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10 year survey of pretrial examinations in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246688
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
R. Kunjukrishnan
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1979 Nov;24(7):683-9
Date
Nov-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Crime
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
The results of a survey of pretrial examination cases admitted to the provincial psychiatric hospital in Saskatchewan from 1966 to 1975 are reported. The demographic and psychiatric data and data from the psychiatric reports to the Court are analyzed. Some deficiencies noted in the reports to the Court are discussed and some remedial measures are suggested.
PubMed ID
519634 View in PubMed
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[46 forensic psychiatric problems in cases of sexual abuse. Sex crime hysteria or public health problem?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34321
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Mar 26;94(13):1211-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-26-1997
Author
R. Schlaug
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Mar 26;94(13):1211-2
Date
Mar-26-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Sex Offenses
Sweden
PubMed ID
9148064 View in PubMed
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About the concept of the "dangerous individual" in 19th-century legal psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248925
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1978 Feb;1(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1978
Author
M. Foucault
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1978 Feb;1(1):1-18
Date
Feb-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dangerous Behavior
Europe
Forensic Psychiatry - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Terminology as Topic
Violence
PubMed ID
374291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absolute versus relative ascertainment of pedophilia in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147471
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ray Blanchard
Michael E Kuban
Thomas Blak
James M Cantor
Philip E Klassen
Robert Dickey
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Ray_Blanchard@camh.net
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Audiovisual Aids
Child
Choice Behavior
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - methods
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Ontario
Pedophilia - classification - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Penile Erection - physiology - psychology
Plethysmography - methods - standards
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Psychophysiology - methods - standards
Referral and Consultation
Tape Recording
Abstract
There are at least two different criteria for assessing pedophilia in men: absolute ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is intense) and relative ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is greater than their interest in adults). The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition (DSM-III) used relative ascertainment in its diagnostic criteria for pedophilia; this was abandoned and replaced by absolute ascertainment in the DSM-III-R and all subsequent editions. The present study was conducted to demonstrate the continuing need for relative ascertainment, particularly in the laboratory assessment of pedophilia. A total of 402 heterosexual men were selected from a database of patients referred to a specialty clinic. These had undergone phallometric testing, a psychophysiological procedure in which their penile blood volume was monitored while they were presented with a standardized set of laboratory stimuli depicting male and female children, pubescents, and adults.The 130 men selected for the Teleiophilic Profile group responded substantially to prepubescent girls but even more to adult women; the 272 men selected for the Pedophilic Profile group responded weakly to prepubescent girls but even less to adult women. In terms of absolute magnitude, every patient in the Pedophilic Profile group had a lesser penile response to prepubescent girls than every patient in the Teleiophilic Profile group. Nevertheless, the Pedophilic Profile group had a significantly greater number of known sexual offenses against prepubescent girls, indicating that they contained a higher proportion of true pedophiles. These results dramatically demonstrate the utility-or perhaps necessity-of relative ascertainment in the laboratory assessment of erotic age-preference.
PubMed ID
19901237 View in PubMed
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Abuse prevalence and victim gender among adult and adolescent child molesters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186694
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2003 Mar-Apr;26(2):179-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Scott Aylwin
Lea H Studer
John R Reddon
Steven R Clelland
Author Affiliation
Phoenix Program, Forensic Psychiatric Services, Alberta Hospital Edmonton, 17480 Fort Road, Box 307, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5J 2J7. scott.aylwin@amhb.ab.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2003 Mar-Apr;26(2):179-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - classification
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Prisoners - psychology
Residential Treatment
PubMed ID
12581754 View in PubMed
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[Accidents, suicide or cry for help? 173 fatal cases on the railroads during 1990-95]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68450
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Mar 12;94(11):973-4, 979-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-1997

Accountability and psychiatric disorders: how do forensic psychiatric professionals think?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148112
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pontus Höglund
Sten Levander
Henrik Anckarsäter
Susanna Radovic
Author Affiliation
Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Science, Malmo, Lund University, Sweden. pontus.hoglund@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;32(6):355-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Character
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Comorbidity
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology
Educational Status
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Insanity Defense
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Swedish penal law does not exculpate on the grounds of diminished accountability; persons judged to suffer from severe mental disorder are sentenced to forensic psychiatric care instead of prison. Re-introduction of accountability as a condition for legal responsibility has been advocated, not least by forensic psychiatric professionals. To investigate how professionals in forensic psychiatry would assess degree of accountability based on psychiatric diagnoses and case vignettes, 30 psychiatrists, 30 psychologists, 45 nurses, and 45 ward attendants from five forensic psychiatric clinics were interviewed. They were asked (i) to judge to which degree (on a dimensional scale from 1 to 5) each of 12 psychiatric diagnoses might affect accountability, (ii) to assess accountability from five case vignettes, and (iii) to list further factors they regarded as relevant for their assessment of accountability. All informants accepted to provide a dimensional assessment of accountability on this basis and consistently found most types of mental disorders to reduce accountability, especially psychotic disorders and dementia. Other factors thought to be relevant were substance abuse, social network, personality traits, social stress, and level of education.
