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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Classification of grossly detectable abnormalities and conditions seen at postmortem in Canadian poultry abattoirs according to a hazard identification decision tree.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192061
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Dec;64(12):1973-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J R Bisaillon
T E Feltmate
S. Sheffield
R. Julian
E. Todd
C. Poppe
S. Quessy
Author Affiliation
Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Food Safety Risk Analysis Unit, Animal Disease Research Institute, Nepean, Ontario. jbisaillon@inspection.gc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Dec;64(12):1973-80
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Canada
Chickens - abnormalities - microbiology
Consumer Product Safety
Environmental Exposure
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Risk assessment
Safety
Abstract
This study was designed to review all grossly detectable abnormalities and conditions (GDACs) encountered in poultry in Canadian abattoirs to determine which have potential to cause adverse health effects for the consumer. Review of the literature and consultation with scientists in the field of microbiology, epidemiology, poultry pathology, chemistry, and meat inspection served to generate an inventory of GDACs, and a decision tree containing algorithms was developed to identify GDACs potentially representing a health hazard to consumers. Through the use of the decision tree, GDACs were classified into different categories with regard to the risk they represent to humans. A number of GDACs were identified as being of potential concern from a food safety perspective, namely Erysipelas, fowl cholera, Campylobacteriosis, clostridial diseases, hepatitis/enteritis associated with Helicobacter, Listeriosis, Salmonella infections (nontyphoid infections, Salmonella arizonae, pullorum disease, and fowl typhoid), Staphylococcosis, and Toxoplasmosis. Further characterization--i.e., hazard characterization, exposure assessment, and risk characterization--is required to quantify or better characterize the probability that products derived from affected carcasses may affect the consumer as well as the resulting consequences. Risk assessment is a dynamic process. Results presented in this paper are based on available information and expert opinion. As new information is obtained, the inventory of GDACs and their classification may be modified.
PubMed ID
11770626 View in PubMed
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CMAJ 2011 election survey: food safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134777
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E511-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2011
Author
Roger Collier
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E511-2
Date
Jun-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Food Safety
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Politics
PubMed ID
21543310 View in PubMed
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Development of a real-time PCR method coupled with a selective pre-enrichment step for quantification of Morganella morganii and Morganella psychrotolerans in fish products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267922
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2015 Jun 16;203:55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-2015
Author
Gaëtan Podeur
Paw Dalgaard
Francoise Leroi
Hervé Prévost
Jette Emborg
Jan Martinussen
Lars Hestbjerg Hansen
Marie-France Pilet
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2015 Jun 16;203:55-62
Date
Jun-16-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Culture Techniques
DNA Primers - genetics
Denmark
Fish Products - microbiology
Fishes - microbiology
Food Microbiology - methods
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Histamine - metabolism
Morganella - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Morganella morganii - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seafood - microbiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Histamine fish poisoning is common and due to toxic concentrations of histamine often produced by Gram-negative bacteria in fin-fish products with a high content of the free amino acid histidine. The genus Morganella includes two species previously reported to cause incidents of histamine fish poisoning. Morganella morganii and Morganella psychrotolerans are both strong producer of histamine. However, little is known about the occurrence and critical stages for fish contamination with these bacteria. To elucidate contamination routes of Morganella, specific real-time quantitative PCR (RTi qPCR) methods for quantification of M. morganii and M. psychrotolerans have been developed. Selective primers amplified a 110 bp region of the vasD gene for M. psychrotolerans and a 171 bp region of the galactokinase gene for M. morganii. These primer-sets showed high specificity as demonstrated by using purified DNA from 23 other histamine producing bacteria and 26 isolates with no or limited histamine production. The efficiency of the qPCR reactions on artificially contaminated fish samples were 100.8% and 96.3% respectively. The limit of quantification (LOQ) without enrichment was 4 log CFU/g. A quantitative enrichment step with a selective medium was included and improved the sensitivity of the methods to a LOQ of below 50 CFU/g in seafood. RTi qPCR methods with or without enrichment were evaluated for enumeration of Morganella species in naturally contaminated fresh fish and lightly preserved seafood from Denmark. These new methods will contribute to a better understanding of the occurrence and histamine production by Morganella species in fish products, information that is essential to reduce the unacceptably high frequency of histamine fish poisoning.
