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Assessment of microbiological quality of retail fresh sushi from selected sources in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269395
Source
J Food Prot. 2015 May;78(5):977-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Sunniva Hoel
Lisbeth Mehli
Torkjel Bruheim
Olav Vadstein
Anita Nordeng Jakobsen
Source
J Food Prot. 2015 May;78(5):977-82
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Fish Products - microbiology
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food contamination - analysis
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Norway
Abstract
Retail fresh sushi is gaining popularity in Europe. This study was conducted to investigate the microbiological quality of selected samples of fresh sushi with a shelf life of 2 to 3 days offered as complete meals in Norwegian supermarkets. Analysis of aerobic plate counts in 58 sushi samples from three producers revealed large variations in microbiological quality, and 48% of the analyzed sushi boxes were rated as unsatisfactory (> 6.0 log CFU/g). Mesophilic Aeromonas spp. was detected in 71% of the samples. In a follow-up study, we collected products and raw materials directly from the production facility of one producer and observed a significant decrease (P
PubMed ID
25951393 View in PubMed
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Blood levels of organotin compounds and their relation to fish consumption in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157538
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Jul 25;399(1-3):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-2008
Author
Panu Rantakokko
Anu Turunen
Pia K Verkasalo
Hannu Kiviranta
Satu Männistö
Terttu Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland. Panu.Rantakokko@ktl.fi
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Jul 25;399(1-3):90-5
Date
Jul-25-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Aquaculture
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Environmental monitoring
Female
Finland
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Organotin Compounds - blood
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
The objective of this study was to measure the concentrations of organotin compounds in the whole blood of Finnish male fishermen (n=133), their wives (n=94), and other family members (n=73), and to investigate their associations with background variables. The concentrations were generally low, less than the limit of quantification (LOQ) for the vast majority of compounds and samples. Of the organotin compounds (mono-, di-, and tributyltin, mono-, di-, and triphenyltin, and dioctyltin), only triphenyltin was detected in more than just a few samples (in 37 of 300 samples, LOQ=0.04 ng/ml). These were mainly the samples of fishermen (26/37) and their wives (10/37). For statistical analysis, concentrations of triphenyltin were divided into two categories, LOQ. Of the different background variables, age and fish consumption contributed the most to the triphenyltin concentrations. When age and fish consumption (g/day) were divided into three categories, odds ratios comparing the highest with the lowest category were 3.88 for age (95% CI 1.36-11.09) and 3.48 for fish consumption (1.36-8.94), respectively. Compared with females, males had an odds ratio of 1.51 of having the concentration of triphenyltin >LOQ (0.72-3.14). To the best of our knowledge, this study confirmed for the first time with human samples that fish consumption can be associated with triphenyltin concentration in whole blood.
PubMed ID
18436279 View in PubMed
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Canadian Total Diet Study in 1998: pesticide levels in foods from Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, and corresponding dietary intake estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30285
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
D F Rawn
X L Cao
J. Doucet
D J Davies
W F Sun
R W Dabeka
W H Newsome
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division (2203D), Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0L2. thea_rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Surveys
Female
Fishes
Food Analysis - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant
Insecticides - analysis
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Middle Aged
Organophosphorus Compounds
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry
Yukon Territory
Abstract
The Canadian Total Diet Study is a national survey to determine the level of chemical contaminants in the Canadian food supply. Food samples were collected from Whitehorse, Yukon, supermarkets as part of the study in 1998. Whitehorse was chosen as a sampling centre, despite its small population (n = 19,000), to determine if residue levels were different in foods available in northern communities relative to levels observed in previous studies in the more populated south. Foods were prepared as for consumption before pesticide residue analysis. Residue levels observed in most foods were similar to levels observed in samples from previous surveys from southern Canadian cities. Malathion and DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene), a transformation product of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl(ethane), were the two most frequently detected compounds (26.4 and 25.8%, respectively). The majority of pesticides, however, had a detection frequency of
PubMed ID
15195471 View in PubMed
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Childhood urine mercury excretion: dental amalgam and fish consumption as exposure factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181155
Source
Environ Res. 2004 Mar;94(3):283-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Michael Levy
Stephane Schwartz
Margareta Dijak
Jean-Philippe Weber
Robert Tardif
Fabrice Rouah
Author Affiliation
Montreal Public Health Department, 1301 Sherbrooke Street East, Montreal, Canada H2L 1M3. mlevy@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Environ Res. 2004 Mar;94(3):283-90
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Body Weights and Measures
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Amalgam - chemistry
Female
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Male
Mercury - urine
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The authors investigated the effect of amalgam fillings and fish consumption on urine mercury level (UHg), in children aged 4-8 years old inclusive. Using a sample of 60 children, we found that children with amalgam fillings had significantly higher UHg levels than children without amalgams (geometric mean=1.412microg Hg/g versus 0.436 microg Hg/g, respectively, P = 0.0001). Subjects with reported higher fish consumption also had significantly higher UHgs (P = 0.004). Univariate analyses provide evidence of an association between elevated UHg level and young age (P = 0.009), short height (P = 0.024), and low weight (P = 0.049) in children with amalgam chewing surfaces. We also found a negative correlation between urine mercury and age (-0.378), height (-0.418), and weight (-0.391). A multiple logistic regression model shows that the presence of amalgam fillings leads to increased odds of high UHg in children (OR=47.18), even after adjusting for high fish consumption (OR=8.66) and height (OR=11.36).
