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Acculturation and socialization: voices of internationally educated nurses in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77756
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Sochan A.
Singh M D
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, York University, York, Canada. asochan@yorku.ca
Source
Int Nurs Rev. 2007 Jun;54(2):130-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
China - ethnology
Communication
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Education, Professional, Retraining
Emigration and Immigration
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - education - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
India - ethnology
Korea - ethnology
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Ontario
Personnel Selection
Philippines - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Socialization
Ukraine - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper describes a study that explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in their efforts to gain entry to practice as Registered Nurses (RNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. AIM: The aim was to uncover, in part, the issues related to professional nursing credentialling. METHODS: This study was guided by a biographical narrative (qualitative) research methodology. A convenience sample of 12 IEN students volunteered for this study representing the Philippines, Mainland China, Korea, Ukraine and India. FINDINGS: The findings were that the IENs progress through a three-phase journey in their quest for licensure in Ontario. These phases include: (1) hope - wanting the Canadian dream of becoming an RN in Ontario; (2) disillusionment - discovering that their home-country nursing qualifications do not meet Ontario RN entry to practice; and (3) navigating disillusionment - living the redefined Canadian dream by returning to nursing school to upgrade their nursing qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: Professional regulatory nursing bodies and nursing educators, as well as practising nurses, must be aware of the potentially confusing and unpleasant processes IENs go through as they qualify for the privilege of practising nursing in Ontario.
PubMed ID
17492985 View in PubMed
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Ambiguity and paradox in outpost nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1146
Source
International Nursing Review. 1982 Jul-Aug; 29(4):108-111,117.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
Hodgson, C.
Author Affiliation
McMaster University
Source
International Nursing Review. 1982 Jul-Aug; 29(4):108-111,117.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nursing stations
Acculturation
Health services
Traditional healing
Attitudes
Canada
Community Health Nursing
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Foreign Professional Personnel
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Rural Health
Stress, Psychological
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1634.
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Source
Nurs Stand. 2008 Oct 1-7;23(4):62-4
Publication Type
Article

Canadian strategies to stabilize the work force.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152040
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Macdonald-Rencz
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Office of Nursing Policy, Canada.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):53-5
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Canada
Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - trends
Forecasting
Foreign Professional Personnel - supply & distribution
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Medically underserved area
Nurses - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection - trends
Abstract
Today's globalized economy creates opportunities for health professionals but corresponding challenges for countries facing significant shortages of these professionals. The uneven playing field between developed and developing countries hampers the latter in recruiting and retaining trained professionals to oversee and maintain their health systems. Given the salary differentials and variance in working conditions between developed and developing countries, developing countries may lack the pull factors to keep their nurses and doctors from emigrating. However, many developed countries have made significant investments to address this challenge.
Notes
Comment On: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):24-5019289910
PubMed ID
19289912 View in PubMed
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Canadian-trained nurses in North Carolina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179375
Source
Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):suppl 2-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
George H Pink
Linda McGillis Hall
Peggy Leatt
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Administration, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1101 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. gpink@email.unc.edu
Source
Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):suppl 2-11
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel
Humans
Licensure
Male
Middle Aged
North Carolina
Nurses - supply & distribution
Abstract
Little is known about nurses who leave Canada to work in the US. The main purpose of this study is to gain some insight into the emigration component of nursing supply and demand by comparing characteristics of nurses who left Canada to nurses who stayed. Specifically, Canadian-trained RNs who work in the state of North Carolina are compared to RNs who work in Canada. Results show that there are 40% more Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina than there are in Prince Edward Island. A higher percentage of Canadian-trained RNs in North Carolina are male, under 40 years of age, have baccalaureate training and graduated less than 10 years ago. Canadian-trained nurses in both countries have very low rates of unemployment. The loss of Canadian-trained RNs to the US is a significant problem, and there is an urgent need to obtain a better understanding of why nurses leave the country.
Notes
Comment In: Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-916078391
PubMed ID
15230179 View in PubMed
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Casting a wide net: foreign-born workers are essential to the healthcare industry--if you can jump through the hoops to recruit them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177333
Source
Healthc Leadersh Rep. 2004 Sep;12(9):1, 5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004

77 records – page 1 of 8.