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Disparities in fruit and vegetable supply: a potential health concern in the greater Qu├ębec City area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151700
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Nov;12(11):2051-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Nathalie Pouliot
Anne-Marie Hamelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada, G1V 0A6.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Nov;12(11):2051-9
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce - economics - standards
Diet - economics - standards
Food Supply - economics - standards
Fruit - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Quebec
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Vegetables - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
The present study explores the spatial distribution and in-store availability of fresh fruits and vegetables from a socio-environmental perspective in terms of the type of food store, level of deprivation and the setting (urban/rural) where the food outlets are located.
Seven types of fresh fruit and vegetable stores (FVS) were identified then visited in six districts (urban setting) and seven communities (rural setting). The quantity and diversity of fresh fruits and vegetables (F&V) were also assessed.
Québec City, Canada.
The FVS spatial distribution showed differences between the two settings, with accessibility to supermarkets being more limited in rural settings. The quantity and diversity of fresh F&V in-store availability were associated with the type of FVS, but not with setting or its level of deprivation. Greengrocers and supermarkets offered a greater quantity and diversity of fresh F&V than the other FVS.
The results suggest that inequalities in physical access to fresh F&V across the region could have an impact on public health planning considering that supermarkets, which are one of the excellent sources of F&V, are less prevalent in rural settings.
PubMed ID
19344543 View in PubMed
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Does economic inequality affect child malnutrition? The case of Ecuador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177953
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Jan;60(1):165-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Carlos Larrea
Ichiro Kawachi
Author Affiliation
FLACSO-Ecuador, Harvard Center for Society and Health, Harvard University, Av. De las Palmeras N45-159, Dpto. 101-C, Quito, Ecuador. clarrea_2000@yahoo.com
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Jan;60(1):165-78
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Dwarfism - economics - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - standards
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Protein-Energy Malnutrition - economics - epidemiology
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Conditions - economics
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Economic inequality has been hypothesized to be a determinant of population health, independent of poverty and household income. We examined the association between economic inequality and child malnutrition in Ecuador. Economic inequality was measured by the Gini coefficient of household per capita consumption, estimated from the 1990 Census. Childhood stunting, assessed from height-for-age z scores, was obtained from the 1998 Living Standards Measurement Survey (LSMS). We controlled for a range of individual and household covariates, including per capita food consumption, education, housing, ethnicity, fertility, access to health services, diarrhea morbidity, child care, mother's age and diet composition. Stunting still affects 26% of children under five in Ecuador, with higher prevalence in the rural Highlands and among indigenous peoples. Maternal education, basic housing conditions, access to health services, ethnicity, fertility, maternal age and diet composition were independently associated with stunting. However, after controlling for relevant covariates, economic inequality at the provincial scale had a statistically significant deleterious effect on stunting. At municipal or local levels, inequality was not associated with stunting.
PubMed ID
15482876 View in PubMed
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Do healthy food baskets assess food security?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183764
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tasnim Nathoo
Jean Shoveller
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, James Mather Building, 5804 Fairview Avenue, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. tasmin@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ecology - methods
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - standards
Humans
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Population Surveillance - methods
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Developing indicators to measure the different facets of food security presents numerous conceptual and methodological challenges. This paper adopts an ecological framework to reflect on these issues through an examination of the Healthy Food Basket (HFB) tool. The HFB tool is used to measure food security conditions by determining the cost and availability of a group of foods in a shopping basket across a range of stores in different regions and neighbourhoods. The paper discusses the ability of the HFB tool to describe micro-, meso- and macro-level influences on food security and the use of the ecological model in developing complementary and alternative strategies for understanding and monitoring food security.
PubMed ID
12959676 View in PubMed
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Food and water security issues in Russia I: food security in the general population of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105147
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21848
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Pavel R Alloyarov
Valery S Chupakhin
Eugenia V Dushkina
Yuliya N Sladkova
Vitaliy M Dorofeyev
Tatijana A Kolesnikova
Kirill B Fridman
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21848
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Far East - epidemiology
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Food Microbiology - statistics & numerical data
Food Safety
Food Supply - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Malnutrition - economics - epidemiology - etiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements - physiology
Russia - epidemiology
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Problems related to food security in Russian Arctic (dietary imbalance, predominance of carbohydrates, shortage of milk products, vegetables and fruits, deficit of vitamins and microelements, chemical, infectious and parasitic food contamination) have been defined in the literature. But no standard protocol of food security assessment has been used in the majority of studies.
Our aim was to obtain food security indicators, identified within an Arctic collaboration, for selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, and to compare food safety in these territories.
In 18 regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, the following indicators of food security were analyzed: food costs, food consumption, and chemical and biological food contamination for the period 2000-2011.
