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45 records – page 1 of 5.

Active sensitization and occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by para-tertiary-butylcatechol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206305
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
T. Estlander
M. Kostiainen
R. Jolanki
L. Kanerva
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, (FIOH), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):96-100
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesives - adverse effects
Adult
Antioxidants - adverse effects
Catechols - administration & dosage - adverse effects - chemistry
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethylenediamines - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Humans
Immunization
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Patch Tests
Phenols - adverse effects - chemistry
Phenylenediamines - adverse effects
Plastics - adverse effects
Resins, Plant - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
Para-tertiary-butylcatechol (PTBC) is a rare allergen which is used in the rubber, paint and petroleum industries. We present 9 patients who were sensitized to PTBC and examined at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) between 1974 and 1995. 3 of the patients had been exposed to PTBC in their work. 2 of them also had allergic reactions to para-tertiary-butylphenol (PTBP)-formaldehyde resin and to PTBP. 5 of the patients became sensitized to PTBC from patch testing. PTBC was found to be one of the most common causes of active sensitization in our clinic. Accordingly, at the FIOH, the patch test concentration of PTBC was lowered to 0.25% and this lower concentration is recommended for general use.
PubMed ID
9506222 View in PubMed
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[Adverse effects of formalin, compensation matters and the NSF (Norwegian Nurses' Association)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206949
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Nov 11;85(19):50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-11-1997
Author
L. Larsen
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Nov 11;85(19):50
Date
Nov-11-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Formaldehyde - adverse effects - economics
Humans
Norway
Occupational Exposure
Societies, Nursing
Workers' Compensation
PubMed ID
9418574 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of patients with allergic patch test reactions to a plastics and glues series.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215080
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1995 Jun;32(6):346-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
K. Tarvainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1995 Jun;32(6):346-51
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesives - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Ethylenediamines - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Plastics - adverse effects
Resins, Plant - adverse effects
Resorcinols - adverse effects
Abstract
839 patients were patch tested with a series of 31 plastics and glues allergens at a dermatologic clinic over a period of 7 years. 52 (6%) had a positive patch test reaction to 1 or more such allergens. Clinic charts of 47 patients (out of 52) were available for the study. All but 3 patients had dermatitis on their hands: 17 had only hand dermatitis. 25 (53%) patients' test results were of present or past relevance to their skin diseases. 11 patients (68%) with occupational allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and 14 (45%) with non-occupational dermatitis had relevant reactions. p-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin was the most common allergen (9 cases). 7 patients reacted to diaminodiphenylmethane. 5 patients, who had colophony allergy, reacted to abietic acid and 4 to abitol. There was no reaction to 14 test substances. Special series, such as this plastics and glues series, reveal the cause of ACD less frequently than standard series. However, there is no other way to confirm allergy to these usually industrial allergens, which can also sensitize through non-occupational exposure during hobby working or through unpolymerized monomer left in the finished plastic product.
PubMed ID
7554881 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks due to occupational exposure to formaldehyde: results of a multi-site case-control study in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230466
Source
Int J Cancer. 1989 Jul 15;44(1):53-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1989
Author
M. Gérin
J. Siemiatycki
L. Nadon
R. Dewar
D. Krewski
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine du travail et d'hygiène du milieu, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1989 Jul 15;44(1):53-8
Date
Jul-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Quebec
Risk
Abstract
A case-control study was undertaken in Montreal to investigate the possible associations between occupational exposures and cancers of the following sites: oesophagus, stomach, colo-rectum, liver, pancreas, lung, prostate, bladder, kidney, melanoma and lymphoid tissue. In total, 3,726 cancer patients and 533 population controls were interviewed to obtain detailed lifetime job histories and information on potential confounders. Each job history was translated into a history of occupational exposures. Because of current concerns about formaldehyde carcinogenicity, we carried out a special analysis of the association between exposure to formaldehyde and each type of cancer covered by this study. Separate statistical analyses were carried out for each type of cancer using population controls as well as a control series drawn from among the other cancer sites in the study. Although nearly a quarter of all subjects had undergone occupational exposure to formaldehyde, the levels of exposure were in general quite low. There was no persuasive evidence of an increased risk of any type of cancer among men exposed to these levels of formaldehyde. However, the possibility of a small increase in risk could not be ruled out.
PubMed ID
2744897 View in PubMed
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Concomitant contact allergies to formaldehyde, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone, methylisothiazolinone, and fragrance mixes I and II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281951
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2016 Nov;75(5):285-289
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Ann Pontén
Magnus Bruze
Malin Engfeldt
Inese Hauksson
Marléne Isaksson
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2016 Nov;75(5):285-289
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Female
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Patch Tests
Perfume - adverse effects
Preservatives, Pharmaceutical - adverse effects
Sweden
Thiazoles - adverse effects
Abstract
Contact allergies to the preservatives formaldehyde and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)/methylisothiazolinone (MI) have been reported to appear together at a statistically significant level. Recently, revisions concerning the patch test preparations of MCI/MI, MI and formaldehyde have been recommended for the European baseline series.
To investigate (i) the number of concomitant contact allergies to the preservatives, (ii) the number of concomitant contact allergies to the preservatives and the fragrance mixes (FM I and FM II) and (iii) gender differences.
Patients tested with the Swedish baseline series during the period 2012-2014 at the Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology in Malmö, Sweden were investigated.
2165 patients were patch tested with the baseline series (34% males and 66% females). Contact allergies to formaldehyde and MCI/MI and/or MI were significantly associated (p?
PubMed ID
27145058 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1976 Oct;17:221-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1976
Author
G S Wiberg
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1976 Oct;17:221-5
Date
Oct-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aerosols
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Dermatitis, Contact - etiology
Drug Packaging
Eating
Fires
Food Contamination
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Government
Humans
Injections
Plastics - adverse effects
Vision Disorders - chemically induced
Abstract
The modern consumer is exposed to a wide variety of plastic and rubber products in his day to day life: at home, work, school, shopping, recreation and play, and transport. A large variety of toxic sequellae have resulted from untoward exposures by many different routes: oral, dermal, inhalation, and parenteral. Toxic change may result from the plastic itself, migration of unbound components and additives, chemical decomposition or toxic pyrolysis products. The type of damage may involve acute poisoning, chronic organ damage, reproductive disorders, and carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic episodes. Typical examples for all routes are cited along with the activites of Canadian regulatory agencies to reduce both the incidence and severity of plastic-induced disease.
Notes
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health. 1975 Sep;1(1):153-711102723
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1975 Jun;11:29-331175565
Cites: Br J Dermatol. 1966 Dec;78(12):632-55955587
PubMed ID
1026409 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effects of formaldehyde on the staff of selected day care institutions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74363
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1981 Oct 19;143(43):2841-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1981

