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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Assessment of dietary exposure to trace metals in Baffin Inuit food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6148
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Jul-Aug;103(7-8):740-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
H M Chan
C. Kim
K. Khoday
O. Receveur
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Jul-Aug;103(7-8):740-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cadmium - administration & dosage - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Inuits
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Male
Meat - analysis
Mercury - administration & dosage - analysis
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seals, Earless
Abstract
Chronic metal toxicity is a concern in the Canadian Arctic because of the findings of high metal levels in wildlife animals and the fact that traditional food constitutes a major component of the diet of indigenous peoples. We examined exposure to trace metals through traditional food resources for Inuit living in the community of Qikiqtarjuaq on Baffin Island in the eastern Arctic. Mercury, cadmium, and lead were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Elevated concentrations of mercury ( > 50 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, narwhal mattak, beluga meat, and beluga mattak, and relatively high concentrations of cadmium and lead ( > 100 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, mussels, and kelp. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by adult men and women ( > 20 years old) and children (3-12 years old). Based on traditional food consumption, the average daily intake levels of total mercury for both adults (65 micrograms for women and 97 micrograms for men) and children (38 micrograms) were higher than the Canadian average value (16 micrograms). The average weekly intake of mercury for all age groups exceeded the intake guidelines (5.0 micrograms/kg/day) established by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants. The primary foods that contributed to metal intake for the Baffin Inuit were ringed seal meat, caribou meat, and kelp. We review the superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items and implications for monitoring metal contents of food, clinical symptoms, and food use.
PubMed ID
7588487 View in PubMed
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Bacteriological analysis of fresh produce in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75520
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2002 Aug 25;77(3):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2002
Author
Gro S Johannessen
Semir Loncarevic
Hilde Kruse
Author Affiliation
Section for Food and Feed Microbiology, National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway. gro.johannessen@vetinst.no
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2002 Aug 25;77(3):199-204
Date
Aug-25-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales
Anethum graveolens - microbiology
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Fruit - microbiology - standards
Humans
Lettuce - microbiology
Norway
Petroselinum - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Public Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vegetables - microbiology - standards
Abstract
A total of 890 samples of fresh produce obtained from Norwegian markets were examined in order to assess the bacteriological quality of the products and their potential public health risk. The samples comprised lettuce, pre-cut salads, growing herbs, parsley and dill, mushrooms and strawberries. The samples were analysed for the presence of thermotolerant coliform bacteria (TCB), Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus spp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. Neither Salmonella spp. nor E. coli O157 were isolated. For all product groups included, TCB were isolated from a small proportion of samples. Three samples harboured L. monocytogenes; one of the isolates belonging to serogroup 1 (champignons) and two of the isolates belonging to serogroup 4 (Chinese leaves and strawberries). Staphylococci were isolated from a relatively large proportion of the samples of strawberries and mushrooms. However, only four isolates were identified as S. aureus (non-toxinogenic). By the use of PCR, the presence of Y. enterocolitica was indicated in a few of the samples of lettuce, whilst no positive samples were found using a culturing method. The study shows that the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria and TCB in the products analysed was quite low. Nevertheless, the results indicate that the type of products analysed may contain pathogenic bacteria and thereby represent a risk to the consumers in regard to food-borne diseases.
