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An examination of traditional foods and cigarette smoking as cadmium sources among the nine First Nations of Eeyou Istchee, Northern Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104372
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2014
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Ian D Martin
Eric N Liberda
Suzanne Coté
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Date
May-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadmium - blood
Child
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic metal present in the environment, accumulates in the organs of herbivorous mammals which typically are consumed by Aboriginal populations. The relative contribution of this potential exposure source to concentrations of blood Cd was investigated in 1429 participants (age >7 years) residing in the nine Cree First Nations communities of Eeyou Istchee, northern Quebec, Canada. Analysis of variance identified significant Cd concentration differences between communities, sex, and age groups, although these were complicated by significant 2-way interactions. The percentage of participants with Cd concentrations within the adopted health-based guideline categories of 'acceptable', 'concern' and 'action' pertaining to kidney damage was 56.2%, 38.3%, and 5.5%, respectively. Partial correlations (controlling for age as a continuous variable) did not show a significant association between consumption of traditional foods and Cd concentrations (r = 0.014, df = 105, p = 0.883). A significant and positive partial correlation (r = 0.390, df = 105, p
PubMed ID
24781002 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of salmonella chester infection in Canada: rare serotype, uncommon exposure, and unusual population demographic facilitate rapid identification of food vehicle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125378
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Apr;75(4):738-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
John Taylor
Eleni Galanis
Lynn Wilcott
Linda Hoang
Jason Stone
Judi Ekkert
Doug Quibell
Mark Huddleston
Rachel McCormick
Yvonne Whitfield
Bijay Adhikari
Christopher C R Grant
Davendra Sharma
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Services, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3.
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Apr;75(4):738-42
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Male
Salmonella - classification - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Serotyping
Abstract
Salmonella Chester infection has rarely been reported in the literature. In 2010, 33 case patients were reported in 2 months in four Canadian provinces. We conducted an outbreak investigation in collaboration with public health agencies, food safety specialists, regulatory agencies, grocery store chains, and the product distributor. We used case patient interviews, customer loyalty cards, and microbiological testing of clinical and food samples to identify nationally distributed head cheese as the food vehicle responsible for the outbreak. The rare serotype, a limited affected demographic group, and an uncommon exposure led to the rapid identification of the source. Control measures were implemented within 9 days of notification of the outbreak.
PubMed ID
22488063 View in PubMed
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Assessment of dietary exposure to trace metals in Baffin Inuit food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6148
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Jul-Aug;103(7-8):740-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
H M Chan
C. Kim
K. Khoday
O. Receveur
H V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Jul-Aug;103(7-8):740-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cadmium - administration & dosage - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Inuits
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Male
Meat - analysis
Mercury - administration & dosage - analysis
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seals, Earless
Abstract
Chronic metal toxicity is a concern in the Canadian Arctic because of the findings of high metal levels in wildlife animals and the fact that traditional food constitutes a major component of the diet of indigenous peoples. We examined exposure to trace metals through traditional food resources for Inuit living in the community of Qikiqtarjuaq on Baffin Island in the eastern Arctic. Mercury, cadmium, and lead were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Elevated concentrations of mercury ( > 50 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, narwhal mattak, beluga meat, and beluga mattak, and relatively high concentrations of cadmium and lead ( > 100 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, mussels, and kelp. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by adult men and women ( > 20 years old) and children (3-12 years old). Based on traditional food consumption, the average daily intake levels of total mercury for both adults (65 micrograms for women and 97 micrograms for men) and children (38 micrograms) were higher than the Canadian average value (16 micrograms). The average weekly intake of mercury for all age groups exceeded the intake guidelines (5.0 micrograms/kg/day) established by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants. The primary foods that contributed to metal intake for the Baffin Inuit were ringed seal meat, caribou meat, and kelp. We review the superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items and implications for monitoring metal contents of food, clinical symptoms, and food use.
PubMed ID
7588487 View in PubMed
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Assessment of PCBs in arctic foods and diets. A pilot study in Broughton Island, Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1333
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Kinloch, D.
Kuhnlein, H.
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare (Canada)
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Broughton Island
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet, traditional
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant feeding
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
PCB
Pilot Projects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 880.