PubMed ID
19811835 View in PubMed
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Accumulated coercion and short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142568
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Lars Kjellin
Tuula Wallsten
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Psychiatric Research Centre, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lars.kjellin@orebroll.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:53
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - statistics & numerical data
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The knowledge of the impact of coercion on psychiatric treatment outcome is limited. Multiple measures of coercion have been recommended. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of accumulated coercive incidents on short-term outcome of inpatient psychiatric care
233 involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed within five days of admission and at discharge or after maximum three weeks of care. Coercion was measured as number of coercive incidents, i.e. subjectively reported and in the medical files recorded coercive incidents, including legal status and perceived coercion at admission, and recorded and reported coercive measures during treatment. Outcome was measured both as subjective improvement of mental health and as improvement in professionally assessed functioning according to GAF. Logistic regression analyses were performed with patient characteristics and coercive incidents as independent and the two outcome measures as dependent variables
Number of coercive incidents did not predict subjective or assessed improvement. Patients having other diagnoses than psychoses or mood disorders were less likely to be subjectively improved, while a low GAF at admission predicted an improvement in GAF scores
The results indicate that subjectively and professionally assessed mental health short-term outcome of acute psychiatric hospitalisation are not predicted by the amount of subjectively and recorded coercive incidents. Further studies are needed to examine the short- and long-term effects of coercive interventions in psychiatric care.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 1996 Spring;19(2):201-178725657
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 1997 Dec;48(12):1567-709406265
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 1998 Winter;21(1):31-429526713
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 1999 Mar-Apr;22(2):143-5310224553
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 Feb;40(2):160-615685408
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;41(3):241-716424967
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Oct;114(4):232-4116968360
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2006 Dec;41(12):975-8017080321
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;191:373-417978314
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2007 Nov-Dec;30(6):504-1117905434
Cites: Memory. 2008;16(5):548-5518569683
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Jan;194(1):49-5419118325
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2000 May-Aug;23(3-4):293-30710981273
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Jan;103(1):60-511202130
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(1):15-2111869460
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2002 Mar-Apr;25(2):93-10812071105
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2004 Jul;55(7):786-9115232018
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1994 Nov;90(5):379-847872044
Cites: Behav Sci Law. 1993 Summer;11(3):307-2110150233
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1995 Dec;52(12):1034-97492255
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 1997 Summer;20(3):311-229347394
PubMed ID
20584301 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A classification system of anogenital findings. A diagnostic tool in the assessment of sexually abused children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34023
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 10;118(1):67-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1998
Author
A K Myhre
K. Berntzen
E. Selvaag
E K Normann
B. Ruud
G. Borgen
Author Affiliation
Det medisinske fakultet, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 10;118(1):67-70
Date
Jan-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anal Canal - injuries
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - classification - diagnosis
English Abstract
Female
Forensic Medicine - standards
Forensic Psychiatry - standards
Humans
Male
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Urogenital Diseases - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Abstract
The assessment of suspected sexual child abuse demands teamwork where the paediatrician plays a central role. From a juridical point of view, the task of the paediatrician is to evaluate the anatomic, microbiologic and forensic medical findings. In 1995, in order to improve the quality of this work, Norwegian paediatricians established a peer review group which meets on a regular basis. Based on available literature and the experience of the individual members, a classification system for anogenital findings has been developed. The findings are divided into five classes. Class one comprises findings frequently seen in children who have not been abused. Class two comprises findings not considered to be normal, but for which there could be many different causes. Classes three, four and five represent findings which are increasingly predictive with respect to injury penetration or attempted penetration. Since our knowledge of anogenital anatomy in children who have not been abused is limited, our classification system should be updated regularly.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 May 10;118(12):19109638062
PubMed ID
9481915 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A consensus conference in forensic psychiatry is needed to coordinate survey and care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225664
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1991
Author
M. Elton
Author Affiliation
Rättspsykiatriska regionvårdsenheten, Birgittas sjukhus, Vadstena.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Date
Sep-25-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Forensic Psychiatry - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Sweden
Violence
PubMed ID
1921615 View in PubMed
Less detail

527 records – page 1 of 53.