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131 records – page 1 of 14.

[An outbreak of acute intestinal infections in general education schools (1)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204194
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Jul-Aug;(4):113-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu P Solodovnikov
N N Filatov
V A Pisareva
Author Affiliation
Centre of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Jul-Aug;(4):113-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Moscow - epidemiology
Schools
PubMed ID
9783417 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Campylobacter jejuni associated with consumption of chicken, Copenhagen, 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168945
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(5):137-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
A. Mazick
S. Ethelberg
E Møller Nielsen
K. Mølbak
M. Lisby
Author Affiliation
European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET), Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(5):137-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Campylobacter jejuni - isolation & purification
Chickens - microbiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
In May/June 2005 an outbreak of diarrhoeal illness occurred among company employees in Copenhagen. Cases were reported from seven of eight companies that received food from the same catering kitchen. Stool specimens from three patients from two companies were positive for Campylobacter jejuni. We performed a retrospective cohort study among employees exposed to canteen food in the three largest companies to identify the source of the outbreak and to prevent further spread. Using self-administered questionnaires we collected information on disease, days of canteen food eaten and food items consumed. The catering kitchen was inspected and food samples were taken. Questionnaires were returned by 295/348 (85%) employees. Of 247 employees who ate canteen food, 79 were cases, and the attack rate (AR) was 32%. Consuming canteen food on 25 May was associated with illness (AR 75/204, RR=3.2, 95%CI 1.3-8.2). Consumption of chicken salad on this day, but not other types of food, was associated with illness (AR=43/97, RR=2.3, 95%CI 1.3-4.1). Interviews with kitchen staff indicated the likelihood of cross-contamination from raw chicken to the chicken salad during storage. This is the first recognised major Campylobacter outbreak associated with contaminated chicken documented in Denmark. It is plausible that food handling practices contributed to transmission, and awareness of safe food handling and storage has since been raised among kitchen staff. The low number of positive specimens accrued in this outbreak suggests a general underascertainment of adult cases in the laboratory reporting system by a factor of 20.
Notes
Erratum In: Euro Surveill. 2006 May;11(5):1 p following 139
PubMed ID
16757851 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of food poisoning at a children's rest center (epidemiological practice No. 6)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213373
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1996 Jan-Feb;(1):105-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu P Solodovnikov
S V Serzhenko
L I Pozdeeva
Author Affiliation
Moscow-city Center of the State Committee of Sanitary and Epidemiology Surveillance, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1996 Jan-Feb;(1):105-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Camping
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Rest
Russia - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8820693 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of severe paralytic shellfish poisoning in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220659
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1993 Jul 15;19(13):99-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1993
Author
E. Todd
G. Avery
G A Grant
J C Fenwick
R. Chiang
T. Babiuk
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Health Protection Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1993 Jul 15;19(13):99-102
Date
Jul-15-1993
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Paralysis - epidemiology - etiology
Shellfish Poisoning
PubMed ID
8358370 View in PubMed
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[A rare epidemic outbreak of acute intestinal infections among adults (Part 1)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203203
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Nov-Dec;(6):113-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
A T Tibekin
Iu P Solodovnikov
N N Filatov
O B Kobzeva
M V Ermolenko
L I Artamonova
Author Affiliation
Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance Center, Eastern Administrative District of Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Nov-Dec;(6):113-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Disease Outbreaks
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
PubMed ID
9949523 View in PubMed
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Association of Food Premises Inspection and Disclosure Program with retail-acquired foodborne illness and operator noncompliance in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161551
Source
J Environ Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;70(1):54-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tino Serapiglia
Erin Kennedy
Sylvanus Thompson
Ron de Burger
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health, Ontario. tserapi@toronto.ca
Source
J Environ Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;70(1):54-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual
Disclosure
Food Supply - standards
Food Technology - standards
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Incidence
Ontario
Risk Management - methods
Abstract
In 2001, the city of Toronto was the only health unit in Canada to have implemented a multi-component disclosure system as part of its provincially mandated food safety program. To measure the impact on the ultimate goal of preventing foodborne illness, the authors of the study reported here assessed directly the association of Toronto Public Health's program with the specific incidence of retail-acquired foodborne illness by analyzing secondary data on reportable local enteric disease. In addition, the study indirectly measured prevention of retail-acquired foodborne illness by assessing existing data on regulatory compliance in Toronto food premises as an inherent performance indicator. Results of the statistical analysis show that although there has not been a significant difference in the overall incidence rate of retail foodborne illness (Chi-squared = 0.009, p = .93), certain key diseases, such as Campylobacter infection, have decreased significantly since the implementation of the disclosure program in Toronto. There has also been a significant trend in the reduction of operator noncompliance rates (Z = 32, p
PubMed ID
17802819 View in PubMed
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Bacillus cereus phage typing as an epidemiological tool in outbreaks of food poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215729
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Mar;33(3):636-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
R. Ahmed
P. Sankar-Mistry
S. Jackson
H W Ackermann
S S Kasatiya
Author Affiliation
Ontario Public Health Laboratory, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Mar;33(3):636-40
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacillus Phages - ultrastructure
Bacillus cereus - classification
Bacillus thuringiensis - classification
Bacteriophage Typing
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
Bacillus cereus is responsible for an increasing number of food poisoning cases. By using 12 bacteriophages isolated from sewage, a typing scheme for B. cereus isolates from outbreaks or sporadic cases of food poisoning was developed. The phages belonged to three morphotypes. Ten phages with contractile tails and icosahedral heads were members of the Myoviridae family, and two phages with noncontractile tails belonged to the Siphoviridae family. Phage 11 represented a new species. It had an isometric head and a very long contractile tail with long wavy tail fibers and was one of the largest viruses known. The vast majority of 166 B. cereus strains (161, or 97%) isolated from food poisoning cases were typeable. Of 146 strains isolated from 18 outbreaks, 142 (97%) could be divided into 17 phage types. A good correlation, on the order of 80 to 100%, between phage types of strains isolated from suspected foods and those of strains isolated from stools of symptomatic patients was observed. Most Bacillus thuringiensis strains were also typeable, providing further evidence of the close relatedness of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This phage typing scheme can be a valuable epidemiological tool in tracing the origins of food poisoning caused by B. cereus.
Notes
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Cites: J Med Microbiol. 1975 Nov;8(4):543-50813000
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Jul 16;2(8029):129-3069207
Cites: J Mol Biol. 1979 Apr 15;129(3):359-73379349
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1952 Sep;50(3):320-5312990793
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1988 Mar;54(3):699-7023132097
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1990 Mar;10(2):125-412119209
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1993 Jun;167(6):1452-58501338
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 1993 Oct;6(4):324-388269390
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1987 Apr;155(4):806-93546523
PubMed ID
7751369 View in PubMed
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131 records – page 1 of 14.