PubMed ID
15016596 View in PubMed
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Consumption of fish from a contaminated lake strongly affects the concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane in serum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93768
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 Feb;52(2):228-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Thomsen Cathrine
Knutsen Helle K
Liane Veronica H
Frøshaug May
Kvalem Helen E
Haugen Margaretha
Meltzer Helle M
Alexander Jan
Becher Georg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. cathrine.thomsen@fhi.no
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 Feb;52(2):228-37
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Diet
Female
Fishes
Flame Retardants - administration & dosage - analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Fresh Water
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - analysis - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polybrominated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Questionnaires
Species Specificity
Water Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Very high concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) have been reported in fish from Lake Mjøsa in Norway. This study was performed to examine the serum concentrations of PBDE and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in consumers of fish from this lake and to investigate possible relationships between serum concentrations, self-reported fish intake and calculated total dietary PBDE exposure. Serum concentrations of the sum of the seven PBDE (BDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154 and 183) were significantly higher than those of a reference group of Norwegians eating only food with background levels of contamination (medians: 18 ng/g lipids men, 8.4 ng/g lipids women). The median dietary intake of Sum 7 PBDE was 2549 ng/day (30 ng/kg body weight/day), the highest dietary intake of PBDE reported. The contribution from fish caught from the contaminated lake comprised 98.7% of the total dietary exposure. For men, serum levels of PBDE were strongly correlated with the calculated dietary exposure, except for BDE-209. This suggests that sources other than the diet are important for human BDE-209 exposure. The median serum HBCD concentration was 4.1 and 2.6 ng/g lipids for men and women, respectively, and was also found to be associated with consumption of fish from Lake Mjøsa.
PubMed ID
18186101 View in PubMed
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Contaminant exposure among women of childbearing age who eat St. Lawrence River sport fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186237
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;57(5):473-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sylvie Nadon
Tom Kosatsky
Raymond Przybysz
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Montreal-Centre, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;57(5):473-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Diet Surveys
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food contamination - analysis
Fresh Water - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mercury Poisoning - blood - etiology
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - poisoning
Quebec
Questionnaires
Seafood - analysis
Sports
Spouses
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Women's health
Abstract
Little information is available concerning the level of consumption and degree of contaminant exposure for North American women of childbearing age who eat sport fish. The authors reanalyzed a 1995-1996 study of Montreal-area (Canada) sport fishers. The authors focused on women sport fishers of childbearing age and male sport fishers who had spouses of childbearing age. The primary research involved an on-site questionnaire about fish consumption, with follow-up assessment of sport fishers estimated to have either the highest or lowest levels of fish-based contaminant exposure. Among the 1,654 interviewees were 100 women less than 45 yr of age who had eaten sport fish for an average of 11 yr; 45% ate fish less than once a month. From the follow-up subsample of high- and low-level consumers, the authors identified 17 women less than 45 yr of age and 25 males whose spouses who were less than 45 yr of age and who consumed similar quantities of sport fish. Among this group of 42, the high-exposure women differed from the low-exposure women with respect to their yearly consumption of freshwater fish, blood mercury levels (median = 6.4 vs. 1.4 microgram/l), and plasma polychlorinated biphenyl congener 99 (median = 10.5 vs. 5.9 microgram/kg plasma lipids). Few Montreal-area women of childbearing age consume local sport fish frequently or for extended periods. However, among the small proportion that consumes sport fish frequently or for extended periods, blood mercury concentrations approach levels of concern for fetal protection.
