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Collaborating toward improving food security in Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107695
Source
Pages 803-810 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):803-810
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Wakegijig
Geraldine Osborne
Sara Statham
Michelle Doucette Issaluk
Author Affiliation
Government of Nunavut Department of Health, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.
Source
Pages 803-810 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):803-810
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Nunavut
Poverty - prevention & control
Quality Improvement
Abstract
Community members, Aboriginal organizations, public servants and academics have long been describing a desperate situation of food insecurity in the Eastern Canadian Arctic.
The Nunavut Food Security Coalition, a partnership of Inuit Organizations and the Government of Nunavut, is collaborating to develop a territorial food security strategy to address pervasive food insecurity in the context of poverty reduction.
The Nunavut Food Security Coalition has carried out this work using a community consultation model. The research was collected through community visits, stakeholder consultation and member checking at the Nunavut Food Security Symposium.
In this paper, we describe a continuous course of action, based on community engagement and collective action, that has led to sustained political interest in and public mobilization around the issue of food insecurity in Nunavut.
The process described in this article is a unique collaboration between multiple organizations that has led to the development of a sustainable partnership that will inform policy development while representing the voice of Nunavummiut.
Notes
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Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-5321753059
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-6121560272
PubMed ID
23984307 View in PubMed
Documents
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Development of a strategic plan for food security and safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261813
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73:25091
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Myriam Fillion
Brian Laird
Vasiliki Douglas
Linda Van Pelt
Diane Archie
Hing Man Chan
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73:25091
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education - organization & administration
Female
Food Supply - methods
Health Planning - organization & administration
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Northwest Territories
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Safety
Abstract
Current social and environmental changes in the Arctic challenge the health and well-being of its residents. Developing evidence-informed adaptive measures in response to these changes is a priority for communities, governments and researchers.
To develop strategic planning to promote food security and food safety in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR), Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada.
A qualitative study using group discussions during a workshop.
A regional workshop gathered Inuit organizations and community representatives, university-based researchers from the Inuit Health Survey (IHS) and NWT governmental organizations. Discussions were structured around the findings from the IHS. For each key area, programs and activities were identified and prioritized by group discussion and voting.
The working group developed a vision for future research and intervention, which is to empower communities to promote health, well-being and environmental sustainability in the ISR. The group elaborated missions for the region that address the following issues: (a) capacity building within communities; (b) promotion of the use of traditional foods to address food security; (c) research to better understand the linkages between diseases and contaminants in traditional foods, market foods and lifestyle choices; (d) and promotion of affordable housing. Five programs to address each key area were developed as follows: harvest support and traditional food sharing; education and promotion; governance and policy; research; and housing. Concrete activities were identified to guide future research and intervention projects.
The results of the planning workshop provide a blueprint for future research and intervention projects.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
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Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):488-9722005728
PubMed ID
25147772 View in PubMed
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[Development of the system of dietary nutrition in the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107550
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Jun;334(6):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
P P Makarov
S M Kuznetsov
S G Kuz'min
S A Novoselov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 Jun;334(6):20-3
Date
Jun-2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Food Preservation - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - standards
Food Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - standards
Food Supply - methods - standards
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Nutritive Value
Russia
Abstract
The analysis of the existing system of organization dietary personnel in the Armed Forces has been done. The new system of improvement of dietary nutrition for military personnel was developed. This system is based on scientifically proven food rationings that provide a balance of nutrients and mechanical and chemical sparing of GI tract. For the purpose of evalution of the given system the research was conducted. Two test groups were formed. First group (control) got dietary nutrition according to the current system; second group (experimental) got dietary nutrition according to the developed system. In 3 months, experimental group showed the significant improvement of health record. Control group had no significant changes. Obtained results show the prospects of developed dietary nutrition.
PubMed ID
24000633 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with the intake of traditional foods in the Eeyou Istchee (Cree) of northern Quebec include age, speaking the Cree language and food sovereignty indicators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299315
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1536251
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Willows Noreen
Louise Johnson-Down
Moubarac Jean-Claude
Michel Lucas
Elizabeth Robinson
Malek Batal
Author Affiliation
a Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science , University of Alberta , Edmonton , AB , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1536251
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Blood glucose
Blood pressure
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - methods
Health Behavior
Humans
Indians, North American
Language
Lipids - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Eeyouch are a First Nations (Cree) population that live above 49.6°N latitude in Eeyou Istchee in northern Quebec. Eeyouch rely on traditional foods (TF) hunted, fished or gathered from the land. The overarching aim of this study was to achieve an understanding of the factors associated with TF intake among Eeyouch. Data were from 465 women and 330 men who participated in the Nituuchischaayihtitaau Aschii Multi-Community Environment-and-Health (E&H) study. The relationship between TF consumption and dietary, health, sociodemographic and food sovereignty (i.e. being a hunter or receiving Income Security to hunt, trap or fish) variables was examined using linear and logistic regression. Analyses were stratified by sex because of the male/female discrepancy in being a hunter. Among respondents, almost all (99.7%) consumed TF, 51% were hunters and 10% received Income Security. Higher intake of TF was associated with lower consumption of less nutritious ultra-processed products (UPP). In women, TF intake increased with age, hunting and receiving Income Security, but decreased with high school education. In men, TF intake increased with age and speaking only Cree at home. The findings suggest that increased food sovereignty would result in improved diet quality among Eeyouch through increased TF intake and decreased UPP intake.