PubMed ID
12160079 View in PubMed
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Comparison of genotyping methods by application to Salmonella livingstone strains associated with an outbreak of human salmonellosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75468
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2005 Sep 25;104(1):93-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2005
Author
John Eriksson
Charlotta Löfström
Anna Aspán
Anders Gunnarsson
Ingela Karlsson
Elisabeth Borch
Birgitta de Jong
Peter Rådström
Author Affiliation
Applied Microbiology, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2005 Sep 25;104(1):93-103
Date
Sep-25-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - microbiology
Animals
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Genotype
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ribotyping - methods
Salmonella - genetics - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During 2000 and 2001, an outbreak of human salmonellosis occurred in Sweden and Norway, caused by Salmonella livingstone. In this study, the genotypic differences between three strains obtained from food sources during the outbreak, two human strains and 27 more or less unrelated strains were analysed, using the three methods; automated ribotyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Each method was evaluated regarding its discriminatory ability, reproducibility and typeability. Simpson's discriminatory index calculated for each method was 0.556 for automated ribotyping, 0.766 for PFGE and 0.236 for RAPD. The reproducibility, defined as the minimum similarity between individual replicates in a cluster analysis, was 96% for automated ribotyping and PFGE, and 90% for RAPD. All the strains were typeable with each method. When combining results for the three genotyping methods, it was found that RAPD did not increase the discriminatory index and was therefore excluded from further analysis. Using a combination of the results obtained from ribotyping and PFGE (D=0.855), two strains that had been isolated from feed factories during 1998 were shown to be identical to the outbreak strain, indicating a possible route of contamination due to a clone of Salmonella livingstone persisting in feed producing facilities. No connection to poultry was established.
PubMed ID
15978689 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants in bowhead whale tissues and other biota from northern Alaska: implications for human exposure from a subsistence diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4734
Source
Environ Res. 2005 Jul;98(3):329-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
P F Hoekstra
T M O'Hara
S M Backus
C. Hanns
D C G Muir
Author Affiliation
National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ont., Canada L7R4A6.
Source
Environ Res. 2005 Jul;98(3):329-40
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Biodiversity
Biological Availability
Biotransformation
Chlordan - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
DDT - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Diet
Environmental Pollutants - metabolism - toxicity
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Lindane - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Tissue Distribution
Whales - metabolism
Abstract
Bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus; n = 5) blubber, liver, muscle, kidney, heart, diaphragm, tongue, and uncooked maktak (bowhead whale epidermis and blubber) were collected during subsistence hunts at Barrow, AK, USA (1997-1999) to measure concentrations of persistent organochlorine contaminants (OCs). The exposure of humans to OCs via bowhead whales and other biota [fish, ringed (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), and beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas)] as part of a subsistence diet was evaluated. Concentrations of OCs in bowhead whale tissues were correlated with lipid content (P
PubMed ID
15910787 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a Spanish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16675
Source
J Food Prot. 2005 Oct;68(10):2190-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Raquel Ibáñez
Antonio Agudo
Antonio Berenguer
Paula Jakszyn
María José Tormo
María José Sanchéz
José R Quirós
Guillem Pera
Carmen Navarro
Carmen Martinez
Nerea Larrañaga
Miren Dorronsoro
María Dolores Chirlaque
Aurelio Barricarte
Eva Ardanaz
Pilar Amiano
Carlos A Gonzálezi
Author Affiliation
Unit of Epidemiology, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08907 Barcelona, Spain. raquelip@iconcologia.catsalut.net
Source
J Food Prot. 2005 Oct;68(10):2190-5
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Benzo(a)pyrene - administration & dosage - analysis
Carcinogens - administration & dosage - analysis
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Geography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - administration & dosage - analysis
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking
Spain
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to estimate the dietary intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), particularly benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), as well as to identify the principal dietary sources of such compounds in the Spanish adult population. The study included 40,690 subjects aged 35 to 64 years from five regions of Spain that were included in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Spain cohort. Usual food intake was estimated by personal interview through a computerized version of a dietary history questionnaire. The estimations of B[a]P and total PAHs were made, taking into account the country where the determinations of content of these compounds in the foods came from and the year of publication. The mean intake of B[a]P in the population was 0.14 microg/day, and the mean intake of total PAHs was 8.57 microg/day. Both for B[a]P and total PAHs, women had a significantly lower mean intake than men, and older people consumed lesser amounts than younger people. Furthermore, the intake was higher in the northern regions. There were no significant differences by smoking status. The food groups of meat and meat products, cereals, and oils and fats contribute 55.5% to the total B[a]P intake, while cereals and meat and meat products contribute 61% to the total PAH consumption. Our estimations of B[a]P intake were lower than in the United Kingdom and The Netherlands, were similar to those found in other studies from Spain and Italy, and were higher than those in the United States and Norway.