PubMed ID
25791250 View in PubMed
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Diverse Land Use and the Impact on (Irrigation) Water Quality and Need for Measures - A Case Study of a Norwegian River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269539
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Jun;12(6):6979-7001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Gro S Johannessen
Aina C Wennberg
Ingrid Nesheim
Ingun Tryland
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Jun;12(6):6979-7001
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agricultural Irrigation
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Norway
Rivers - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution - analysis
Water Quality
Abstract
Surface water is used for irrigation of food plants all over the World. Such water can be of variable hygienic quality, and can be contaminated from many different sources. The association of contaminated irrigation water with contamination of fresh produce is well established, and many outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with fresh produce consumption have been reported. The objective of the present study was to summarize the data on fecal indicators and selected bacterial pathogens to assess the level of fecal contamination of a Norwegian river used for irrigation in an area which has a high production level of various types of food commodities. Sources for fecal pollution of the river were identified. Measures implemented to reduce discharges from the wastewater sector and agriculture, and potential measures identified for future implementation are presented and discussed in relation to potential benefits and costs. It is important that the users of the water, independent of intended use, are aware of the hygienic quality and the potential interventions that may be applied. Our results suggest that contamination of surface water is a complex web of many factors and that several measures and interventions on different levels are needed to achieve a sound river and safe irrigation.
Notes
Cites: Water Res. 2002 Apr;36(7):1725-3412044072
Cites: J Appl Microbiol. 2004;96(4):787-9415012817
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Jun;12(6):6919-3226090606
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Oct 15;26(20):170-311211701
Cites: Water Res. 2002 Jan;36(1):275-8311766805
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Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Nov 1;408(23):5631-819464728
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Cites: Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2008 Jun;5(3):339-4918767979
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Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Dec;87(12):2032-59431298
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2002 May;68(5):2188-9711976088
PubMed ID
26090611 View in PubMed
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Food safety as seen by an epidemiologist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110579
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Jul 6;99(1):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-6-1968
Author
L e Riche WH
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Jul 6;99(1):22-7
Date
Jul-6-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Food Additives - toxicity
Food Inspection
Food Supply - standards
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Health Surveys
Herbicides - poisoning
Humans
Mass Screening
Pesticides - poisoning
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1966 Mar 7;195(10):830-312608167
Cites: JAMA. 1966 Jul 18;197(3):165-815214375
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1965;33(4):471-75294993
Cites: Br Med J. 1966 Feb 26;1(5486):514-65902696
Cites: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1966 Jul 15;149(2):145-505950435
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1967 May;113(5):616-96024867
Cites: Science. 1967 Sep 1;157(3792):1006-104166636
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Aug 19;97(8):367-734166785
Cites: J Air Pollut Control Assoc. 1967 Apr;17(4):203-96038466
Cites: Lancet. 1964 Mar 7;1(7332):527-914100187
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1964 Jan;60:100-1014106730
Cites: JAMA. 1964 Jun 15;188:976-8314132576
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1964 Jul 2;271:30-614148227
Cites: Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1964 Nov-Dec;5:737-5214226191
Cites: AMA Arch Ind Health. 1955 Nov;12(5):494-50213268068
Cites: Lancet. 1959 Dec 5;2(7110):1019-2113831987
PubMed ID
5663002 View in PubMed
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Hospitals accept the HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202047
Source
Healthc Foodserv. 1998 Oct-Nov;8(3):12, 16
Publication Type
Article

[Improvement in the hygiene training of workers in public eating establishments and the foodstuffs trade].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202466
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 Jan-Feb;(1):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M I Krasil'shchikov
M V Potekhina
E V Gavrilenko
M G Nemets
Iu A Bochkov
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 Jan-Feb;(1):25-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Handling
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Hygiene - education
Occupational Health
Restaurants
Russia
Abstract
Experience gained in the hygienic training of those who are engaged at public catering enterprises and grocery stores in different regions of the Russian Federation is presented. Hygienic training courses have been set up in the State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance centers. Programs for training workers at public catering enterprises and grocery stores have been approved by the board and the Russian Federation State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance Committee and the Trade Committee of the Russian Federation.
PubMed ID
10199072 View in PubMed
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Improving epidemic control: lessons from the 1987 toxic mussels affair.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222550
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Dec 15;147(12):1769-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1992
Author
T. Kosatsky
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Dec 15;147(12):1769-72
Date
Dec-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bivalvia
Disease Outbreaks
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Quebec - epidemiology
Shellfish Poisoning
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Jun 21;322(25):1775-801971709
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1990 Sep;16 Suppl 1E:3-42101737
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Mar 15;146(6):1033, 1036-71544060
PubMed ID
1458418 View in PubMed
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Integration of hygiene into food technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103526
Source
Bibl Nutr Dieta. 1990;(47):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

23 records – page 1 of 3.