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Adverse health effects of experiencing food insecurity among Greenlandic school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107728
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Max Petzold
Christina W Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Greenlandic Branch, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Male
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
In vulnerable populations, food security in children has been found to be associated with negative health effects. Still, little is known about whether the negative health effects can be retrieved in children at the population level.
To examine food insecurity reported by Greenlandic school children as a predictor for perceived health, physical symptoms and medicine use.
The study is based on the Greenlandic part of the Health Behavior in School-aged Children survey. The 2010 survey included 2,254 students corresponding to 40% of all Greenlandic school children in Grade 5 through 10. The participation rate in the participating schools was 65%. Food insecurity was measured as going to bed or to school hungry because there was no food at home.
Boys, the youngest children (11-12 year-olds), and children from low affluence homes were at increased risk for food insecurity. Poor or fair self-rated health, medicine use last month and physical symptoms during the last 6 months were all more frequent in children reporting food insecurity. Controlling for age, gender and family affluence odds ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.23-2.06) (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984271 View in PubMed
Documents
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Assessing the relevance of neighbourhood characteristics to the household food security of low-income Toronto families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145125
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jul;13(7):1139-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Boulevard EPN 4005, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. sharon.kirkpatrick@nih.gov
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jul;13(7):1139-48
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hunger
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario
Poverty
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Although the sociodemographic characteristics of food-insecure households have been well documented, there has been little examination of neighbourhood characteristics in relation to this problem. In the present study we examined the association between household food security and neighbourhood features including geographic food access and perceived neighbourhood social capital.
Cross-sectional survey and mapping of discount supermarkets and community food programmes.
Twelve high-poverty neighbourhoods in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Respondents from 484 low-income families who had children and who lived in rental accommodations.
Food insecurity was pervasive, affecting two-thirds of families with about a quarter categorized as severely food insecure, indicative of food deprivation. Food insecurity was associated with household factors including income and income source. However, food security did not appear to be mitigated by proximity to food retail or community food programmes, and high rates of food insecurity were observed in neighbourhoods with good geographic food access. While low perceived neighbourhood social capital was associated with higher odds of food insecurity, this effect did not persist once we accounted for household sociodemographic factors.
Our findings raise questions about the extent to which neighbourhood-level interventions to improve factors such as food access or social cohesion can mitigate problems of food insecurity that are rooted in resource constraints. In contrast, the results reinforce the importance of household-level characteristics and highlight the need for interventions to address the financial constraints that underlie problems of food insecurity.
PubMed ID
20196916 View in PubMed
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The assessment of food security in homeless individuals: a comparison of the Food Security Survey Module and the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133107
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Dec;14(12):2254-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Anna C Holland
Matthew C Kennedy
Stephen W Hwang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Dec;14(12):2254-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Software
United States
Abstract
To compare the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS), the US Food Security Survey Module (US FSSM) and a modified version of the US FSSM in which references to buying food were changed to references to getting food, in terms of their classification of food security levels among homeless individuals, and to determine which of these instruments was most preferred by homeless individuals.
A cross-sectional survey.
Recruitment of participants took place at seven shelters and from three drop-in programmes that serve homeless individuals in Toronto, Canada.
Fifty individuals who were =18 years of age, able to communicate in English and currently homeless.
The modified US FSSM assigned 20% of participants to a lower ordinal food security category compared with the US FSSM, and only 8% to a higher food security category. The HFIAS assigned 30% of participants to a lower food security category compared with either the US FSSM or the modified US FSSM, and only 10-16% of participants to a higher food security category. When asked to compare all three instruments, the majority of respondents (62%) selected the HFIAS as the best instrument for people who are homeless.
A majority of homeless individuals selected the HFIAS as the best food security instrument for people who are homeless. Our findings suggest that the HFIAS is a more appropriate instrument than the US FSSM for measuring food security in the homeless population.
PubMed ID
21740619 View in PubMed
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The association between food insecurity and mortality among HIV-infected individuals on HAART.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149141
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2009 Nov 1;52(3):342-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2009
Author
Sheri D Weiser
Kimberly A Fernandes
Eirikka K Brandson
Viviane D Lima
Aranka Anema
David R Bangsberg
Julio S Montaner
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Positive Health Program, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-1372, USA. sheri.weiser@ucsf.edu
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2009 Nov 1;52(3):342-9
Date
Nov-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty
Risk factors
Thinness
Abstract
Food insecurity is increasingly recognized as a barrier to optimal treatment outcomes, but there is little data on this issue. We assessed associations between food insecurity and mortality among HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-treated individuals in Vancouver, British Columbia, and whether body max index (BMI) modified associations.
