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Affordability of a nutritious diet for income assistance recipients in Nova Scotia (2002-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121472
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricia L Williams
Cynthia G Watt
Michelle Amero
Barbara J Anderson
Ilya Blum
Rebecca Green-LaPierre
Christine P Johnson
Debra E Reimer
Author Affiliation
Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS. patty.williams@msvu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 May-Jun;103(3):183-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - economics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Poverty - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Abstract
This study assessed the affordability of a basic nutritious diet for selected household types relying on income assistance (IA) by comparing potential incomes to the costs of the National Nutritious Food Basket (NNFB) and other essential expenditures in Nova Scotia from 2002 to 2010, and examined the adequacy of IA allowances during this time period.
The cost of the NNFB was surveyed across a random sample of grocery stores in NS during five time periods: 2002, 2004/05, 2007, 2008 and 2010, and was factored into affordability scenarios for three household types relying on IA: a family of four, a lone mother with three children, and a lone male. Essential monthly expenses were deducted from total net income to determine if adequate funds remained for the NNFB.
For each time period examined, the findings demonstrated that all household types faced a significant monthly deficit if they purchased a basic nutritious diet. In each household scenario, the potential monthly deficits increased from 2002 to 2010, ranging from $112 in 2002 for a lone mother with three children to $523 in 2010 for a lone male.
Despite increases in allowances, these findings suggest that the risk of food insecurity has increased for IA-dependent households in NS. To address this public health challenge, public health practitioners must advocate for integrated, progressive and sustainable social welfare policies that ensure that individuals and families relying on IA have adequate income and other supports to meet their basic needs, including access to a healthy diet.
PubMed ID
22905636 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the barriers to accessing food among food-insecure people in Cobourg, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133167
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Jun;31(3):121-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
S. Tsang
A M Holt
E. Azevedo
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease & Injury Prevention Department, Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit, Port Hope, Ontario, Canada. stsang@hkpr.on.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Jun;31(3):121-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Food Services
Food Supply - economics
Fruit - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Poverty
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Transportation
Vegetables - economics - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Low-income people are most vulnerable to food insecurity; many turn to community and/or charitable food programs to receive free or low-cost food. This needs assessment aims to collect information on the barriers to accessing food programs, the opportunities for improving food access, the barriers to eating fresh vegetables and fruit, and the opportunities to increasing their consumption among food-insecure people in Cobourg, Ontario.
We interviewed food program clients using structured individual interviews consisting of mostly opened-ended questions.
Food program clients identified barriers to using food programs as lack of transportation and the food programs having insufficient quantities of food or inconvenient operating hours. They also stated a lack of available vegetables and fruit at home, and income as barriers to eating more vegetables and fruit, but suggested a local fresh fruit and vegetable bulk-buying program called "Good Food Box" and community gardens as opportunities to help increase their vegetable and fruit intake.
Many of the barriers and opportunities identified can be addressed by working with community partners to help low-income individuals become more food secure.
PubMed ID
21733349 View in PubMed
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Associations between residential food environment and dietary patterns in urban-dwelling older adults: results from the VoisiNuAge study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122667
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Geneviève Mercille
Lucie Richard
Lise Gauvin
Yan Kestens
Bryna Shatenstein
Mark Daniel
Hélène Payette
Author Affiliation
Institut de recherche en santé publique de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. genevieve.mercille.1@umontreal.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2026-39
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Commerce
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Environment
Fast Foods
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Restaurants
Urban Population
Abstract
To examine associations between the availability of residential-area food sources and dietary patterns among seniors.
Cross-sectional analyses. Individual-level data from the NuAge study on nutrition and healthy ageing were merged with geographic information system data on food store availability and area-level social composition. Two dietary patterns reflecting lower- and higher-quality diets (respectively designated 'western' and 'prudent') were identified from FFQ data. Two food source relative availability measures were calculated for a 500 m road-network buffer around participants' homes: (i) proportion of fast-food outlets (%FFO) relative to all restaurants and (ii) proportion of stores potentially selling healthful foods (%HFS, healthful food stores) relative to all food stores. Associations between dietary patterns and food source exposure were tested in linear regression models accounting for individual (health and sociodemographic) and area-level (socio-economic and ethnicity) covariates.
Montréal metropolitan area, Canada.
Urban-dwelling older adults (n 751), aged 68 to 84 years.
