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Acculturation and socialization: voices of internationally educated nurses in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77756
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Sochan A.
Singh M D
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, York, Canada. asochan@yorku.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
China - ethnology
Communication
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Philippines - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Socialization
Ukraine - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper describes a study that explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in their efforts to gain entry to practice as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. AIM: The aim was to uncover, in part, the issues related to professional nursing credentialling. METHODS: This study was guided by a biographical narrative (qualitative) research methodology. A convenience sample of 12 IEN students volunteered for this study representing the Philippines, Mainland China, Korea, Ukraine and India. FINDINGS: The findings were that the IENs progress through a three-phase journey in their quest for licensure in Ontario. These phases include: (1) hope - wanting the Canadian dream of becoming an RN in Ontario; (2) disillusionment - discovering that their home-country nursing qualifications do not meet Ontario RN entry to practice; and (3) navigating disillusionment - living the redefined Canadian dream by returning to nursing school to upgrade their nursing qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: Professional regulatory nursing bodies and nursing educators, as well as practising nurses, must be aware of the potentially confusing and unpleasant processes IENs go through as they qualify for the privilege of practising nursing in Ontario.
PubMed ID
17492985 View in PubMed
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Denmark's education project for nurse refugees from ex-Yugoslavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211987
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 1996 May-Jun;43(3):93
Publication Type
Article
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 1996 May-Jun;43(3):93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Foreign Professional Personnel - education
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Pilot Projects
Refugees
Societies, Nursing
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
With the phenomenal rise in displaced persons and refugees, ICN has been encouraging its member associations to join up with international and local agencies to answer their health and social needs, with particular emphasis on assisting nurse refugees with their problems both as refugees and as nurses. An example of how one member responded to the call is outlined below.
PubMed ID
8773541 View in PubMed
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Educating international nurses: curricular innovation through a bachelor of science in nursing bridging program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166499
Source
Nurse Educ. 2006 Nov-Dec;31(6):244-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sue Coffey
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. scoffey@yorku.ca
Source
Nurse Educ. 2006 Nov-Dec;31(6):244-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Professional, Retraining - organization & administration
Emigration and Immigration
Foreign Professional Personnel - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Licensure, Nursing
Mentors - psychology
Models, Educational
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Abstract
A curricular innovation was designed to provide internationally educated nurses with access to nursing licensure and employment. Through a program that includes professionally relevant English language support, mentorship, academic upgrading, workplace experiences, and clinical skills support, a mechanism has been created for internationally educated nurses to earn a bachelor of science in nursing degree and overcome barriers to practicing their profession.
PubMed ID
17108786 View in PubMed
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Foreign-trained dentists' perceived knowledge and skills after graduation from a structured two-year program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132327
Source
J Dent Educ. 2011 Aug;75(8):1098-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Stanley Kogon
David W Banting
Harinder Sandhu
Author Affiliation
School of Dentistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1, Canada. stan.kogon@schulich.uwo.ca
Source
J Dent Educ. 2011 Aug;75(8):1098-106
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Certification
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Dental
Education, Professional, Retraining
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Self Efficacy
Self-Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
In this survey study, graduates of the University of Western Ontario program for foreign-trained dentists from 1999 to 2009 were asked for their perceptions of their knowledge and skill in fourteen clinical topic areas before they were admitted to the program and after graduation. Their ratings were made on a ten-point visual analog scale divided into three aptitude domains: competent, proficient, and master/expert. Definitions of each domain were provided. The majority of the respondents felt that their knowledge level improved at least one aptitude level in only four of the fourteen (29 percent) topic areas but that their skill level had increased at least one aptitude level in nine (64 percent) topic areas. Of note, clinical topics with content reflective of North American dental practice such as oral medicine and treatment planning, ethics, regulated dentistry, record keeping, and informed consent were the topic areas in which most respondents reported an improvement in both their knowledge and skill. It is suggested that programs evaluating or providing gap training for internationally trained dentists consider mandatory inclusion of these topics.
PubMed ID
21828304 View in PubMed
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Internationally educated nurses: profiling workforce diversity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149378
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2009 Jun;56(2):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Jennifer Blythe
Andrea Baumann
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. blytheje@mcmaster.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2009 Jun;56(2):191-7
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - statistics & numerical data
Employment - organization & administration
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology - supply & distribution
Health services needs and demand
Humans
International Cooperation
Licensure, Nursing
Middle Aged
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology - supply & distribution
Ontario
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Professional Practice Location
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Abstract
Nurses with diverse educational and cultural backgrounds are likely to adapt differently to new workforces. The aim of this study was to provide a profile of nurses educated in different countries who are employed in a major settlement jurisdiction.
Despite difficulties in measuring its magnitude, it is evident that nurse migration has increased as a result of globalization. Major destinations for internationally educated nurses (IENs) include the USA, Canada, the UK, Australia and the Gulf States. Chief donor countries include the Philippines, India and other South Asian countries. Half of all IENs registered in Canada work in the province of Ontario.