PubMed ID
30360700 View in PubMed
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Implementation of a community greenhouse in a remote, sub-Arctic First Nations community in Ontario, Canada: a descriptive case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260050
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14(2):2545
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
K. Skinner
R M Hanning
J. Metatawabin
L J S Tsuji
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2014;14(2):2545
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Female
Food Supply - methods
Gardening - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Ontario
Seasons
Weather
Abstract
Food insecurity is prevalent in northern communities in Canada and there is a movement to improve food security through both the re-vitalization of traditional harvesting practices as well as through sustainable agriculture initiatives. Gardening in northern communities can be difficult and may be aided by a community greenhouse. The objective of this project was to conduct a descriptive case study of the context and process surrounding the implementation of a community greenhouse in a remote, sub-Arctic First Nations community in Ontario, Canada.
Data sources included semi-directed interviews with a purposive and snowball sample of key informants (n=14), direct observations (n=32 days), written documentation (n=107), and photo-documentation (n=621 total). Digital photographs were taken by both a university investigator during community visits and a community investigator throughout the entire project. The case study was carried out over 33 months; from early 2009 until October of 2011. Thematic data analyses were conducted and followed a categorical aggregation approach.
Categories emerging from the data were appointed gardening-related themes: seasons, fertile ground, sustainability, gardeners, ownership, participant growth, and sunshine. Local champions were critical to project success. Uncertainty was expressed by several participants regarding ownership of the greenhouse; the local community members who championed the project had to emphasize, repeatedly, that it was community owned. Positive outcomes included the involvement of many community members, a host of related activities, and that the greenhouse has been a learning opportunity to gain knowledge about growing plants in a northern greenhouse setting. A strength of the project was that many children participated in greenhouse activities.
Community and school greenhouse projects require local champions to be successful. It is important to establish guidelines around ownership of a greenhouse and suitable procedures for making the building accessible to everyone without compromising security. Implementing a greenhouse project can engage community members, including children, and provide a great learning opportunity for gardeners in a remote, northern community.
PubMed ID
24959925 View in PubMed
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Rebuilding northern foodsheds, sustainable food systems, community well-being, and food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107889
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
S Craig Gerlach
Philip A Loring
Author Affiliation
Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99712, USA. scgerlach@alaska.edu
Source
Pages 87-90 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):87-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Culture
Diet - ethnology
Environment
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Multiple climatic, environmental and socio-economic pressures have accumulated to the point where they interfere with the ability of remote rural Alaska Native communities to achieve food security with locally harvestable food resources. The harvest of wild foods has been the historical norm, but most Alaska Native villages are transitioning to a cash economy, with increasing reliance on industrially produced, store-bought foods, and with less reliable access to and reliance on wild, country foods. While commercially available market foods provide one measure of food security, the availability and quality of market foods are subject to the vagaries and vulnerabilities of the global food system; access is dependent on one's ability to pay, is limited to what is available on the shelves of small rural stores, and, store-bought foods do not fulfill the important roles that traditional country foods play in rural communities and cultures. Country food access is also constrained by rising prices of fuel and equipment, a federal and state regulatory framework that sometimes hinders rather than helps rural subsistence users who need to access traditional food resources, a regulatory framework that is often not responsive to changes in climate, weather and seasonality, and a shifting knowledge base in younger generations about how to effectively harvest, process and store wild foods.
The general objective is to provide a framework for understanding the social, cultural, ecological and political dimensions of rural Alaska Native food security, and to provide information on the current trends in rural Alaska Native food systems.
This research is based on our long-term ethnographic, subsistence and food systems work in coastal and interior Alaska. This includes research about the land mammal harvest, the Yukon River and coastal fisheries, community and village gardens, small livestock production and red meat systems that are scaled appropriately to village size and capacity, and food-system intervention strategies designed to rebuild local and rural foodsheds and to restore individual and community health.
The contemporary cultural, economic and nutrition transition has severe consequences for the health of people and for the viability of rural communities, and in ways that are not well tracked by the conventional food security methodologies and frameworks. This article expands the discussion of food security and is premised on a holistic model that integrates the social, cultural, ecological, psychological and biomedical aspects of individual and community health.