PubMed ID
3152417 View in PubMed
Documents
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The best of two worlds: how the Greenland Board of Nutrition has handled conflicting evidence about diet and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122664
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18588
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Peter Bjerregaard
Gert Mulvad
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. pb@sdu.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18588
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Advisory Committees
Aged
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits - physiology
Greenland
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Seafood
Water Pollution
Young Adult
Abstract
The traditional diet in Greenland consists to a large extent of meat and organs of seal and other marine mammals, which is polluted by POPs and mercury. These substances are present in the blood of Greenlanders in concentrations well above international guidelines, and as these contaminants are suspected of having negative impacts on health, some action should be taken. On the other hand, traditional food is also an important source of health promoting micronutrients that are not provided by imported food in sufficient quantities, for example vitamin D, long chain n-3 fatty acids, and selenium, not to mention the traditional diet's function as a social glue that is perceived as important for Inuit identity in Greenland. The proportion of the total diet that comes from marine mammals is on a constant decrease, and especially children and young adults consume rather little seal and whale. The traditional food items are consequently being replaced by imported food, and among the imported food items several rather unhealthy items are popular, that is carbonated soft drinks with sugar, sweets, chips and farmed (red) meat with a high content of saturated fat. Together with a decrease in physical activity, this dietary transition has resulted in a severe epidemic of overweight and diabetes. In giving advice to the public, the Greenland Board of Nutrition was therefore faced with the challenge to retain the benefits of the traditional diet while minimizing the contaminant exposure, and at the same time to counteract the effects of poor quality imported food. The Board tried to balance the known and suspected positive and negative aspects of the total diet in relation not only to physical health but to general wellbeing, and decided on 10 simple recommendations. As the consumption of traditional food becomes less prominent and as the consumption of food rich in empty calories increases, the guidelines are continuously revised and updated.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 Apr;97(4):691-517329661
Cites: Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1997 Nov-Dec;19(6):417-289392777
PubMed ID
22789516 View in PubMed
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Bioindicator and exposure data for a population based study of manganese.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201700
Source
Neurotoxicology. 1999 Apr-Jun;20(2-3):343-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Baldwin
D. Mergler
F. Larribe
S. Bélanger
R. Tardif
L. Bilodeau
K. Hudnell
Author Affiliation
Centre pour l'étude des interactions biologiques entre la santé et l'environnement (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. baldwin@vax2.concordia.ca
Source
Neurotoxicology. 1999 Apr-Jun;20(2-3):343-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Air Pollutants - analysis
Biological Markers - analysis
Diet
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Iron - blood
Lead - blood
Male
Manganese - blood
Mercury - blood
Metals - blood
Middle Aged
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Water Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Exposure data and bioindicators were obtained for a study whose objective was detection of early manifestations of manganese (Mn) neurotoxicity in a population with potential environmental exposure. The study included persons with no history of neurotoxic workplace exposure in Southwest Quebec, drawn from seven postal code regions, defining a set of geographically contiguous zones. Blood samples were analyzed for total Mn (MnB), lead (PbB), total mercury (HgT) and serum iron (FeS). Drinking water samples from participants' residences were analyzed for manganese (MnW). At 4 sites, limited 24-hour high volume air samples for total particulates (TP) and PM10, were analyzed for Mn and Pb. Sociodemographic and dietary information was obtained by self-administered questionnaire. The geometric mean (GM) for MnB values (n = 297) was 7.14 micrograms/L. Levels of MnB in women (n = 156; GM 7.50 micrograms/L) were significantly higher than in men (n = 141; GM 6.75 micrograms/L). No relationship was found between MnB and PbB or HgT. FeS was significantly higher in men (GM 18.38 mumol/L) than women (GM 15.0 mumol/L). For women, MnB was correlated to FeS, with a tendency to decrease with increasing age. For men, no relationship was found between MnB levels and either FeS or age, although FeS showed a strong inverse relationship with age. The 24-hour mean levels of MnTP at the 4 sites varied between 0.009 microgram/m3 and 0.035 microgram/m3; intersite differences were not significant. For Mn in PM10 (MnPM10), mean values ranged from 0.007 microgram/m3 to 0.019 microgram/m3; intersite differences were significant. A total of 278 MnW samples were obtained, 16 from residences served by wells. The GM for MnW was 4.11 micrograms/L (range: 0.50-71.1 micrograms/L, excluding wells; MnW for wells ranged from non-detectable to 158.9 micrograms/L. Individually, there was no relation between MnW and MnB. Geographic analysis of the MnB and MnW data by an algorithm grouping contiguous postal code zones, combined with air data, lead to definition of a geographic parameter, distinguishing two regions relative to a former manganese alloy plant, which contributed significantly to MnB. A multiple regression model was developed, explaining 6.7% of the variability in MnB (F = 5.12; p
PubMed ID
10385895 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers for Great Lakes priority contaminants: halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213763
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Dec;103 Suppl 9:7-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
M M Feeley
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. mfeeley@hpb.hwc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Dec;103 Suppl 9:7-16
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Adult
Benzofurans - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Biological Markers - analysis
Canada
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Great Lakes Region
Humans
Infant
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Abstract
