Skip header and navigation

Refine By

189 records – page 1 of 19.

The 6th Klaas Breur memorial lecture, 1987. The Chernobyl accident--impact Western Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25858
Source
Radiother Oncol. 1988 May;12(1):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988

[90 Strontium in milk-teeth, diet and bones. A comparative study of levels in Denmark, Faeroe Islands and Greenland]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44580
Source
Nord Med. 1968 Feb 29;79(9):280-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-29-1968

137 Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256245
Source
Health Phys. 1971 Jun;20(6):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971

137Cs urinary excretion by northwestern Italians ten years after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72690
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):498-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
R. Ropolo
P. Cesana
Author Affiliation
Servizio di Fisica Sanitaria, A.O. San Giovanni Battista, Molinette Hospital, Torino, Italy.
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):498-501
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Body Burden
Cesium Radioisotopes - urine
Female
Food contamination, radioactive
Health Physics
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Dosage
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Measurements of 137Cs contamination in the urine of 37 individuals were performed in 1995 and 1996 in order to evaluate the 137Cs daily urinary excretion in the northwestern italian people ten years from the Chernobyl accident. The difference between the average 137Cs daily urinary excretion assessed for 1995 and for 1996 was not statistically significant. Using the values of urine contamination, an estimate of 0.2 Bq(-1) of mean ingested activity was obtained. A mean committed effective dose of about 1 microSv was determined as due to the 137Cs ingestion during 1 y at 10 y after the accident. Such a dose is lower by a factor of 10(3) than the corresponding value for the population of North Italy in the first year following the Chernobyl accident.
PubMed ID
9287092 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2011 May;102(5):438-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tuukka Turtiainen
Eila Kostiainen
Anja Hallikainen
Author Affiliation
STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, 00881 Helsinki, Finland. tuukka.turtiainen@stuk.fi
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2011 May;102(5):438-42
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cereals - chemistry - classification - metabolism
Data Collection
Female
Finland
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Polonium - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Radiation monitoring
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
A survey was carried out on the activity concentrations of (210)Pb and (210)Po in cereal grains produced in Finland. The cereal species were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oats (Avena sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), which account for 90% of the Finnish consumption of cereal products. The survey consisted of 18 flour and 13 unprocessed cereal samples and one hulled grain sample from 22 flour mills. According to the results, the mean (210)Pb/(210)Po concentrations in wheat grains, wheat flour, rye flour, oat grains and barley grains were 0.29, 0.12, 0.29, 0.36 and 0.36 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Combined with the consumption rates of the products, we assess that the mean effective doses from (210)Pb and (210)Po in cereal products for the adult male and female population are 22 and 17 µSv per year, respectively.
PubMed ID
21035236 View in PubMed
Less detail

210Po, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms and ingestion doses to man from high consumption rates of these wild foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119426
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Anna Nalbandyan
Geir Rudolfsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, The Fram Centre, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway. justin.gwynn@nrpa.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Angiosperms
Basidiomycota
Eating
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper discusses activity concentrations of (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms collected from Øvre Dividalen national park, Northern Norway and derives committed effective ingestion doses to man based on high consumption rates of these wild foods. Edible wild berries and mushrooms accumulated similar levels of (210)Pb, but mushrooms accumulated higher levels of (210)Po and (40)K than berries. There appears to be a clear difference in the ability of Leccinum spp. of fungi to accumulate (210)Po and/or translocate (210)Po to mushrooms compared to Russula spp. of fungi. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms from Øvre Dividalen national park reflected the lower levels of fallout of this radionuclide in Northern Norway compared to more central areas following the Chernobyl accident. For mushrooms, ingestion doses are dominated by (210)Po, while for berries, (40)K is typically the main contributor to dose. Based on high consumption rates, ingestion doses arising from the combination of (210)Po, (210)Pb and (40)K were up to 0.05 mSv/a for berries and 0.50 mSv/a for mushrooms. Consumption of such wild foods may result in a significant contribution to total annual doses when consumed in large quantities, particularly when selecting mushrooms species that accumulate high activity concentrations of (210)Po.
PubMed ID
23103573 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of the contribution of forest pathways to the radiation exposure of different population groups in the Bryansk region of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195787
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2000 Dec;39(4):291-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
S V Fesenko
G. Voigt
S I Spiridonov
N I Sanzharova
I A Gontarenko
M. Belli
U. Sansone
Author Affiliation
Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology, Obninsk.
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2000 Dec;39(4):291-300
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - radiation effects
Agriculture
Animals
Cattle
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Ecosystem
Food Contamination, Radioactive - prevention & control
Fruit - radiation effects
Geography
Humans
Milk
Models, Statistical
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radiometry
Rural Population
Russia
Time Factors
Trees - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The experience gained in the aftermath of serious radiation accidents shows that forests are an important source of external and internal exposure of the affected population. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the major radiological consequences for forests of Russia, most heavily contaminated after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) accident. Illustrated in the Novozybkovsky district of the Russian Federation, the significance of different forest exposure pathways is estimated and the doses resulting from forest pathways are compared with the doses from agricultural products. It has been found that the contribution of mushrooms and berries to the internal doses of the population, relative to the doses from agricultural products, varied from 10-15% in 1987 to 40-45% in 1996. The results indicate large differences in internal exposure of members of the "critical groups" and "normal population", increasing with time after deposition. Data are presented that give information on the contribution of forests to the collective doses of inhabitants of the area under consideration. It has been shown that for 10 years after the accident (1987-1996), the contribution of forest products to the collective dose of the rural population living in contaminated forests of the Novozybkovsky district, amounts to about 20% (213 person Sv) of the total collective dose of internal and external exposures. However, a potential impact of these products including the dose from exported products is much higher and might reach 659 person Sv. It has been found that in the long-term after the ChNPP accident, serious attention should be given to forest countermeasures, and restoration strategies should be selected on the basis of a combined analysis of the effectiveness of forest and agricultural countermeasures.
PubMed ID
11200973 View in PubMed
Less detail

189 records – page 1 of 19.