We propose a new direction for food-system design that prioritizes the management of place-based food portfolios above the more conventional management of individual resources, one with a commitment to as much local and regional food production and/or harvest for local and regional consumption as is possible, and to community self-reliance and health for rural Alaska Natives.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
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PubMed ID
23967414 View in PubMed
Documents
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Retail food environments, shopping experiences, First Nations and the provincial Norths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295632
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Oct; 37(10):333-341
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Kristin Burnett
Kelly Skinner
Travis Hay
Joseph LeBlanc
Lori Chambers
Author Affiliation
Department of Indigenous Learning, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can. 2017 Oct; 37(10):333-341
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Canada
Economic Competition
Food - economics
Food Industry - methods - organization & administration
Food Supply - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Manitoba
Marketing
Ontario
Saskatchewan
Abstract
This paper looks at the market food environments of First Nations communities located in the provincial Norths by examining the potential retail competition faced by the North West Company (NWC) and by reporting on the grocery shopping experiences of people living in northern Canada.
We employed two methodological approaches to assess northern retail food environments. First, we mapped food retailers in the North to examine the breadth of retail competition in the provincial Norths, focussing specifically on those communities without year-round road access. Second, we surveyed people living in communities in northern Canada about their retail and shopping experiences.
Fifty-four percent of communities in the provincial Norths and Far North without year-round road access did not have a grocery store that competed with the NWC. The provinces with the highest percentage of northern communities without retail competition were Ontario (87%), Saskatchewan (83%) and Manitoba (72%). Respondents to the survey (n = 92) expressed concern about their shopping experiences in three main areas: the cost of food, food quality and freshness, and availability of specific foods.
There is limited retail competition in the provincial Norths. In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Ontario, the NWC has no store competition in at least 70% of northern communities. Consumers living in northern Canada find it difficult to afford nutritious foods and would like access to a wider selection of perishable foods in good condition.
Cet article porte sur l'environnement de la vente d’aliments dans les collectivités des Premières nations du nord des provinces, en particulier sur la concurrence éventuelle dans la vente au détail de la North West Company (NWC) ainsi que sur les expériences d'achats alimentaires de la population vivant dans le Nord canadien.
Nous avons utilisé deux méthodologies pour évaluer l’environnement alimentaire de la vente au détail dans le Nord. D’abord, nous avons cartographié les détaillants en alimentation du Nord afin d’examiner le degré de concurrence au détail dans les régions nordiques, en prêtant une attention particulière aux collectivités qui ne sont pas accessibles à l’année par la route. Ensuite, nous avons enquêté auprès des personnes vivant dans les collectivités du Nord canadien à propos de leurs expériences d’achat au détail et de magasinage.
Cinquante-quatre pour cent des collectivités du nord des provinces et du Grand Nord n’avaient aucune épicerie en concurrence avec la NWC. Les provinces comptant les plus fortes proportions de collectivités nordiques sans concurrence dans la vente au détail étaient l’Ontario (87 %), la Saskatchewan (83 %) et le Manitoba (72 %). Les participants au sondage (n = 92) ont fait état de leurs préoccupations quant à leurs expériences d'achat dans trois grands secteurs : le coût des aliments, la qualité et la fraîcheur des aliments et la disponibilité de certains aliments.
La concurrence dans la vente au détail est limitée dans le nord des provinces. Au Manitoba, en Saskatchewan et en Ontario, la NWC ne fait face à aucune concurrence dans au moins 70 % des collectivités nordiques. Les consommateurs du Nord canadien considèrent que les aliments nutritifs sont peu abordables, et ils souhaitent avoir accès à un plus grand choix d’aliments périssables en bon état.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29043760 View in PubMed
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Sharing-based social capital associated with harvest production and wealth in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292459
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(3):e0193759
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Elspeth Ready
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(3):e0193759
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Arctic regions - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Community Networks
Crops, Agricultural
Female
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Inuits
Male
Models, Theoretical
Regression Analysis
Social capital
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Social institutions that facilitate sharing and redistribution may help mitigate the impact of resource shocks. In the North American Arctic, traditional food sharing may direct food to those who need it and provide a form of natural insurance against temporal variability in hunting returns within households. Here, network properties that facilitate resource flow (network size, quality, and density) are examined in a country food sharing network comprising 109 Inuit households from a village in Nunavik (Canada), using regressions to investigate the relationships between these network measures and household socioeconomic attributes. The results show that although single women and elders have larger networks, the sharing network is not structured to prioritize sharing towards households with low food availability. Rather, much food sharing appears to be driven by reciprocity between high-harvest households, meaning that poor, low-harvest households tend to have less sharing-based social capital than more affluent, high-harvest households. This suggests that poor, low-harvest households may be more vulnerable to disruptions in the availability of country food.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29529040 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.