%FFO was inversely associated with prudent diet (ß = -0·105; P
PubMed ID
22789436 View in PubMed
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Characterization of household food insecurity in Qu├ębec: food and feelings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191728
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Anne-Marie Hamelin
Micheline Beaudry
Jean-Pierre Habicht
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Research Division, Douglas Hospital Research Centre, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. anne.marie.hamelin@videotron.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-32
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - etiology
Diet
Family Characteristics
Family Health
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Hunger
Internal-External Control
Interviews as Topic
Male
Nutritional Status
Poverty - psychology
Quebec
Social Alienation
Urban Population
Abstract
This study was undertaken to understand food insecurity from the perspective of households who experienced it. The results of group interviews and personal interviews with 98 low-income households from urban and rural areas in and around Québec City, Canada, elicited the meaning of "enough food" for the households and the range of manifestations of food insecurity. Two classes of manifestations characterized the experience of food insecurity: (1) its core characteristics: a lack of food encompassing the shortage of food, the unsuitability of both food and diet and a preoccupation with continuity in access to enough food; and a lack of control of households over their food situation; and (2) a related set of potential reactions: socio-familial perturbations, hunger and physical impairment, and psychological suffering. The results substantiate the existence of food insecurity among Québecers and confirm that the nature of this experience is consistent with many of the core components identified in upstate New York. This study underlines the monotony of the diet, describes the feeling of alienation, differentiates between a lack of food and the reactions that it engenders, and emphasizes the dynamic nature of the experience.
PubMed ID
11820676 View in PubMed
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Comparability of household and individual food consumption data--evidence from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31647
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
W. Becker
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. wulf.becker@slv.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1177-82
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Data Collection - standards
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Eating
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Comparison of household and individual food consumption. DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS: Combined household and individual food consumption survey carried out in Sweden in 1989. A random sample of 3000 subjects aged 0-74 years, the household to which the subject belonged constituted the household unit. Each household recorded all the foods it purchased over a 4-week period, except food eaten outside the home. For the selected subject, excluding children
PubMed ID
11924944 View in PubMed
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Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: southern Sweden, 1766-1864.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79082
Source
Demography. 2006 Nov;43(4):727-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Bengtsson Tommy
Dribe Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Economic History, Lund University, P.O. Box 7083, 220 07 Lund, Sweden. Tommy.Bengtsson@ekh.lu.se
Source
Demography. 2006 Nov;43(4):727-46
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraception Behavior - history - psychology
Decision Making
Family Planning Services - economics - history - utilization
Female
Food Supply - economics
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Parturition
Rural Population - history
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In this article, we analyze fertility control in a rural population characterized by natural fertility, using survival analysis on a longitudinal data set at the individual level combined with food prices. Landless and semilandless families responded strongly to short-term economic stress stemming from changes in prices. The fertility response, both to moderate and large changes in food prices, was the strongest within six months after prices changed in the fall, which means that the response was deliberate. People foresaw bad times and planned their fertility accordingly. The result highlights the importance of deliberate control of the timing of childbirth before the fertility transition, not in order to achieve a certain family size but, as in this case, to reduce the negative impacts of short-term economic stress.
PubMed ID
17236544 View in PubMed
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Does economic inequality affect child malnutrition? The case of Ecuador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177953
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Jan;60(1):165-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Carlos Larrea
Ichiro Kawachi
Author Affiliation
FLACSO-Ecuador, Harvard Center for Society and Health, Harvard University, Av. De las Palmeras N45-159, Dpto. 101-C, Quito, Ecuador. clarrea_2000@yahoo.com
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Jan;60(1):165-78
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Dwarfism - economics - epidemiology
Female
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - standards
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Protein-Energy Malnutrition - economics - epidemiology
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Conditions - economics
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Economic inequality has been hypothesized to be a determinant of population health, independent of poverty and household income. We examined the association between economic inequality and child malnutrition in Ecuador. Economic inequality was measured by the Gini coefficient of household per capita consumption, estimated from the 1990 Census. Childhood stunting, assessed from height-for-age z scores, was obtained from the 1998 Living Standards Measurement Survey (LSMS). We controlled for a range of individual and household covariates, including per capita food consumption, education, housing, ethnicity, fertility, access to health services, diarrhea morbidity, child care, mother's age and diet composition. Stunting still affects 26% of children under five in Ecuador, with higher prevalence in the rural Highlands and among indigenous peoples. Maternal education, basic housing conditions, access to health services, ethnicity, fertility, maternal age and diet composition were independently associated with stunting. However, after controlling for relevant covariates, economic inequality at the provincial scale had a statistically significant deleterious effect on stunting. At municipal or local levels, inequality was not associated with stunting.
