Skip header and navigation

Refine By

12 records – page 1 of 2.

Characterization of household food insecurity in Qu├ębec: food and feelings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191728
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Anne-Marie Hamelin
Micheline Beaudry
Jean-Pierre Habicht
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Research Division, Douglas Hospital Research Centre, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. anne.marie.hamelin@videotron.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-32
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - etiology
Diet
Family Characteristics
Family Health
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Hunger
Internal-External Control
Interviews as Topic
Male
Nutritional Status
Poverty - psychology
Quebec
Social Alienation
Urban Population
Abstract
This study was undertaken to understand food insecurity from the perspective of households who experienced it. The results of group interviews and personal interviews with 98 low-income households from urban and rural areas in and around Québec City, Canada, elicited the meaning of "enough food" for the households and the range of manifestations of food insecurity. Two classes of manifestations characterized the experience of food insecurity: (1) its core characteristics: a lack of food encompassing the shortage of food, the unsuitability of both food and diet and a preoccupation with continuity in access to enough food; and a lack of control of households over their food situation; and (2) a related set of potential reactions: socio-familial perturbations, hunger and physical impairment, and psychological suffering. The results substantiate the existence of food insecurity among Québecers and confirm that the nature of this experience is consistent with many of the core components identified in upstate New York. This study underlines the monotony of the diet, describes the feeling of alienation, differentiates between a lack of food and the reactions that it engenders, and emphasizes the dynamic nature of the experience.
PubMed ID
11820676 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparability of household and individual food consumption data--evidence from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31647
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
W. Becker
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. wulf.becker@slv.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1177-82
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Data Collection - standards
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Eating
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Comparison of household and individual food consumption. DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS: Combined household and individual food consumption survey carried out in Sweden in 1989. A random sample of 3000 subjects aged 0-74 years, the household to which the subject belonged constituted the household unit. Each household recorded all the foods it purchased over a 4-week period, except food eaten outside the home. For the selected subject, excluding children
PubMed ID
11924944 View in PubMed
Less detail