PubMed ID
12641192 View in PubMed
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Contents of lead and cadmium in selected fish species consumed in Finland in 1993-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211358
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1996 Aug-Sep;13(6):647-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Tahvonen
J. Kumpulainen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Food Chemistry, Agricultural Research Centre of Finland, Jokioinen, Finland.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1996 Aug-Sep;13(6):647-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cadmium - analysis
Finland
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Lead - analysis
Quality Control
Abstract
The lead and cadmium contents of the main fish species consumed in Finland were determined by ETAAS after wet digestion with HNO3. Analytical quality was controlled with blanks, reference materials and blind replicates. Mean and median lead contents of domestic fish species were
PubMed ID
8871122 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jun 2;158(11):1467-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-1998
Author
J. Hoey
B. Postl
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jun 2;158(11):1467-8
Date
Jun-2-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Mercury Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Methylmercury Compounds - poisoning
Pregnancy
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Feb 3;108(3):388-91 passim4691098
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Dec 15;157(12):1655-69418648
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1983 Oct;118(4):461-96637973
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Jun 2;158(11):1439-459629105
PubMed ID
9629110 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure of Canadians to perfluorinated carboxylates and perfluorooctane sulfonate via consumption of meat, fish, fast foods, and food items prepared in their packaging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164483
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Apr 18;55(8):3203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2007
Author
Sheryl A Tittlemier
Karen Pepper
Carol Seymour
John Moisey
Roni Bronson
Xu-Liang Cao
Robert W Dabeka
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Banting Research Centre 2203D, and Chemical Health Hazard Assessment Division, Banting Research Centre 2204D, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0L2, Canada. Sheryl_Tittlemier@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Apr 18;55(8):3203-10
Date
Apr-18-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis
Animals
Canada
Carboxylic Acids - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Fishes
Fluorocarbons - analysis
Food analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Food Packaging
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Fluorinated - analysis
Meat - analysis
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
Human exposure to perfluorinated compounds is a worldwide phenomenon; however, routes of human exposure to these compounds have not been well-characterized. Fifty-four solid food composite samples collected as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study (TDS) were analyzed for perfluorocarboxylates and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) using a methanol extraction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. Foods analyzed included fish and seafood, meat, poultry, frozen entrées, fast food, and microwave popcorn collected from 1992 to 2004 and prepared as for consumption. Nine composites contained detectable levels of perfluorinated compounds-four meat-containing, three fish and shellfish, one fast food, and one microwave popcorn. PFOS and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) were detected the most frequently; concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 4.5 ng/g. The average dietary intake of total perfluorocarboxylates and PFOS for Canadians was estimated to be 250 ng/day, using results from the 2004 TDS composites. A comparison with intakes of perfluorocarboxylates and PFOS via other routes (air, water, dust, treated carpeting, and apparel) suggested that diet is an important source of these compounds. There was a substantial margin of exposure between the toxicological points of reference and the magnitude of dietary intake of perfluorinated compounds for Canadians >/= 12 years old.
PubMed ID
17381114 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to a group of naturally produced organohalogens (halogenated dimethyl bipyrroles) via consumption of fish and seafood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180872
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2004 Apr 7;52(7):2010-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-2004
Author
Sheryl A Tittlemier
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Banting Research Centre 2203D, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2. sheryl_tittlemier@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2004 Apr 7;52(7):2010-5
Date
Apr-7-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Fish Products - analysis
Fishes
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - analysis
Pyrroles - analysis
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
Concentrations of four naturally produced halogenated dimethyl bipyrroles (HDBPs) were quantitated in marine fish (n = 10), freshwater fish (n = 10), canned fish (n = 10), and shrimp composites (n = 10) collected from 1992 to 2002 for the Canadian Total Diet Study. Canned fish composites composed of epipelagic higher trophic level species contained the highest concentration of HDBPs (SigmaHDBP geometric mean +/- standard error = 880 +/- 690 pg/g of wet weight, n = 10), which was significantly higher than that found in the other three composites. There were no significant temporal trends of HDBP concentrations observed for any of the four composites. The estimated daily intake of HDBPs via consumption of fish and seafood was determined to be 53 pg/kg of body mass/day and 0.10 pg of TEQ/kg of body mass/day when transformed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin equivalents (TEQs). In the canned fish and shrimp composites collected in 1998, HDBPs accounted for approximately 98 and 19%, respectively, of the total quantitated TEQ (which included polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and furans). The results of this study provide the first estimate of human exposure to naturally produced bioaccumulating organohalogens.
PubMed ID
15053544 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.