PubMed ID
16245728 View in PubMed
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Effect of acid precipitation on retention and excretion of elements in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67750
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 May 2;145(1-2):81-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2-1994
Author
I. Bensryd
L. Rylander
B. Högstedt
P. Aprea
I. Bratt
C. Fåhraéus
A. Holmén
A. Karlsson
A. Nilsson
B L Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 May 2;145(1-2):81-102
Date
May-2-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid Rain - adverse effects
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Metals - analysis - blood - urine
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
From a population of 8918 farmers, 237 were selected whose consumption of locally produced foods was high. The subjects' water sources, private wells, were of different degrees of acidity. Significant associations between pH (median 6.7, range 4.7-8.6) of the drinking water and element concentrations were found. The correlation was negative for aluminium (Al; median 0.07 mumol/l), cadmium (Cd; 0.44 nmol/l), copper (Cu; 0.24 mumol/l) and lead (Pb; 1.9 nmol/l), and positive for calcium (Ca; 0.62 mmol/l) and magnesium (Mg; 0.21 mmol/l). Associations could not be found between the pH of, or element concentrations in, the water and concentrations of A1 (0.17 mumol/l), Mg (0.86 mmol/l) and selenium (Se; 1.0 mumol/l) in plasma, Cd (2.0 nmol/l), Pb (0.19 mumol/l) and mercury (Hg; 13 nmol/l) in blood, or A1 (12 mumol/mol creatinine) and Cu (11 mumol/mol creatinine) in urine. The concentrations of Hg in blood and Se in plasma were related to fish consumption, Cd and Pb in blood to smoking, A1 in urine to antacid intake, Pb in blood to rifle activities and hunting, and Hg in blood to hunting. Acid precipitation has an effect on element concentrations in drinking water, but not on the retention of those elements in the subjects investigated.
PubMed ID
8016632 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the population distribution of dietary contaminant exposure in an Arctic population using Monte Carlo statistics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4874
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Mar;105(3):316-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
H M Chan
P R Berti
O. Receveur
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Mar;105(3):316-21
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Chlordan - analysis
Demography
Diet
Female
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insecticides - analysis
Inuits
Male
Meat - analysis
Mercury - analysis
Monte Carlo Method
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Toxaphene - analysis
Abstract
Organochlorines and heavy metals have bioaccumulated in Arctic wildlife, which is an important food source for the Inuit. In this study, we have developed a statistical model to describe the population distribution of contaminant exposure and the usual intake of the high-end contaminant consumers. Monte Carlo methods are used to account for variations due to seasonal dietary pattern and contaminant concentrations. Distribution of the dietary intake of the contaminants of most concern-mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlordane, and toxaphenes-are described. Over 50% of the residents had dietary exposure levels exceeding the tolerable daily intake or provisional tolerable daily intake for Hg, toxaphene, and chlordane (83, 91, and 71% for men and 73, 85, and 56% for women, respectively). The high-end consumers (i.e. the 95th centile) have intake levels 6 times higher than the provisional tolerable weekly intake of Hg, and over 20 times the tolerable daily intake of chlordane and toxaphene. Assessment of health risks of the relative high contaminant exposure in this community must also consider the nutritional, economical, cultural, and social importance of these traditional foods. A comprehensive risk management scheme has yet to be developed.