Individuals were recruited from the British Columbia HIV/AIDS drug treatment program in 1998 and 1999 and were followed until June 2007 for outcomes. Food insecurity was measured with the Radimer/Cornell questionnaire. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine associations between food insecurity, BMI, and nonaccidental deaths when controlling for confounders.
Among 1119 participants, 536 (48%) were categorized as food insecure and 160 (14%) were categorized as underweight (BMI
Notes
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PubMed ID
19675463 View in PubMed
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Associations between household food insecurity and health outcomes in the Aboriginal population (excluding reserves).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132094
Source
Health Rep. 2011 Jun;22(2):15-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Noreen Willows
Paul Veugelers
Kim Raine
Stefan Kuhle
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2T4. willows@ualberta.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2011 Jun;22(2):15-20
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental health
Nutrition Surveys
Quality of Life
Smoking - ethnology
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal people are more vulnerable to food insecurity and morbidity than is the Canadian population overall. However, little information is available about the association between food insecurity and health in Aboriginal households.
Data from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition were used to examine the relationships between household food security and self-reported health, well-being and health behaviours in a sample of 837 Aboriginal adults living off reserve. Household food security status was based on Health Canada's interpretation of the United States Household Food Security Survey Module. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify significant relationships, while adjusting for potential confounders.
An estimated 29% of Aboriginal people aged 18 or older lived in food-insecure households. They were more likely to report poor general and mental health, life dissatisfaction, a very weak sense of community belonging, high stress and cigarette smoking, compared with their counterparts in food-secure households. When age, gender and household education were taken into account, respondents from food-insecure households had significantly higher odds of poor general health, high stress, life dissatisfaction, and a very weak community belonging.
Reductions in household food insecurity may improve the health and well-being of Aboriginals living off-reserve.
PubMed ID
21848128 View in PubMed
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Change in paternal grandmothers' early food supply influenced cardiovascular mortality of the female grandchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104943
Source
BMC Genet. 2014;15:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lars Olov Bygren
Petter Tinghög
John Carstensen
Sören Edvinsson
Gunnar Kaati
Marcus E Pembrey
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. lars.olov.bygren@ki.se.
Source
BMC Genet. 2014;15:12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - genetics - mortality
Diet
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inheritance Patterns
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Status - genetics
Pedigree
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether large fluctuations in food availability during grandparents' early development influenced grandchildren's cardiovascular mortality. We reported earlier that changes in availability of food - from good to poor or from poor to good - during intrauterine development was followed by a double risk of sudden death as an adult, and that mortality rate can be associated with ancestors' childhood availability of food. We have now studied transgenerational responses (TGR) to sharp differences of harvest between two consecutive years' for ancestors of 317 people in Överkalix, Sweden.
The confidence intervals were very wide but we found a striking TGR. There was no response in cardiovascular mortality in the grandchild from sharp changes of early exposure, experienced by three of the four grandparents (maternal grandparents and paternal grandfathers). If, however, the paternal grandmother up to puberty lived through a sharp change in food supply from one year to next, her sons' daughters had an excess risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.05-6.92). Selection or learning and imitation are unlikely explanations. X-linked epigenetic inheritance via spermatozoa seemed to be plausible, with the transmission, limited to being through the father, possibly explained by the sex differences in meiosis.
The shock of change in food availability seems to give specific transgenerational responses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24552514 View in PubMed
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The characteristics and experience of community food program users in arctic Canada: a case study from Iqaluit, Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123211
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:464
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
James Ford
Marie-Pierre Lardeau
Will Vanderbilt
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. james.ford@mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:464
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Assistance - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nunavut - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Community food programs (CFPs), including soup kitchens and food banks, are a recent development in larger settlements in the Canadian Arctic. Our understanding of utilization of these programs is limited as food systems research has not studied the marginalised and transient populations using CFPs, constraining service planning for some of the most vulnerable community members. This paper reports on a baseline study conducted with users of CFPs in Iqaluit, Nunavut, to identify and characterize utilization and document their food security experience.
