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Alternaria toxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in grain foods in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119610
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter M Scott
Wendy Zhao
Sherry Feng
Benjamin P-Y Lau
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Food Research Division, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 Canada. Peter_Scott@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alternaria - chemistry
Canada
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Liquid
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Lactones - analysis
Limit of Detection
Methanol
Solid Phase Extraction
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Alternaria alternata has been reported to be the most common fungus on Canadian Western wheat. The Alternaria toxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) are mutagenic in vitro and there is also limited evidence for carcinogenic properties. They have been found in wheat from Europe, Argentina, China and Australia, but they have not been looked for in Canadian grains or grain foods. In the present study, 83 samples of grain-based food sold in Canada, including flour, bran, breakfast cereals, infant cereals and bread, were analysed for AOH and AME using extraction with methanol, clean-up on combined aminopropyl/C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and liquid chromatography (LC) with tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) determination. The overall average recoveries of AOH and AME from a variety of spiked cereal foods (n?=?13) were 45?±?9% and 53?±?9%, which could be attributed mainly to MS matrix effects The instrumental limits of detection (LOD) were 0.34 ng/g and 0.13 ng/g for AOH and AME, respectively, and the instrumental limits of quantitation (LOQ) were 1.1 and 0.43 ng/g. Of 83 samples analysed, 70 were positive for AOH (up to 63 ng/g, in a soft wheat bran) and 64 contained AME (up to 12 ng/g in a bran-based breakfast cereal). Of particular interest was the presence of AOH and/or AME in 27 out of 30 infant foods (up to 4.4 ng/g and 9.0 ng/g, respectively, in a sample of multigrain cereal).
Notes
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PubMed ID
23087499 View in PubMed
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Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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Assessment of PCBs in arctic foods and diets. A pilot study in Broughton Island, Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1333
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Kinloch, D.
Kuhnlein, H.
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare (Canada)
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Broughton Island
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet, traditional
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant feeding
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
PCB
Pilot Projects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 880.
PubMed ID
3152417 View in PubMed
Documents
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Atmospheric deposition of trace elements around point sources and human health risk assessment. I: Impact zones near a source of lead emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36598
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):243-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1992
Author
L. Moseholm
E H Larsen
B. Andersen
M M Nielsen
Author Affiliation
COWIconsult, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):243-62
Date
Sep-25-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis
Automobiles
Child
Child, Preschool
Eating
Electric Power Supplies - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lead - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Poaceae - chemistry - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry - metabolism
Abstract
The deposition of lead was monitored over 8 years in the area around a car battery factory north of Copenhagen, Denmark. The area also has heavy traffic. Deposition was measured by in-situ grown vegetables, transplant grass culture biomonitors, bulk deposition and soil samples. Three impact zones were identified by a multivariate statistical analysis. Within each zone, the total dietary intake of lead was estimated for adults and children as a percentage of the provisional tolerably weekly intake (PTWI), and as a result recommendation on restrictions in use of locally grown fruit and vegetables were given to the public. The pattern of lead deposition in the area during the period 1981-1988 was monitored and the amount of lead ingested via vegetables was toxically evaluated. Lead emission reduction measures introduced in the factory and in the traffic during the period produced significant reductions in lead deposition.
PubMed ID
1439754 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers for Great Lakes priority contaminants: halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213763
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Dec;103 Suppl 9:7-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
M M Feeley
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. mfeeley@hpb.hwc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Dec;103 Suppl 9:7-16
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Adult
Benzofurans - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Biological Markers - analysis
Canada
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Great Lakes Region
Humans
Infant
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis - blood
Abstract
One of the major goals of the Great Lakes Action Plan is to actively accumulate and assess toxicological information on persistent toxic substances found in the Great Lakes basin. As part of Health Canada's commitment to this plan, a review of biomarkers for the environmental contaminants polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) was conducted. In general, while food consumption was identified as the major source of human exposure to both contaminant groups, certain commodities, such as fish, milk and dairy products, and meat, were found to predominate. Due to the ubiquitous nature of these environmental contaminants and their propensity to bioaccumulate, all humans will have detectable body burdens, which in certain cases can be positively associated with the consumption of particular foods (i.e., PCBs and freshwater fish from the Great Lakes). When dealing with environmental exposure only, relating specific effect biomarkers to contaminant exposure or tissue levels was difficult, due in part to the complex nature of the exposure and the nonspecific nature of the effect. For PCBs, the most likely biomarkers of effect included some form of alteration in lipid metabolism (serum triglyceride/cholesterol levels) and elevation of hepatic-related enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Cross-species extrapolation also indicates the potential for neurotoxicologic effects to occur in humans. For PCDDs/PCDFs, dermatologic lesions (chloracne) and indications of hepatic enzyme induction have been documented, but primarily due to occupational or high acute accidental exposures. Recent evidence suggests that neonates may represent a potential at-risk population due to relatively high exposure to PCDDs/PCDFs, as with PCBs, during breast feeding as compared to standard adult dietary intake. Future areas of potential benefit for biomarker development include immunologic and endocrine effects, primarily based on biologic plausibility from experimental animal research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8635442 View in PubMed
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Canadian Total Diet Study in 1998: pesticide levels in foods from Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, and corresponding dietary intake estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30285
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
D F Rawn
X L Cao
J. Doucet
D J Davies
W F Sun
R W Dabeka
W H Newsome
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division (2203D), Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0L2. thea_rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Surveys
Female
Fishes
Food Analysis - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant
Insecticides - analysis
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Middle Aged
Organophosphorus Compounds
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry
Yukon Territory
Abstract
The Canadian Total Diet Study is a national survey to determine the level of chemical contaminants in the Canadian food supply. Food samples were collected from Whitehorse, Yukon, supermarkets as part of the study in 1998. Whitehorse was chosen as a sampling centre, despite its small population (n = 19,000), to determine if residue levels were different in foods available in northern communities relative to levels observed in previous studies in the more populated south. Foods were prepared as for consumption before pesticide residue analysis. Residue levels observed in most foods were similar to levels observed in samples from previous surveys from southern Canadian cities. Malathion and DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene), a transformation product of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl(ethane), were the two most frequently detected compounds (26.4 and 25.8%, respectively). The majority of pesticides, however, had a detection frequency of
PubMed ID
15195471 View in PubMed
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Challenges in listeriosis cluster and outbreak investigations, Province of Quebec, 1997-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106640
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Colette Gaulin
Geneviève Gravel
Sadjia Bekal
Andrea Currie
Danielle Ramsay
Sophie Roy
Author Affiliation
1 Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux , Québec, Québec, Canada .