Published literature and secondary data were used to profile cohorts of nurses educated in different countries who are employed in the Ontario workforce.
Statistics available on IENs in Ontario reveal a largely urban settlement pattern. There are major differences among IEN cohorts in terms of age, gender, work status, and type and place of employment.
Although IENs resident in Ontario could not be quantified, a relatively detailed description of IENs in the workforce was possible. Comparison of nurse cohorts indicated that generalizations about IENs should be made with caution. Changes in regulatory conditions have a significant effect on IEN employment. Difficulties associated with international educational and regulatory differences illustrate the need to create global nursing standards. Further investigation of differences in workforce profiles should provide insights leading to improved utilization of IENs.
PubMed ID
19646168 View in PubMed
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Is the grass any greener? Canada to United States of America nurse migration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149377
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2009 Jun;56(2):198-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
L. McGillis Hall
G H Pink
C B Jones
P. Leatt
M. Gates
J. Peterson
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON Canada. l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2009 Jun;56(2):198-205
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Career Mobility
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology - supply & distribution
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
United States
Abstract
Little or no attempt has been made to determine why nurses leave Canada, remain outside of Canada, or under what circumstances might return to Canada. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of Canadian-educated registered nurses working in the USA.
Data for this study include the 1996, 2000 and 2004 USA National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses and reports from the same time period from the Canadian Institute for Health Information.
This research demonstrates that full-time work opportunities and the potential for ongoing education are key factors that contribute to the migration of Canadian nurses to the USA. In addition, Canada appears to be losing baccalaureate-prepared nurses to the USA.
These findings underscore how health care policy decisions such as workforce retention strategies can have a direct influence on the nursing workforce. Policy emphasis should be on providing incentives for Canadian-educated nurses to stay in Canada, and obtain full-time work while continuing to develop professionally.
Findings from this study provide policy leaders with important information regarding employment options of interest to migrating nurses.
This study describes and contrasts nurses in the data set, thus providing information on the context of nurse migration from Canada to the USA. Data utilized in this study are cross-sectional in nature, thus the opportunity to follow individual nurses over time was not possible.
PubMed ID
19646169 View in PubMed
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Nurse migration to Canada: pathways and pitfalls of workforce integration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153003
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2009 Apr;20(2):202-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Jennifer Blythe
Andrea Baumann
Ann Rhéaume
Karen McIntosh
Author Affiliation
Nursing Health Services Research Unit, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2009 Apr;20(2):202-10
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Career Mobility
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - psychology
Focus Groups
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology - supply & distribution
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Licensure, Nursing
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Abstract
Many internationally educated nurses (IENs) find it difficult to reinstate themselves in their profession after migration. This article explores factors contributing to the success and failure of IENs to reestablish professional careers. The article discusses a study involving 39 IENs in 5 focus groups and 10 interviews. In all, 29 interviews are held with other stakeholders. IENs encounter obstacles at each stage of the migration process. New strategies are required to assist IENs to reenter the workforce. Given the consistent predictions of an extreme nurse shortage, it is important that the brain waste of immigrant nurses be minimized.
PubMed ID
19164651 View in PubMed
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Ontario's internationally educated nurses and waste in human capital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149379
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2009 Jun;56(2):184-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
B. Kolawole
Author Affiliation
Hematology/Oncology Unit, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada. kolawolebukola@yahoo.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2009 Jun;56(2):184-90
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency - education
Developing Countries
Educational Measurement
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - statistics & numerical data
Employment - organization & administration
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - supply & distribution
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Licensure, Nursing
Multilingualism
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Ontario
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Professional Competence
Refugees - education - statistics & numerical data
World Health
Abstract
To analyse critically the waste in human capital of Ontario's internationally educated nurses resulting from unemployment or underemployment.
Globalization of the nursing workforce is resulting in more and more internationally educated nurses migrating to Canada every year. In Ontario, internationally educated nurses represent 11% of the total nursing workforce but many are unable to become registered in Ontario. According to the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO), 40% of internationally educated nurse applicants never complete the application process and thus never become Registered Nurses in Ontario. Systemic barriers that prevent registration in Ontario can result from any of the seven requirements for completing the application process. The inability of internationally educated nurses to become registered is significant, considering the national and global nursing shortage. In addition, the inability to become registered results in tremendous waste of human capital, especially in developing countries that have invested financially in educating nurses. Although several programmes have been implemented in Ontario for internationally educated nurses, barriers exist in the design and administration of these programmes, and these are described.
An opinion piece of international interest and a human interest piece.
Internationally educated nurses face significant barriers, which prevent their integration into the Ontario healthcare system. Several policy and management strategies are outlined that could be implemented to ease their integration into the Ontario healthcare system.
PubMed ID
19646167 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.