PubMed ID
9171993 View in PubMed
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High human exposure to lead through consumption of birds hunted with lead shot.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75508
Source
Environ Pollut. 2004;127(1):125-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
P. Johansen
G. Asmund
F. Riget
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Arctic Environment, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000, Roskilde, Denmark. poj@dmu.dk
Source
Environ Pollut. 2004;127(1):125-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Birds
Ducks
Food contamination - analysis
Greenland
Humans
Lead
Lead Poisoning - etiology
Meat - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We assess lead contamination of Greenland seabirds killed with lead shot having studied thick-billed murre and common eider, the two most important species in the diet. The lead concentration is very high in meat of eiders killed with lead shot (mean 6.1 microg/g-wet wt, 95% CL 2.1-12). This level is about 44 times higher than in drowned eiders and eight times higher than in shot murres. Analyzing whole breasts instead of sub-samples reveals about seven times higher lead levels in birds' meat. We conclude that in some cases the lead intake by Greenland bird eaters will largely exceed the FAO/WHO tolerable lead intake guideline and that lead shot is a more important source of lead in the diet than previously estimated.
PubMed ID
14554002 View in PubMed
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Influence of the consumption of fatty Baltic Sea fish on plasma levels of halogenated environmental contaminants in Latvian and Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49216
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Nov;108(11):1035-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
A. Sjödin
L. Hagmar
E. Klasson-Wehler
J. Björk
A. Bergman
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Nov;108(11):1035-41
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Diet
Environmental health
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Latvia
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seawater
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
We examined the influence of widely varied consumption of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea and of age on plasma concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorobiphenylols (OH-PCBs), 2, 2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (4,4'-DDT), 2, 2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (4,4'-DDE), 2,2',4, 4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Latvian and Swedish men. Both age and fish consumption were significantly correlated with the concentrations of [sigman]PCB, [sigman]OH-PCB, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDT, and HCB. In the case of BDE-47, no significant relationship with age was observed, and fish consumption had the largest relative effect on plasma concentrations of this contaminant. This relationship may be a result of exposure to BDE-47 having been more recent than that of PCBs and DDE, or because the half-life of BDE-47 may be shorter than that of PCB and DDE. Latvian men demonstrated higher plasma levels of DDE and DDT but lower levels of [sigman]PCB and PCP than did Swedish men. The corresponding levels of HCB and BDE-47 were similar in both countries. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient obtained by comparing the level of the metabolite 4-hydroxy-2,3,3',4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (4-OH-CB107) to the combined levels of its parent compounds, 2,3,3',4, 4'-pentachlorobiphenyl (CB-105) and 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (CB-118), was higher than the median correlation coefficient obtained upon comparing the level of this metabolite to all other possible combinations of two PCB levels. No other increased correlation between metabolite and parent PCB concentration was observed.
PubMed ID
11102293 View in PubMed
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Mercury levels in the hair of pregnant women in a polluted area in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64696
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 Jul 4;151(1):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-4-1994
Author
A. Oskarsson
B J Lagerkvist
B. Ohlin
K. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Swedish National Food Administration, Uppsala.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 Jul 4;151(1):29-35
Date
Jul-4-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Female
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Fresh Water
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis
Metallurgy
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Total mercury concentration in hair, sampled at delivery, was determined in women living in an area polluted with atmospheric emissions of mercury from a metal smelter, (n = 122) and in a control area (n = 75). Information on fish consumption was obtained at the 10th week of pregnancy. The average mercury concentration in hair was 0.27 mg/kg (range 0.07-0.96 mg/kg), which is somewhat lower than previously reported for pregnant women in Sweden and very low compared with levels in fish-eating populations in other parts of the world. Women living in the polluted area had significantly lower mercury levels in hair than women in the control area when comparing groups with quantitatively similar consumption of freshwater fish. Possibly, the population in the smelter area does not catch fish in the neighbourhood and/or the fish in the control area has elevated mercury levels. Consumption of freshwater fish > or = once a week resulted in approximately twice as high hair mercury levels as in those who did not eat freshwater fish at all. Also consumption of saltwater fish > or = once a week resulted in significantly higher hair mercury levels than in those consuming saltwater fish or = once a week) consumption of freshwater fish but decreased during this period in women who did not eat freshwater fish at all, which could be explained by decreased exposure during pregnancy and measurement in recently formed hair.
PubMed ID
8079150 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.