PubMed ID
15482876 View in PubMed
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Economic abuse and intra-household inequities in food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168387
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):258-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Elaine M Power
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Program, School of Physical and Health Education, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. power@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):258-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Nutritional Status
Poverty
Public Assistance
Public Health - economics
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - economics
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Food insecurity affected over 2.3 million Canadians in 2004. To date, the food security literature has not considered the potential impact of economic abuse on food security, but there are three ways in which these two important public health issues may be related: 1) victims of economic abuse are at risk of food insecurity when they are denied access to adequate financial resources; 2) the conditions that give rise to food insecurity may also precipitate intimate partner violence in all its forms; 3) women who leave economically abusive intimate heterosexual relationships are more likely to live in poverty and thus are at risk of food insecurity. This paper presents a case of one woman who, during a qualitative research interview, spontaneously reported economic abuse and heterosexual interpersonal violence. The economic abuse suffered by this participant appears to have affected her food security and that of her children, while her husband's was apparently unaffected. There is an urgent need to better understand the nature of intra-household food distribution in food-insecure households and the impact of economic abuse on its victims' food security. Such an understanding may lead to improved food security measurement tools and social policies to reduce food insecurity.
PubMed ID
16827421 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity in Canadian adults receiving diabetes care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120898
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):e261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Suzanne Galesloot
Lynn McIntyre
Tanis Fenton
Sheila Tyminski
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Services, Population and Public Health, Calgary Zone, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):e261-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Ambulatory Care
Diabetes mellitus
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Abstract
The prevalence of adult-level household food insecurity was examined among clients receiving outpatient diabetes health care services.
Participants were adults diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, who attended individual counselling sessions at Calgary's main clinic from January to April 2010. Clinicians were trained to administer the Household Food Security Survey Module (HFSSM), and did so with clients' assent during their scheduled sessions.
The prevalence of adult-level household food insecurity among 314 respondents was 15.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.2 to 19.4); 6.7% (95% CI, 4.2 to 10.0) of clinic attendees were categorized as severely food insecure. The comparable rates obtained in Alberta in 2007 using the same instrument (HFSSM) were 5.6% and 1.2%, respectively.
Household food insecurity rates among individuals with diabetes in active care are higher than rates reported in Canadian population surveys. Severe food insecurity, indicating reduced food intake and disrupted eating patterns, may affect this population's ability to follow a pattern of healthy eating necessary for effective diabetes management. This study reinforces the importance of assessing clients' inability to access food because of financial constraints, and indicates that screening with a validated measure may facilitate identification of clients at risk.
PubMed ID
22958632 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity is associated with nutrient inadequacies among Canadian adults and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158692
Source
J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):604-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2. sharon.kirkpatrick@utoronto.ca
Source
J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):604-12
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Eating
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Infant
Male
Malnutrition
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Household food insecurity constrains food selection, but whether the dietary compromises associated with this problem heighten the risk of nutrient inadequacies is unclear. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between household food security status and adults' and children's dietary intakes and to estimate the prevalence of nutrient inadequacies among adults and children, differentiating by household food security status. We analyzed 24-h recall and household food security data for persons aged 1-70 y from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey (cycle 2.2). The relationship between adults' and children's nutrient and food intakes and household food security status was assessed using regression analysis. Estimates of the prevalence of inadequate nutrient intakes by food security status and age/sex group were calculated using probability assessment methods. Poorer dietary intakes were observed among adolescents and adults in food-insecure households and many of the differences by food security status persisted after accounting for potential confounders in multivariate analyses. Higher estimated prevalences of nutrient inadequacy were apparent among adolescents and adults in food-insecure households, with the differences most marked for protein, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, folate, vitamin B-12, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. Among children, few differences in dietary intakes by household food security status were apparent and there was little indication of nutrient inadequacy. This study indicates that for adults and, to some degree, adolescents, food insecurity is associated with inadequate nutrient intakes. These findings highlight the need for concerted public policy responses to ameliorate household food insecurity.
Notes
Erratum In: J Nutr. 2008 Jul;138(7):1399
PubMed ID
18287374 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.