Open ended interviews and a fixed-choice survey on a census (n?=?94) were conducted with of users of the food bank, soup kitchen, and friendship centre over a 1?month period, along with key informant interviews.
Users of CFPs are more likely to be Inuit, be unemployed, and have not completed high school compared to the general Iqaluit population, while also reporting high dependence on social assistance, low household income, and an absence of hunters in the household. The majority report using CFPs for over a year and on a regular basis.
The inability of users to obtain sufficient food must be understood in the context of socio-economic transformations that have affected Inuit society over the last half century as former semi-nomadic hunting groups were resettled into permanent settlements. The resulting livelihood changes profoundly affected how food is produced, processed, distributed, and consumed, and the socio-cultural relationships surrounding such activities. Consequences have included the rising importance of material resources for food access, the weakening of social safety mechanisms through which more vulnerable community members would have traditionally been supported, and acculturative stress. Addressing these broader challenges is essential for food policy, yet CFPs also have an essential role in providing for those who would otherwise have limited food access.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22720722 View in PubMed
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Chronic physical and mental health conditions among adults may increase vulnerability to household food insecurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107674
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Nov;143(11):1785-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Valerie Tarasuk
Andrew Mitchell
Lindsay McLaren
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, and.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Nov;143(11):1785-93
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Analyses of cross-sectional population survey data in Canada and the United States have indicated that household food insecurity is associated with poorer self-rated health and multiple chronic conditions. The causal inference has been that household food insecurity contributes to poorer health, but there has been little consideration of how adults' health status may relate to households' vulnerability to food insecurity. Our objectives were to examine how the presence of an adult with one or more chronic physical or mental health conditions affects the odds of a household being food insecure and how the chronic ill-health of an adult within a food-insecure household affects the severity of that household's food insecurity. Using household- and respondent-level data available for 77,053 adults aged 18-64 y from the 2007-2008 Canadian Community Health Survey, we applied logistic regression analyses, controlling for household sociodemographic characteristics, to examine the association between health and household food insecurity. Most chronic conditions increased the odds of household food insecurity independent of household sociodemographic characteristics. Compared with adults with no chronic condition, the odds of household food insecurity were 1.43 (95% CI: 1.28, 1.59), 1.86 (95% CI: 1.62, 2.14), and 3.44 (95% CI: 3.02, 3.93) for adults with 1, 2, and 3 or more chronic conditions, respectively. Among food-insecure households, adults with multiple chronic conditions had higher odds of severe household food insecurity than adults with no chronic condition. The chronic ill-health of adults may render their households more vulnerable to food insecurity. This has important practice implications for health professionals who can identify and assist those at risk, but it also suggests that appropriate chronic disease management may reduce the prevalence and severity of food insecurity.
PubMed ID
23986364 View in PubMed
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Classifying neighbourhoods by level of access to stores selling fresh fruit and vegetables and groceries: identifying problematic areas in the city of Gatineau, Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114426
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e433-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Adrian C Gould
Philippe Apparicio
Marie-Soleil Cloutier
Author Affiliation
Centre Urbanisation Culture Société, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Montréal, QC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e433-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Geographic Mapping
Humans
Quebec
Residence Characteristics - classification
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Physical access to stores selling groceries, fresh fruit and vegetables (FV) is essential for urban dwellers. In Canadian cities where low-density development practices are common, social and material deprivation may be compounded by poor geographic access to healthy food. This case study examines access to food stores selling fresh FV in Gatineau, Quebec, to identify areas where poor access is coincident with high deprivation.
Food retailers were identified using two secondary sources and each store was visited to establish the total surface area devoted to the sale of fresh FV. Four population-weighted accessibility measures were then calculated for each dissemination area (DA) using road network distances. A deprivation index was created using variables from the 2006 Statistics Canada census, also at the scale of the DA. Finally, six classes of accessibility to a healthy diet were constructed using a k-means classification procedure. These were mapped and superimposed over high deprivation areas.
Overall, deprivation is positively correlated with better accessibility. However, more than 18,000 residents (7.5% of the population) live in high deprivation areas characterized by large distances to the nearest retail food store (means of 1.4 km or greater) and virtually no access to fresh FV within walking distance (radius of 1 km).
In this research, we identified areas where poor geographic access may introduce an additional constraint for residents already dealing with the challenges of limited financial and social resources. Our results may help guide local food security policies and initiatives.
PubMed ID
23618023 View in PubMed
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