-CM coding algorithms for the Charlson and Elixhauser comorbidities. We then used data on in-patients aged 18 years and older in ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 administrative hospital discharge data from a Canadian health region to assess the comorbidity frequencies and mortality prediction achieved by the original ICD-9-CM algorithms, the enhanced ICD-9-CM algorithms, and the new ICD-10 coding algorithms.
Among 56,585 patients in the ICD-9-CM data and 58,805 patients in the ICD-10 data, frequencies of the 17 Charlson comorbidities and the 30 Elixhauser comorbidities remained generally similar across algorithms. The new ICD-10 and enhanced ICD-9-CM coding algorithms either matched or outperformed the original Deyo and Elixhauser ICD-9-CM coding algorithms in predicting in-hospital mortality. The C-statistic was 0.842 for Deyo's ICD-9-CM coding algorithm, 0.860 for the ICD-10 coding algorithm, and 0.859 for the enhanced ICD-9-CM coding algorithm, 0.868 for the original Elixhauser ICD-9-CM coding algorithm, 0.870 for the ICD-10 coding algorithm and 0.878 for the enhanced ICD-9-CM coding algorithm.
These newly developed ICD-10 and ICD-9-CM comorbidity coding algorithms produce similar estimates of comorbidity prevalence in administrative data, and may outperform existing ICD-9-CM coding algorithms.
PubMed ID
16224307 View in PubMed
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Coding response to a case-mix measurement system based on multiple diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179367
Source
Health Serv Res. 2004 Aug;39(4 Pt 1):1027-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Colin Preyra
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Canada. Colin@preyra.com
Source
Health Serv Res. 2004 Aug;39(4 Pt 1):1027-45
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Cost Allocation
Diagnosis-Related Groups - classification - economics
Efficiency, Organizational
Forms and Records Control - methods
Health Services Research
Hospital Costs
Hospital Information Systems - organization & administration
Humans
Inpatients - classification
Medical Records - classification
Models, Econometric
Ontario
Regression Analysis
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Abstract
To examine the hospital coding response to a payment model using a case-mix measurement system based on multiple diagnoses and the resulting impact on a hospital cost model.
Financial, clinical, and supplementary data for all Ontario short stay hospitals from years 1997 to 2002.
Disaggregated trends in hospital case-mix growth are examined for five years following the adoption of an inpatient classification system making extensive use of combinations of secondary diagnoses. Hospital case mix is decomposed into base and complexity components. The longitudinal effects of coding variation on a standard hospital payment model are examined in terms of payment accuracy and impact on adjustment factors.
Introduction of the refined case-mix system provided incentives for hospitals to increase reporting of secondary diagnoses and resulted in growth in highest complexity cases that were not matched by increased resource use over time. Despite a pronounced coding response on the part of hospitals, the increase in measured complexity and case mix did not reduce the unexplained variation in hospital unit cost nor did it reduce the reliance on the teaching adjustment factor, a potential proxy for case mix. The main implication was changes in the size and distribution of predicted hospital operating costs.
Jurisdictions introducing extensive refinements to standard diagnostic related group (DRG)-type payment systems should consider the effects of induced changes to hospital coding practices. Assessing model performance should include analysis of the robustness of classification systems to hospital-level variation in coding practices. Unanticipated coding effects imply that case-mix models hypothesized to perform well ex ante may not meet expectations ex post.
Notes
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2001 Feb;35(6):1267-9111221819
Cites: J Health Care Finance. 2002 Spring;28(3):1-1312079147
Cites: Med Care. 2002 Oct;40(10):847-5012395017
Cites: Med Care. 2002 Oct;40(10):856-6712395020
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Jul 4;313(1):20-43923354
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1997 Oct 15;127(8 Pt 2):666-749382378
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Feb 11;318(6):352-53123929
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1989 Summer;8(2):35-472501203
Cites: JAMA. 1992 Aug 19;268(7):896-91640619
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1992 Dec;27(5):587-606; discussion 607-121464535
Cites: Med Care. 1996 Aug;34(8):767-828709659
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1986 Summer;7(4):51-6510311672
PubMed ID
15230940 View in PubMed
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Creative solutions through utilization management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221679
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Brown
R J Smith
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):25-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
British Columbia
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - utilization
Efficiency
Forms and Records Control - methods
Home Care Services - utilization
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous - methods
Operating Rooms - utilization
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Program Development - methods
Utilization Review - organization & administration
Abstract
In this second and concluding report on utilization management practices at Lions Gate Hospital in British Columbia, the authors outline various initiatives that improve efficiency and increase quality of care. Topics explored are laparoscopic cholecystectomy as an example of new technology that can save time and resources, a home IV therapy program, co-ordinating care by means of coordinated care mapping, and improving operating room efficiency through rigorous scheduling.
