Skip header and navigation

Refine By

395 records – page 1 of 40.

(90)Sr in King Bolete Boletus edulis and certain other mushrooms consumed in Europe and China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275929
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Michal Saniewski
Tamara Zalewska
Grazyna Krasinska
Natalia Szylke
Yuanzhong Wang
Jerzy Falandysz
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Basidiomycota - chemistry
China
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The (90)Sr activity concentrations released from a radioactive fallout have been determined in a range of samples of mushrooms collected in Poland, Belarus, China, and Sweden in 1996-2013. Measurement of (90)Sr in pooled samples of mushrooms was carried out with radiochemical procedure aimed to pre-isolate the analyte from the fungal materials before it was determined using the Low-Level Beta Counter. Interestingly, the Purple Bolete Imperator rhodopurpureus collected from Yunnan in south-western China in 2012 showed (90)Sr activity concentration at around 10 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass, which was greater when compared to other mushrooms in this study. The King Bolete Boletus edulis from China showed the (90)Sr activity in caps at around 1.5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass (whole fruiting bodies) in 2012 and for specimens from Poland activity was well lower than 1.0 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass in 1998-2010. A sample of Sarcodonimbricatus collected in 1998 from the north-eastern region of Poland impacted by Chernobyl fallout showed (90)Sr in caps at around 5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. Concentration of (90)Sr in Bay Bolete Royoporus (Xerocomus or Boletus) badius from affected region of Gomel in Belarus was in 2010 at 2.1 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. In several other species from Poland (90)Sr was at
PubMed ID
26590866 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aeromonas spp. isolated from ready-to-eat seafood on the Norwegian market: prevalence, putative virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312214
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2021 Apr; 130(4):1380-1393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2021
Author
H-J Lee
S Hoel
B-T Lunestad
J Lerfall
A N Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2021 Apr; 130(4):1380-1393
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aeromonas - classification - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Food contamination - analysis
Norway
Prevalence
Seafood - microbiology
Virulence Factors - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
We aim to investigate the prevalence, putative virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance of mesophilic Aeromonas isolated from ready-to-eat (RTE) seafood available on the Norwegian market, and to assess the potential risks by consuming RTE seafood to consumers.
The prevalence of mesophilic Aeromonas in 148 RTE seafood was investigated and the highest prevalence was found in retail sushi (17%), followed by oysters (10%), fresh salmon loins (10%) and scallops (4%). Among 43 Aeromonas isolates, 75% of them were identified as A. media, 23% as A. salmonicida and 2% as A. bestiarum based on partial gryB gene sequencing. Aeromonas isolates were potentially pathogenic due to the presence of four virulence genes: alt (73%), hylA (22%), aerA (17%) and act (6%). In addition, all isolates were resistant to ampicillin and erythromycin. Most of the isolates (98%) were multidrug resistant.
The occurrence of potentially pathogenic and multidrug-resistant Aeromonas strains in RTE seafood implies a potential risk to consumers. Our finding suggests that RTE seafood could be a potential vehicle for the transfer of virulent and multidrug-resistant Aeromonas.
To our knowledge, this is the first study to report multiple antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas associated with RTE seafood in Norway.
PubMed ID
33025711 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternaria toxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in grain foods in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119610
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter M Scott
Wendy Zhao
Sherry Feng
Benjamin P-Y Lau
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Food Research Division, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 Canada. Peter_Scott@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alternaria - chemistry
Canada
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Liquid
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Lactones - analysis
Limit of Detection
Methanol
Solid Phase Extraction
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Alternaria alternata has been reported to be the most common fungus on Canadian Western wheat. The Alternaria toxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) are mutagenic in vitro and there is also limited evidence for carcinogenic properties. They have been found in wheat from Europe, Argentina, China and Australia, but they have not been looked for in Canadian grains or grain foods. In the present study, 83 samples of grain-based food sold in Canada, including flour, bran, breakfast cereals, infant cereals and bread, were analysed for AOH and AME using extraction with methanol, clean-up on combined aminopropyl/C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and liquid chromatography (LC) with tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) determination. The overall average recoveries of AOH and AME from a variety of spiked cereal foods (n?=?13) were 45?±?9% and 53?±?9%, which could be attributed mainly to MS matrix effects The instrumental limits of detection (LOD) were 0.34 ng/g and 0.13 ng/g for AOH and AME, respectively, and the instrumental limits of quantitation (LOQ) were 1.1 and 0.43 ng/g. Of 83 samples analysed, 70 were positive for AOH (up to 63 ng/g, in a soft wheat bran) and 64 contained AME (up to 12 ng/g in a bran-based breakfast cereal). Of particular interest was the presence of AOH and/or AME in 27 out of 30 infant foods (up to 4.4 ng/g and 9.0 ng/g, respectively, in a sample of multigrain cereal).
Notes
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Sep 8;58(17):9622-3020687560
Cites: Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;47(1):79-8321442923
Cites: Fungal Biol. 2012 Feb;116(2):249-6022289771
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2000 Jul;48(7):2920-410898645
Cites: Toxicol Pathol. 2001 Jul-Aug;29(4):492-711560255
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2009 Apr;53(4):441-5118727009
Cites: Chin Med J (Engl). 1992 May;105(5):394-4001499370
Cites: Biochem J. 1953 Oct;55(3):421-3313105649
Cites: Toxicol Lett. 2006 Jul 14;164(3):221-3016464542
Cites: J Food Prot. 2008 Jun;71(6):1262-518592757
Cites: J AOAC Int. 2001 Nov-Dec;84(6):1809-1711767150
PubMed ID
23087499 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Society for Circumpolar Health. Comparison of mercury in selected subsistence foods from western Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4462
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Dec;62(4):448
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003

Analysis of cured meat products for cryptosporidium oocysts following possible contamination during an extensive waterborne outbreak of Cryptosporidiosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124610
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 May;75(5):982-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Lucy J Robertson
Qirong Huang
Author Affiliation
Parasitology Laboratory, Section for Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O. Box 8146 Dep, 0033 Oslo, Norway. Lucy.Robertson@nvh.no
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 May;75(5):982-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Consumer Product Safety
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology
Cryptosporidium - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Food contamination - analysis
Food Parasitology
Humans
Meat Products - parasitology
Oocysts
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of waterborne cryptosporidiosis in a town in northern Sweden during winter 2010 resulted in the potential exposure of cured meat products to Cryptosporidium oocysts during their manufacture. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for analyzing cured meat products for contamination with Cryptosporidium oocysts and use this method to analyze potentially contaminated product samples. A simple method of elution, concentration, separation, and detection was used, based on work with other food matrices but adapted for the relatively high fat content of cured meat surfaces. Using spiking experiments, the recovery efficiency of this method was found to be over 60%. In the analysis of the potentially contaminated products, only one putative Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected, and this was sufficiently deformed so that it could not be confirmed as an oocyst; if it was an oocyst, it was considered to have been probably deformed and inactivated prior to analysis. Based on the results of the analyses, together with data on the probable extent of contamination of the products and on our knowledge of factors, such as water activity, which affect oocyst survival, the products were safely released to the market.
PubMed ID
22564952 View in PubMed
Less detail

395 records – page 1 of 40.