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1878 records – page 1 of 188.

10 times as many prostate cancers in 2021?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133774
Source
Manag Care. 2011 May;20(5):51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Source
Manag Care. 2011 May;20(5):51
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
PubMed ID
21667630 View in PubMed
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17-year follow-up of symptoms and signs in the knee joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14565
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(5):325-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J. Isacson
E. Allander
L A Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(5):325-31
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Knee Joint - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Locomotion
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatoid Factor - analysis
Abstract
A population survey was carried out in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1967. In a sample of 15,268 individuals, 239 were found to have rheumatoid arthritis according to the New York diagnostic criteria. In 1983, i.e. 17 years later, 109 of the 127 individuals still living were reexamined. Among these, 79 complained of knee symptoms and 30 stated that the knee was the joint that presented the greatest hindrance to walking. Fifty-nine found difficulty in walking up or down stairs and 47 had to use a walking aid. These shortcomings were more often noted in the knees that had been swollen, or painful, 17 years previously. In addition, at follow-up, narrowing of the articular space was observed in the knees that were swollen and painful. Valgus deformity was associated with swelling, while varus deformity also involved, apart from the swelling, pain and restricted motility. In all, 108 operations were performed on 48 of the 109 subjects who were re-examined; 12 of these were knee operations.
PubMed ID
3212404 View in PubMed
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17-year trends in incidence and prognosis of cardiogenic shock in patients with acute myocardial infarction in western Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269417
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Apr 15;185:256-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2015
Author
B. Redfors
O. Angerås
T. Råmunddal
C. Dworeck
I. Haraldsson
D. Ioanes
P. Petursson
B. Libungan
J. Odenstedt
J. Stewart
E. Lodin
M. Wahlin
P. Albertsson
G. Matejka
E. Omerovic
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Apr 15;185:256-62
Date
Apr-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Electrocardiography
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Shock, Cardiogenic - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cardiogenic shock remains the leading cause of in hospital death in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and is associated with a mortality rate of approximately 50%. Here we investigated the 17-year trends in incidence and prognosis of AMI-induced cardiogenic shock in Västra Götaland in western Sweden, an area with approximately 1.6 million inhabitants. The study period includes the transition from thrombolysis to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as the region-wide therapy of choice for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).
Data on patients hospitalized in cardiac care units in Västra Götaland, Sweden between 1995 and 2013 were obtained from the Swedish Websystem for Enhancement of Evidence-based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART). We determined the incidence of cardiogenic shock among patients diagnosed with AMI and the risk of death associated with developing cardiogenic shock. We fitted logistic regression models to study which factors predicted post-AMI cardiogenic shock. Analyses were performed on complete case data as well as after multiple imputation of missing data.
Incidence of cardiogenic shock as a complication of AMI declined in western Sweden in the past decade, from 14% in 1995 to 4% in 2012. The risk of dying once cardiogenic shock had developed increased during the study period (p
PubMed ID
25814213 View in PubMed
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[20 years' experience with kidney transplantation in Stockholm].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235401
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
C G Groth
L. Ost
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Date
Apr-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cyclosporins - therapeutic use
Forecasting
Graft Rejection - drug effects
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - surgery
Kidney Transplantation
Postoperative Complications - surgery
Reoperation
Sweden
Abstract
Renal transplantations have now been carried out at our hospital for just over 20 years. The results have gradually improved and are now very satisfactory. There are many explanations for this development, but the improvement in immunosuppression has probably been the most crucial development. Renal transplantation is cheaper and it provides greater wellbeing for the patient than does chronic dialysis treatment. The indications have been widened and the number of patients waiting for a new kidney is increasing. An improved retrieval of cadaveric kidneys will be necessary for the required expansion of kidney transplantation programmes.
PubMed ID
3307211 View in PubMed
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A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
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Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
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40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289324
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
06-2016
Author
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Veikko Salomaa
Arto Pietilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Health, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: pekka.jousilahti@thl.fi.
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Public Health
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared.
PubMed ID
27242088 View in PubMed
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1991 Magadan, USSR/Alaska, USA Dental Exchange Program Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75799
Source
Alaska Med. 1992 Jan-Mar;34(1):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
R J Allen
M H Cangemi
C F Craft
Source
Alaska Med. 1992 Jan-Mar;34(1):59-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Dental Health Services
Forecasting
International Educational Exchange - trends
Referral and Consultation
USSR
Abstract
In August 1991, three rural Alaska Public Health dentists made a professionally significant return visit to the Soviet Far East. The city of Magadan was the site for the first actual demonstration of portable American dental equipment and treatment techniques in this remote region of Russia. This exchange was held at several clinical locations and took place during the time of the attempted USSR government coup.
PubMed ID
1605343 View in PubMed
Less detail

1878 records – page 1 of 188.