PubMed ID
10125209 View in PubMed
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The development of a medication reminder card for elderly persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226535
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1991 Apr;44(2):55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
R. Grymonpre
C. Sabiston
B. Johns
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1991 Apr;44(2):55-62
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Community Pharmacy Services
Data Collection
Forms and Records Control - methods
Humans
Manitoba
Medication Systems - organization & administration
Patient compliance
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This paper describes the development and testing of a medication reminder card specifically designed for elderly persons on complex drug regimens. The need for such a system was confirmed by a survey of approximately 100 Canadian hospital pharmacy departments where no system provided at discharge by respondents met with our criteria for the "ideal" card. The new medication reminder card was tested in 29 ambulatory and 16 institutionalized elderly persons. Over 75 percent of patients continued to use the card two weeks post enrollment and a majority of ambulatory elderly were still using the card at six weeks. In addition to organizing medications and providing a reminder for patients to take drugs, the card facilitated communication with the pharmacist (a mean of 20 minutes) and with other health care professionals. Patients found the card easy to read and the system easy to understand. Despite time constraints, eight of nine participating community pharmacists indicated they would continue to use the system for select patients. A major obstacle to the use of the card was patient reluctance, for a variety of reasons. Although the card will require further modification in design, it provides a useful alternative as a compliance aid for ambulatory and hospitalized patients on chronic, complex drug regimens.
PubMed ID
10111725 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic coding accuracy for traumatic spinal cord injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154858
Source
Spinal Cord. 2009 May;47(5):367-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
E M Hagen
T. Rekand
N E Gilhus
M. Gronning
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ellen.merete.hagen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Spinal Cord. 2009 May;47(5):367-71
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Forms and Records Control - methods
Hospitals, University
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - utilization
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Spinal Cord Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Retrospective register study enhanced and verified by medical records.
To study whether electronic searches of discharge diagnosis are valid for epidemiological research of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD).
Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
We identified all hospital admissions with discharge codes suggesting a traumatic SCI from ICD-8 to ICD-10 in the electronic database at Haukeland University Hospital, and ascertained the cases by reviewing all hospital records.
1080 patients had an ICD diagnostic code suggesting a traumatic SCI. Only 260 were verified when reviewing the hospital records. The ICD-10 codes had superior positive predictive values (PPV) and likelihood ratios (LR+) compared with the codes from ICD-8 and ICD-9. Combining seven codes from ICD-10 (S14.0, S14.1, S24.0, S24.1, S34.1, S34.3, T91.3) gave the highest sensitivity (0.83), specificity (0.97), PPV (0.88) and LR+ (30.23).
Obtaining hospital discharge diagnoses solely from electronic databases overestimates the incidence of traumatic SCI. Identification of patients using ICD-10 codes is more complicated because acute traumatic SCI and traumatic SCI sequelae are listed with several codes. The latest ICD version proved to be most reliable when identifying patients with traumatic SCI. However, ICD data cannot be trusted without extensive validity checks for either research or for health planning and administration.