[Evaluation of Moscow population exposure to ambient air pollution by carcinogenic substances].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144388
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
S G Fokin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):18-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - chemically induced - epidemiology
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Moscow - epidemiology
Motor Vehicles
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Urban Population
Abstract
The carcinogenic risk to the Moscow population exposed to ambient air pollutants, such as benzene and formaldehyde, discharged by motor transport has been assessed. The ways of lowering the negative impact of motor transport on the urban environment are considered.
PubMed ID
20373707 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to formaldehyde: effects on pulmonary function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51438
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1982 Sep-Oct;37(5):279-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Alexandersson
G. Hedenstierna
B. Kolmodin-Hedman
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1982 Sep-Oct;37(5):279-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Formaldehyde - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Lung - drug effects
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Spirometry
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Forty-seven subjects exposed to formaldehyde (mean air concentration 0.45 mg/m3) and 20 unexposed subjects, all of whom were employed at a carpentry shop, were studied with regard to symptoms and pulmonary function. Symptoms involving eyes and throat as well as chest oppression were significantly more common in the exposed subjects than in the unexposed controls. Spirometry and single breath nitrogen washout were normal Monday morning before exposure to formaldehyde. A reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec by an average of 0.2 L (P = .002), percent forced expiratory volume by 2% (P = .04), maximum midexpiratory flow by 0.3 L/sec (P = .04) and an increase in closing volume in percentage of vital capacity by 3.4% (P - .002) were seen after a day of work and exposure to formaldehyde, suggesting bronchoconstriction. Smokers and nonsmokers displayed similar changes in spirometry and nitrogen washout.
PubMed ID
7138077 View in PubMed
Less detail

45 records – page 1 of 5.