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Characteristics of sex-related homicides in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143245
Source
J Forensic Nurs. 2010;6(2):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Tara Henry
Author Affiliation
Forensic Nurse Services, Anchorage, AK 99516, USA. thenry@alaska.net
Source
J Forensic Nurs. 2010;6(2):57-65
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Anal Canal - injuries
Autopsy - instrumentation - methods
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Colposcopes
Female
Forensic Nursing - instrumentation - methods
Genitalia, Female - injuries
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Physical Examination - instrumentation - methods - nursing
Postmortem Changes
Rape - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The identification and interpretation of anogenital findings postmortem is a critical component of a sex-related homicide investigation. The use of a colposcope to assist in identifying anogenital injuries in living sexual assault victims is well established. The use of a colposcope for postmortem anogenital examination has been briefly mentioned in a few publications, however, no studies were found regarding the types and sites of postmortem anogenital injuries identified with a colposcope in sex-related homicide cases. The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic, physical examination, and victim-suspect relationship characteristics of sex-related homicides in Alaska. Genital findings in living and deceased sexual assault victims in Alaska were compared.
Given the results of this study, postmortem sexual assault examinations should be conducted in all suspected intimate partner homicides. Further implications for forensic nursing practice and recommendations for future research are discussed.
PubMed ID
20507418 View in PubMed
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Visualizing sexual assault: an exploration of the use of optical technologies in the medico-legal context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154545
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jan;68(1):1-8; discussion 9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Deborah White
Janice Du Mont
Author Affiliation
Sociology, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Dr., Peterborough, Ontario, Canada K9J 6S7. deborahwhite2@trentu.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jan;68(1):1-8; discussion 9-11
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Colposcopy
Documentation
Female
Focus Groups
Forensic Nursing - instrumentation - methods
Hospital Units
Humans
Judicial Role
Ontario
Photography
Physical Examination - instrumentation - methods
Rape - diagnosis - legislation & jurisprudence
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Wounds and Injuries - diagnosis - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This article is an exploration of the visualization of sexual assault in the context of adult women. In investigating the production of visual evidence, we outline the evolution of the specialized knowledge of medico-legal experts and describe the optical technologies involved in medical forensic examinations. We theorize that the principles and practices characterizing medicine, science and the law are mirrored in the medico-legal response to sexual assault. More specifically, we suggest that the demand for visual proof underpins the positivist approach taken in the pursuit of legal truth and that the generation of such evidence is based on producing discrete and decontextualized empirical facts through what are perceived to be objective technologies. Drawing on interview and focus group data with 14 sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs) in Ontario, Canada, we examine perceptions and experiences of the role of the visual in sexual assault. Certain of their comments appear to lend support to our theoretical assumptions, indicating a sense of the institutional overemphasis placed on physical damage to sexually assaulted women's bodies and the drive towards the increased technologization of visual evidence documentation. They also noted that physical injuries are frequently absent and that those observed through more refined tools of microvisualization such as colposcopes may be explained away as having resulted from either vigorous consensual sex or a "trivial" sexual assault. Concerns were expressed regarding the possibly problematic ways in which either the lack or particular nature of visual evidence may play out in the legal context. The process of documenting external and internal injuries created for some an uncomfortable sense of fragmenting and objectifying the bodies of those women they must simultaneously care for. We point to the need for further research to enhance our understanding of this issue.
PubMed ID
18952339 View in PubMed
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