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An outbreak of Campylobacter jejuni associated with consumption of chicken, Copenhagen, 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168945
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(5):137-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
A. Mazick
S. Ethelberg
E Møller Nielsen
K. Mølbak
M. Lisby
Author Affiliation
European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET), Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(5):137-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Campylobacter jejuni - isolation & purification
Chickens - microbiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
In May/June 2005 an outbreak of diarrhoeal illness occurred among company employees in Copenhagen. Cases were reported from seven of eight companies that received food from the same catering kitchen. Stool specimens from three patients from two companies were positive for Campylobacter jejuni. We performed a retrospective cohort study among employees exposed to canteen food in the three largest companies to identify the source of the outbreak and to prevent further spread. Using self-administered questionnaires we collected information on disease, days of canteen food eaten and food items consumed. The catering kitchen was inspected and food samples were taken. Questionnaires were returned by 295/348 (85%) employees. Of 247 employees who ate canteen food, 79 were cases, and the attack rate (AR) was 32%. Consuming canteen food on 25 May was associated with illness (AR 75/204, RR=3.2, 95%CI 1.3-8.2). Consumption of chicken salad on this day, but not other types of food, was associated with illness (AR=43/97, RR=2.3, 95%CI 1.3-4.1). Interviews with kitchen staff indicated the likelihood of cross-contamination from raw chicken to the chicken salad during storage. This is the first recognised major Campylobacter outbreak associated with contaminated chicken documented in Denmark. It is plausible that food handling practices contributed to transmission, and awareness of safe food handling and storage has since been raised among kitchen staff. The low number of positive specimens accrued in this outbreak suggests a general underascertainment of adult cases in the laboratory reporting system by a factor of 20.
Notes
Erratum In: Euro Surveill. 2006 May;11(5):1 p following 139
PubMed ID
16757851 View in PubMed
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Bacillus cereus phage typing as an epidemiological tool in outbreaks of food poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215729
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Mar;33(3):636-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
R. Ahmed
P. Sankar-Mistry
S. Jackson
H W Ackermann
S S Kasatiya
Author Affiliation
Ontario Public Health Laboratory, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Mar;33(3):636-40
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacillus Phages - ultrastructure
Bacillus cereus - classification
Bacillus thuringiensis - classification
Bacteriophage Typing
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
Bacillus cereus is responsible for an increasing number of food poisoning cases. By using 12 bacteriophages isolated from sewage, a typing scheme for B. cereus isolates from outbreaks or sporadic cases of food poisoning was developed. The phages belonged to three morphotypes. Ten phages with contractile tails and icosahedral heads were members of the Myoviridae family, and two phages with noncontractile tails belonged to the Siphoviridae family. Phage 11 represented a new species. It had an isometric head and a very long contractile tail with long wavy tail fibers and was one of the largest viruses known. The vast majority of 166 B. cereus strains (161, or 97%) isolated from food poisoning cases were typeable. Of 146 strains isolated from 18 outbreaks, 142 (97%) could be divided into 17 phage types. A good correlation, on the order of 80 to 100%, between phage types of strains isolated from suspected foods and those of strains isolated from stools of symptomatic patients was observed. Most Bacillus thuringiensis strains were also typeable, providing further evidence of the close relatedness of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This phage typing scheme can be a valuable epidemiological tool in tracing the origins of food poisoning caused by B. cereus.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7751369 View in PubMed
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Campylobacter coli - an important foodborne pathogen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184580
Source
J Infect. 2003 Jul;47(1):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
C C Tam
S J O'Brien
G K Adak
S M Meakins
J A Frost
Author Affiliation
Gastrointestinal Diseases Division, Public Health Laboratory Service, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, 61 Colindale Avenue, NW9 5EQ, London, UK. clarence.tam@phls.org.uk
Source
J Infect. 2003 Jul;47(1):28-32
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Campylobacter coli - isolation & purification
England - epidemiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Campylobacters are the most common bacterial cause of infectious intestinal disease (IID) in temperate countries. C. jejuni is the predominant cause of campylobacter IID, but the impact of other, less prevalent species has largely been ignored. Here, we present estimates of the burden of indigenously acquired foodborne disease (IFD) due to Campylobacter coli, the second most common cause of human campylobacteriosis.
