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Esophageal foreign bodies in children. 15-year review of 484 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226592
Source
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1991 Apr;100(4 Pt 1):320-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
W S Crysdale
K S Sendi
J. Yoo
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1991 Apr;100(4 Pt 1):320-4
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Esophagus
Female
Foreign Bodies - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The findings of a retrospective analysis of the charts of 426 children admitted on 484 occasions with diagnoses of esophageal foreign bodies that were managed at the Hospital for Sick Children for 15 years to the end of 1989 are reported. In the majority of cases, ingestion of the foreign body was either witnessed or suspected. Removal was completed with the use of general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in 90% of cases. The postcricoid area was the commonest site for impaction. Coins were the commonest foreign body. Approximately 5% of children had more than one foreign body. Fifty-nine children had esophageal anomalies. Thoracotomy or laparotomy for the retrieval of foreign bodies was necessary in less than 1% of patients. Complications occurred in 13% of patients; there were no deaths.
PubMed ID
2018291 View in PubMed
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Introduction of a Canadian dollar coin has created a new health hazard for children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219750
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1993 Dec;22(6):428-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
M D Schloss
O. Terraza
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolarynology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1993 Dec;22(6):428-30
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Esophagus
Female
Foreign Bodies - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Abstract
Coins have remained at the top of the incidence list of published series of endoscopic removal of pediatric foreign bodies. The introduction of the Canadian dollar coin in 1987 has presented another hazard for children. A total of 228 consecutive pediatric patients that underwent esophagoscopy for removal of foreign body from 1979 to 1989 are reviewed. Esophagoscopy under general anesthesia is the safest technique for the removal of impacted foreign bodies in the esophagus.
PubMed ID
8158738 View in PubMed
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Tracheobronchial foreign bodies. A persistent problem in pediatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230879
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1989 May;143(5):543-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
H. Puhakka
E. Svedström
P. Kero
P. Valli
E. Iisalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1989 May;143(5):543-5
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchi
Bronchoscopes
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fiber Optic Technology - instrumentation
Finland
Foreign Bodies - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Retrospective Studies
Trachea
Abstract
Extraction of a foreign body from the tracheobronchial tree was accomplished for 83 children. The mean age was 1 year 9 months for the 27 girls and 3 years 1 month for the 56 boys; 46 children (55%) were younger than 2 years of age. Sixteen (19%) of the foreign bodies were radiopaque, and 35 (42%) were either verified or suspected radiologically before endoscopy. Forty-one foreign bodies (49%) were situated in the right bronchial tree. Extraction was successful in 81 children (98%) and was performed on 50 children (60%) during the first 24 hours. Twenty-five (30%) of the foreign bodies were peanuts. Three children experienced a residual foreign body, without serious complications. We believe that an open tube bronchoscopy should be performed whenever abnormal stridor or cough is observed in a healthy child and when appropriate antibiotic therapy is unsuccessful.
PubMed ID
2718986 View in PubMed
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