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 Jan;11(1):1-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Public Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Public health authorities place a high priority on investigating listeriosis outbreaks, and these epidemiological investigations remain challenging. Some approaches have been described in the literature to address these challenges. This review of listeriosis clusters and outbreaks investigated in the Province of Quebec (Quebec) highlights investigative approaches that contributed to identifying the source of these outbreaks.
The Laboratoire de Santé Publique du Québec (LSPQ) implemented pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) molecular subtyping in 1997 to identify Listeria monocytogenes clusters among isolates from invasive listeriosis cases identified throughout Quebec. A cluster was defined as three cases or more with the same or similar PFGE profiles (=3 band difference) occurring over a 4-month period. An investigation was initiated if the epidemiologic indicators suggested a common source. Listeriosis data from LSPQ's database were reviewed to identify and describe clusters detected from 1997 to 2011, including those that led to an outbreak investigation. Epidemiological reports prepared following each outbreak were also reviewed.
Eleven clusters were identified in the province by LSPQ between 1997 and 2011. Outbreak investigations were initiated for six clusters, four of which involved more than 10 cases. Factors that contributed to identifying the source for three of these outbreaks highlighted the value of (1) making all stakeholders (food safety and inspection services, public health authorities, and laboratories) aware of any ongoing investigation and sharing relevant information even if the source is not yet identified; (2) promptly collecting food samples identified and considered as possible vehicles of infection identified during the interview of a Listeria case; (3) collecting food items and/or environmental samples in locations reported in common by cases in the same cluster.
Multiple approaches should be considered when investigating L. monocytogenes clusters. Networks to facilitate continuous exchange of human and food data between public health and food safety partners should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
24134667 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of quantitative values of regional factors of exposure in the studied areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115864
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu A Rakhmanin
T A Shashina
T N Ungurianu
S M Novikov
N S Skvortsova
A V Matsiuk
T B Legostaeva
N A Antipanova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):30-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Health - standards
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Questionnaires
Research Design
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
In the paper the results of a comparative evaluation of the Russian and the standard, recommended by US EPA, factors of population exposure in seven areas of different federal districts of Russia are presented. Concerning the adult population differences reach 3.5 times, for children (1-6 years) - 4.2 times. An example of the effect of regional differences and standard factors on levels of exposure and risk is considered. Promising areas for further research on regional factors to improve the accuracy and reliability of the forecast assessments of the risks to public health have been identified.
PubMed ID
23457989 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jun 2;158(11):1467-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-1998
Author
J. Hoey
B. Postl
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jun 2;158(11):1467-8
Date
Jun-2-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Mercury Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Methylmercury Compounds - poisoning
Pregnancy
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Feb 3;108(3):388-91 passim4691098
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Dec 15;157(12):1655-69418648
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1983 Oct;118(4):461-96637973
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Jun 2;158(11):1439-459629105
PubMed ID
9629110 View in PubMed
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Dietary benzo(a)pyrene intake during pregnancy and birth weight: associations modified by vitamin C intakes in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107027
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Talita Duarte-Salles
Michelle A Mendez
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: duartesallest@fellows.iarc.fr.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Benzo(a)pyrene - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Birth Weight - drug effects
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Food - classification
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System - chemically induced
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Microphthalmos - chemically induced
Multivariate Analysis
Mutagenicity Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. However, the role of diet, the main source of PAH exposure among non-smokers, remains uncertain.
To assess associations between maternal exposure to dietary intake of the genotoxic PAH benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] during pregnancy and birth weight, exploring potential effect modification by dietary intakes of vitamins C, E and A, hypothesized to influence PAH metabolism.
This study included 50,651 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary B(a)P and nutrient intakes were estimated based on total consumption obtained from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and estimated based on food composition data. Data on infant birth weight were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between dietary B(a)P and birth weight, evaluating potential interactions with candidate nutrients.
The multivariate-adjusted coefficient (95%CI) for birth weight associated with maternal energy-adjusted B(a)P intake was -20.5g (-31.1, -10.0) in women in the third compared with the first tertile of B(a)P intake. Results were similar after excluding smokers. Significant interactions were found between elevated intakes of vitamin C (>85mg/day) and dietary B(a)P during pregnancy for birth weight (P
PubMed ID
24071023 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.