Data from surveillance sources and specific epidemiologic studies were used to calculate the number of illnesses, presentations to general practice (GP), hospital admissions, hospital occupancy and deaths due to indigenous foodborne C. coli IID in England and Wales for the year 2000.
We estimate that in the year 2000, C. coli accounted for over 25,000 cases of IFD. This organism was responsible for more than 12,000 presentations to GP, 1000 hospital admissions, nearly 4000 bed days of hospital occupancy and 11 deaths. The cost to patients and the National Health Service was estimated at nearly pound 4 million.
Although C. coli comprises a minority of human campylobacter disease, its health burden is considerable and greater than previously thought. Targeted research on this organism is required for its successful control.
PubMed ID
12850159 View in PubMed
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Chinese-style barbecued meats: a public health challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196542
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Sep-Oct;91(5):386-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Ying
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion and Environmental Protection Office, Toronto Public Health, ON. jying@city.toronto.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Sep-Oct;91(5):386-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada - epidemiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Food Contamination - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Food Handling
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Public Health
Abstract
The custom of displaying Chinese-style barbecued meats at room temperature has been a controversial food safety issue in North America. This article is intended to facilitate development of a risk-based food safety policy for this unique food by providing a brief overview of the recent study findings and Canadian disease surveillance data. Despite the lack of temperature control after cooking, Chinese barbecued meats were rarely implicated in foodborne incidents in Canada between 1975 and 1993. This might be due to the food's ability to delay pathogen growth during the first 5 hours immediately after cooking, and the conventional trade practices of separating the retail area from the main kitchen (i.e., reducing risk of cross-contamination). However, recent studies also pointed out the high potential for cross-contamination during the retail stage (i.e., chopping and packaging the food) as a result of lack of proper hand-washing and equipment sanitation. A risk-based food safety policy is proposed.
PubMed ID
11089295 View in PubMed
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[Clinico-epidemiological characteristics of diseases caused by halophilic vibrios along the coast of the Sea of Azov].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235046
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Jul;(7):23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1987
Author
V A Shikulov
A E Libinzon
G F Mitsevich
I A Koval'chuk
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Jul;(7):23-5
Date
Jul-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Fish Products
Fisheries
Fishes
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Russia
Seawater
Vibrio - isolation & purification
Vibrio Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Abstract
The epidemiological and clinical features of alimentary toxinfections caused by halophilic vibrios on the Crimean coast of the Sea of Azov at the period of 1976-1984 were studied. Toxinfections were linked mainly with the use of sea-food subjected to different kinds of culinary treatment and took the course of gastroenteritis. To prevent toxinfections caused by halophilic vibrios, the technology, as well as sanitary and hygienic norms, should be strictly observed in the production of sea-food; besides, special methods of bacteriological diagnosis should be introduced into practice at laboratories of medical institutions and fish-processing plants.
PubMed ID
2960107 View in PubMed
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Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119535
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e46162
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Päivi Lahti
Miia Lindström
Panu Somervuo
Annamari Heikinheimo
Hannu Korkeala
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene and Environmental Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. paivi.lahti@helsinki.fi
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e46162
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cellobiose - genetics - metabolism
Chromosomes, Bacterial
Clostridium Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Clostridium perfringens - classification - genetics - metabolism
Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Enterotoxins - genetics - metabolism
Ethanolamine - metabolism
Finland - epidemiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Genes, Bacterial
Genotype
Humans
Inositol - genetics - metabolism
Multigene Family
Phylogeny
Plasmids
Serotyping
Abstract
Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23094024 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.