Food costs in the regions are high, comprising 23-43% of household income. Only 4 out of 10 food groups (fish products, cereals, sugar, plant oil) are consumed in sufficient amounts. The consumption of milk products, eggs, vegetables, potatoes, fruits (and berries) is severely low in a majority of the selected regions. There are high levels of biological contamination of food in many regions. The biological and chemical contamination situation is alarming, especially in Chukotka. Only 7 food pollutants are under regular control; among pesticides, only DDT. Evenki AO and Magadan Oblast have reached peak values in food contaminants compared with other regions. Mercury in local fish has not been analyzed in the majority of the regions. In 3 regions, no monitoring of DDT occurs. Aflatoxins have not been analyzed in 5 regions. Nitrates had the highest percentage in excess of the hygienic threshold in all regions. Excesses of other pollutants in different regions were episodic and as a rule not high.
Improvement of the food supply and food accessibility in the regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East is of utmost importance. Both quantitative and qualitative control of chemical and biological contaminants in food is insufficient and demands radical enhancement aimed at improving food security.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24471055 View in PubMed
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The high cost of a nutritionally adequate diet in four Yukon communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35681
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Sep-Oct;85(5):310-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
E E Wein
Author Affiliation
Canadian Circumpolar Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Sep-Oct;85(5):310-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Food - economics
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Services - economics
Food Supply - economics - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Poverty
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Yukon Territory
Abstract
The cost of purchasing a nutritionally adequate diet in four Yukon communities was examined, based on the 46 food items and quantities of the federal government's Northern Food Basket. In Old Crow, unit purchase prices were on average 250% of those in Edmonton, while in three southern Yukon communities, unit purchase prices were about 125% of those in Edmonton. In quantities needed to meet weekly nutrient needs of a family of four, the cost in Old Crow was 320% of that in Edmonton, while in three southern Yukon communities, it was 140%. It appears that due to financial necessity, Yukon aboriginal people need continuing access to traditional food resources (wild game animals, birds, fish and berries). Since the Northern Food Basket does not include any traditional foods, it alone is of limited acceptability to these people. The high cost of marketed food and the role of traditional foods in contemporary diets should be considered in giving dietary advice and in determining food allowances in social assistance programs.
PubMed ID
7804933 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic estimation a state of nutrition of infant and preschool children age of city of Murmansk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175838
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2004;73(5):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
S V Dmitrievskaia
A V Istomin
A A Korolev
L A Lukicheva
E I Nikitenko
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2004;73(5):6-10
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Food Supply - economics - standards
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - economics - standards
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nutrition Policy - economics
Nutrition Surveys
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The present research was directed on study of an actual meal and status of nutrition of children in the age of from birth till 5 years living in Murmansk (region of Far North). 998 children were surveyed. At an estimation of an actual meal of children the data about breast feeding are received, the basic nutrients misbalance of structure of diets of children are established, and their reasons are analyzed. On the basis of the received data the regional recommendations for organization of a healthy meal in children's preschool establishments and program of hygienic training of the parents to skills of a balanced diet of children of early and junior age were developed.
PubMed ID
15754479 View in PubMed
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Perception of needs and responses in food security: divergence between households and stakeholders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155395
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Dec;11(12):1389-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Hamelin
Céline Mercier
Annie Bédard
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Pavillon Paul-Comtois, Université Laval, 2425 rue de l'Agriculture, Québec City, Canada G1V 0A6. anne-marie.hamelin@aln.ulaval.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Dec;11(12):1389-96
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Food - standards
Food Supply - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Perception
Poverty
Public Assistance
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was (i) to describe the needs of food-insecure households and their assessment of community programmes, as expressed by households and perceived by stakeholders; and (ii) to examine the similarities and differences between households' and stakeholders' perceptions in Quebec City area.
A semi-structured interview and sociodemographic questionnaire with fifty-five households and fifty-nine stakeholders (community workers, managers, donor agencies). The transcriptions were subjected to content analysis and inter-coder reliability measurement.
The respondents' perceptions converge towards three main categories of needs: needs specific to food security, conditions necessary for achieving food security and related needs. There was agreement on the necessity of better financial resources, although the impact of financial resources alone may be uncertain in the opinion of some stakeholders. Different perceptions of needs and of their fulfilment by community programmes emerge between both groups. Despite households found positive aspects, they complained that quality of food and access were major needs neglected. Their account suggests overall a partial fit between the programmes and food security needs; even a combination of programmes (e.g. collective kitchens, purchasing groups, community gardens) was insufficient to adequately meet these needs. In contrast, most stakeholders perceived that the household's primary need was a basic amount of food and that the households were satisfied with programmes.
It is urgent to evaluate the overall effect of community programmes on specific aspects of household food insecurity. The results emphasise that community programmes alone cannot bring about social change needed to prevent food insecurity.
PubMed ID
18761760 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.