PubMed ID
18839007 View in PubMed
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Documenting natural recovery in American-Indian drinking behavior: a coding scheme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5529
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jul;65(4):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Marjorie Bezdek
Calvin Croy
Paul Spicer
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Mail Stop F800, P.O. Box 6508, Aurora, Colorado 80045-0508, USA. Marjorie.Bezdek@uchsc.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jul;65(4):428-33
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Documentation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forms and Records Control - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This report describes a coding scheme developed to analyze how some American Indians changed their drinking behavior and explores the contributions of this approach to our understanding of natural recovery in American-Indian communities. METHOD: We analyzed the responses to two open-ended questions about drinking in an epidemiological survey. The first question asked what helped respondents to quit or cut down on their drinking; the second asked respondents what they did instead of drinking when they wanted to drink. Codes were developed using anthropological analyses of content and then refined through analyses of frequencies and attempts to establish reliability. The frequencies of these codes were then examined by gender, age and current drinking status. RESULTS: Reliability was attained for the coding of responses to both questions. Their content reflects salient themes in the literature on natural recovery. The distribution of these codes across gender, age and current drinking status reveals interesting insights into what prompts and supports quitting and change for different members of these American-Indian communities, especially for women, older respondents and those who abstain from alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: This approach points the way to a consideration of a broad set of factors related to changes in drinking behavior in American-Indian populations that can be applied in future studies, both in American-Indian communities and, potentially, in other populations as well.
PubMed ID
15376816 View in PubMed
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Electronic case-report forms of symptoms and impairments of peripheral neuropathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188839
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2002 Aug;29(3):258-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Peter J Dyck
David W Turner
Jenny L Davies
Peter C O'Brien
P James B Dyck
Cynthia A Rask
Author Affiliation
Peripheral Neuropathy Research Center, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN, USA.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2002 Aug;29(3):258-66
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Canada
Data Collection
Database Management Systems
Forms and Records Control - methods
Humans
Medical Informatics Applications
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - physiopathology
Software
Work Simplification
Abstract
For the conduct of controlled clinical trials, epidemiologic surveys or even of medical practice of varieties of peripheral neuropathy, the usefulness, error rate and cost-effectiveness of scannable case-report forms has not been studied.
The overall performance, the frequency of the problems identified and corrected, and the time saved from use of a standard paper case report form was evaluated in multicenter treatment trials, single center epidemiologic surveys and in our neurologic practice. The paper case report form (Clinical Neuropathy Assessment [CNA]) for pen entry at study medical centers for patient, disease and demographic information (Lower Limb Function [LLF] and Neuropathy Impairment Score [NIS]) can be faxed to a core Reading and Quality Assurance Center where the form and data is electronically and interactively evaluated and corrected, if needed, by participating medical centers before electronic entry into database.
1) The approach provides a standard, scannable paper case report form for pen entry of neuropathy symptoms, impairments and disability at the bedside or in the office which is retained as a source document at the participating medical center but a facsimile can be transferred instantaneously, its data can be programmed, interactively evaluated, modified and stored while maintaining an audit trail; 2) it allowed efficient and accurate reading, transfer, analysis, and storage of data of more than 15,000 forms used in multicenter trials; 3) in 500 consecutive CNA evaluations, software programs identified and facilitated interactive corrections of omissions, discrepancies, and disease and study inconsistencies, introducing only a few readily identified and corrected entry errors; and 4) use of programmed, as compared to non-programmed assessment, was more accurate than double keyboard entry of data and was approximately five times faster.
PubMed ID
12195616 View in PubMed
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ICD-10-CA/CCI coding algorithms for defining clinical variables to assess outcome after aortic and mitral valve replacement surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170647
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Feb;22(2):153-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
H. Quan
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. hquan@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Feb;22(2):153-4
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Aortic Valve - surgery
Canada
Current Procedural Terminology
Forms and Records Control - methods
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - classification
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Mitral Valve - surgery
Models, Statistical
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Risk Adjustment
Abstract
Implementation of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision, Canada (ICD-10-CA) and the Canadian Classification of Interventions (CCI) coding system presents challenges for using Canadian administrative data. Thus, a multi-step process was conducted to develop ICD-10-CA/CCI coding algorithms to define nine comorbidities and three procedures. These clinical variables have been used in ICD-9-CM data for risk adjustment in assessment of outcomes after aortic and mitral valve replacement surgery. Among patients included in the ICD-9-CM data during 1999 and 2001 and in the ICD-10-CA/CCI data during 2002 and 2003 in a Canadian Health Region, frequencies of the nine comorbidities and the three procedures remained generally similar across databases. The newly developed ICD-10-CA/CCI and previous ICD-9-CM coding algorithms are comparable in detecting these clinical variables. However, performance of ICD-10-CA/CCI coding algorithms in risk adjustment should be evaluated in a larger database.
Notes
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-916224307
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;20(2):155-6315010737
PubMed ID
16485052 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.