One of the major goals of the Great Lakes Action Plan is to actively accumulate and assess toxicological information on persistent toxic substances found in the Great Lakes basin. As part of Health Canada's commitment to this plan, a review of biomarkers for the environmental contaminants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) was conducted. In general, while food consumption was identified as the major source of human exposure to both contaminant groups, certain commodities, such as fish, milk and dairy products, and meat, were found to predominate. Due to the ubiquitous nature of these environmental contaminants and their propensity to bioaccumulate, all humans will have detectable body burdens, which in certain cases can be positively associated with the consumption of particular foods (i.e., PCBs and freshwater fish from the Great Lakes). When dealing with environmental exposure only, relating specific effect biomarkers to contaminant exposure or tissue levels was difficult, due in part to the complex nature of the exposure and the nonspecific nature of the effect. For PCBs, the most likely biomarkers of effect included some form of alteration in lipid metabolism (serum triglyceride/cholesterol levels) and elevation of hepatic-related enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Cross-species extrapolation also indicates the potential for neurotoxicologic effects to occur in humans. For PCDDs/PCDFs, dermatologic lesions (chloracne) and indications of hepatic enzyme induction have been documented, but primarily due to occupational or high acute accidental exposures. Recent evidence suggests that neonates may represent a potential at-risk population due to relatively high exposure to PCDDs/PCDFs, as with PCBs, during breast feeding as compared to standard adult dietary intake. Future areas of potential benefit for biomarker development include immunologic and endocrine effects, primarily based on biologic plausibility from experimental animal research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8635442 View in PubMed
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Blood levels of organotin compounds and their relation to fish consumption in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157538
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Jul 25;399(1-3):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-2008
Author
Panu Rantakokko
Anu Turunen
Pia K Verkasalo
Hannu Kiviranta
Satu Männistö
Terttu Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland. Panu.Rantakokko@ktl.fi
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Jul 25;399(1-3):90-5
Date
Jul-25-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Aquaculture
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Environmental monitoring
Female
Finland
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Organotin Compounds - blood
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
The objective of this study was to measure the concentrations of organotin compounds in the whole blood of Finnish male fishermen (n=133), their wives (n=94), and other family members (n=73), and to investigate their associations with background variables. The concentrations were generally low, less than the limit of quantification (LOQ) for the vast majority of compounds and samples. Of the organotin compounds (mono-, di-, and tributyltin, mono-, di-, and triphenyltin, and dioctyltin), only triphenyltin was detected in more than just a few samples (in 37 of 300 samples, LOQ=0.04 ng/ml). These were mainly the samples of fishermen (26/37) and their wives (10/37). For statistical analysis, concentrations of triphenyltin were divided into two categories, LOQ. Of the different background variables, age and fish consumption contributed the most to the triphenyltin concentrations. When age and fish consumption (g/day) were divided into three categories, odds ratios comparing the highest with the lowest category were 3.88 for age (95% CI 1.36-11.09) and 3.48 for fish consumption (1.36-8.94), respectively. Compared with females, males had an odds ratio of 1.51 of having the concentration of triphenyltin >LOQ (0.72-3.14). To the best of our knowledge, this study confirmed for the first time with human samples that fish consumption can be associated with triphenyltin concentration in whole blood.
PubMed ID
18436279 View in PubMed
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Cadmium exposure pathways in a population living near a battery plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79151
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2007 Feb 15;373(2-3):447-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2007
Author
Hellström Lennart
Persson Bodil
Brudin Lars
Grawé Kierstin Petersson
Oborn Ingrid
Järup Lars
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, County Council of Kalmar, Oskarshamn, Sweden. lennarth@ltkalmar.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2007 Feb 15;373(2-3):447-55
Date
Feb-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadmium - analysis - urine
Daucus carota
Diet
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - urine
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Solanum tuberosum
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the present study were to assess the relative impact of different pathways of environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure and to evaluate the contribution from locally produced vegetables and root crops to the total dietary intake of Cd. METHODS: Cadmium in urine was determined for 492 individuals living near a closed down battery factory in Sweden. For each individual we created an environmental exposure-index based on Cd emissions to ambient air and number of years living at various distances from the plant. This information as well as dietary data were collected via questionnaires. Samples of soil, carrots and/or potatoes were collected from 37 gardens and analysed for Cd concentration. RESULTS: Eating home grown vegetables/potatoes, environmental Cd-exposure-index, female gender, age above 30 years and smoking more than one pack of cigarettes daily for at least 10 years were found to be significantly associated with increased urine concentrations of Cd (UCd>1.0 nmol/mmol creatinine). We found a statistically significant relation between Cd in urine and environmental Cd-exposure-index in persons eating home grown vegetables/potatoes regularly. Cd concentrations in home grown carrots, potatoes and in garden soil were highest in the area closest to the factory. Daily consumption of potatoes and vegetables cultivated in the vicinity of the closed battery factory was estimated to increase Cd intake by 18-38%. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that consumption of locally grown vegetables and root crops was an important exposure pathway, in subjects living near a nickel-cadmium battery plant, whereas direct exposure via ambient air was less important.
PubMed ID
17222449 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.