Economic abuse and intra-household inequities in food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168387
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):258-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Elaine M Power
Author Affiliation
Health Studies Program, School of Physical and Health Education, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. power@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):258-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Nutritional Status
Poverty
Public Assistance
Public Health - economics
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - economics
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Food insecurity affected over 2.3 million Canadians in 2004. To date, the food security literature has not considered the potential impact of economic abuse on food security, but there are three ways in which these two important public health issues may be related: 1) victims of economic abuse are at risk of food insecurity when they are denied access to adequate financial resources; 2) the conditions that give rise to food insecurity may also precipitate intimate partner violence in all its forms; 3) women who leave economically abusive intimate heterosexual relationships are more likely to live in poverty and thus are at risk of food insecurity. This paper presents a case of one woman who, during a qualitative research interview, spontaneously reported economic abuse and heterosexual interpersonal violence. The economic abuse suffered by this participant appears to have affected her food security and that of her children, while her husband's was apparently unaffected. There is an urgent need to better understand the nature of intra-household food distribution in food-insecure households and the impact of economic abuse on its victims' food security. Such an understanding may lead to improved food security measurement tools and social policies to reduce food insecurity.
PubMed ID
16827421 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimation of age- and gender-specific food availability from household budget survey data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52284
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1149-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
V G Vasdeki
S. Stylianou
A. Naska
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics, Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece. vasdekis@aueb.gr
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2001 Oct;4(5B):1149-51
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Belgium
Budgets
Comparative Study
Databases, Factual
Diet Surveys
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Great Britain
Greece
Housekeeping - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Economic
Norway
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To derive estimates of age-gender specific food availability, based on data collected at household level. DESIGN: Two alternative modelling approaches are described leading to linear and non-linear optimisation, respectively. The idea of penalised least squares is used for estimation of model parameters. The effect of household characteristics can be incorporated into both modelling approaches. SETTING: Household budget survey data from four European countries (Belgium, Greece, Norway and the United Kingdom), circa 1990.
PubMed ID
11924939 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food insecurity in Canada: considerations for monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155340
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):324-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. sharon.kirkpatrick@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):324-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - economics
Health Policy
Humans
Hunger
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Poverty
Public Policy
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Food insecurity, which has been recognized as an important determinant of health, is estimated to have affected almost one in ten Canadian households in 2004. Analyses of indicators of household food insecurity on several recent population health surveys have shed light on markers of vulnerability and the public health implications of this problem. However, the lack of detailed information on the economic circumstances of households and inconsistent measurement across surveys thwart attempts to develop a deeper understanding of problems of food insecurity. To better inform the development and evaluation of policies to address food insecurity among Canadian households, more effective monitoring is needed. This requires the consistent administration of a well-validated measure of food security on a population survey that routinely collects detailed information on the economic circumstances of households. Health professionals can contribute to the amelioration of problems of food insecurity in Canada by advocating for improved monitoring of the problem at a population level.
PubMed ID
18767280 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food insecurity in Canadian adults receiving diabetes care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120898
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):e261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Suzanne Galesloot
Lynn McIntyre
Tanis Fenton
Sheila Tyminski
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Services, Population and Public Health, Calgary Zone, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):e261-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Ambulatory Care
Diabetes mellitus
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Abstract
The prevalence of adult-level household food insecurity was examined among clients receiving outpatient diabetes health care services.
Participants were adults diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, who attended individual counselling sessions at Calgary's main clinic from January to April 2010. Clinicians were trained to administer the Household Food Security Survey Module (HFSSM), and did so with clients' assent during their scheduled sessions.
The prevalence of adult-level household food insecurity among 314 respondents was 15.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.2 to 19.4); 6.7% (95% CI, 4.2 to 10.0) of clinic attendees were categorized as severely food insecure. The comparable rates obtained in Alberta in 2007 using the same instrument (HFSSM) were 5.6% and 1.2%, respectively.
Household food insecurity rates among individuals with diabetes in active care are higher than rates reported in Canadian population surveys. Severe food insecurity, indicating reduced food intake and disrupted eating patterns, may affect this population's ability to follow a pattern of healthy eating necessary for effective diabetes management. This study reinforces the importance of assessing clients' inability to access food because of financial constraints, and indicates that screening with a validated measure may facilitate identification of clients at risk.
PubMed ID
22958632 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food insecurity is associated with nutrient inadequacies among Canadian adults and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158692
Source
J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):604-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2. sharon.kirkpatrick@utoronto.ca
Source
J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):604-12
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Eating
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Infant
Male
Malnutrition
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Household food insecurity constrains food selection, but whether the dietary compromises associated with this problem heighten the risk of nutrient inadequacies is unclear. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between household food security status and adults' and children's dietary intakes and to estimate the prevalence of nutrient inadequacies among adults and children, differentiating by household food security status. We analyzed 24-h recall and household food security data for persons aged 1-70 y from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey (cycle 2.2). The relationship between adults' and children's nutrient and food intakes and household food security status was assessed using regression analysis. Estimates of the prevalence of inadequate nutrient intakes by food security status and age/sex group were calculated using probability assessment methods. Poorer dietary intakes were observed among adolescents and adults in food-insecure households and many of the differences by food security status persisted after accounting for potential confounders in multivariate analyses. Higher estimated prevalences of nutrient inadequacy were apparent among adolescents and adults in food-insecure households, with the differences most marked for protein, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, folate, vitamin B-12, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. Among children, few differences in dietary intakes by household food security status were apparent and there was little indication of nutrient inadequacy. This study indicates that for adults and, to some degree, adolescents, food insecurity is associated with inadequate nutrient intakes. These findings highlight the need for concerted public policy responses to ameliorate household food insecurity.
Notes
Erratum In: J Nutr. 2008 Jul;138(7):1399
PubMed ID
18287374 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 May-Jun;100(3):184-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Valerie Tarasuk
Janet Vogt
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2. valerie.tarasuk@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 May-Jun;100(3):184-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Income
Marital status
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Pensions
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To identify socio-demographic factors associated with household food insecurity in the Ontario population.
Using data from the Ontario Share File of the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, multivariate logistic regression was applied to identify the socio-demographic characteristics of households most likely to report food insecurity.
Of the estimated 379,100 food-insecure households in Ontario in 2004, 55% were reliant on salaries or wages, 23% on social assistance, and 13% on pensions or seniors' benefits. The prevalence of food insecurity increased markedly as income adequacy declined, rising to 47% in the lowest category of income adequacy. Food insecurity was also more prevalent among tenant households and single-person and single-parent households. When all socio-demographic factors were taken into account, three potent socio-demographic correlates of household food insecurity in Ontario were identified: low income adequacy, social assistance as the main source of income, and not owning one's dwelling. Compared to households whose main source of income was salary or wages, the adjusted odds of experiencing food insecurity was 3.69 (95% CI: 2.33, 5.84) for households reliant on social assistance, but 0.44 (95% CI: 0.29, 0.67) for those reliant on pensions or seniors' benefits.
Our findings highlight the need for more adequate social assistance benefit levels, but also point to the need for better income supports for low-waged workers in Ontario so that they have sufficient financial resources to purchase the food they need.
PubMed ID
19507719 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multiplex social ecological network analysis reveals how social changes affect community robustness more than resource depletion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290892
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 11 29; 113(48):13708-13713
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
11-29-2016
Author
Jacopo A Baggio
Shauna B BurnSilver
Alex Arenas
James S Magdanz
Gary P Kofinas
Manlio De Domenico
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Society, Utah State University Logan, UT 84322.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 11 29; 113(48):13708-13713
Date
11-29-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Ecosystem
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Social Change
Social Class
Social Environment
Abstract
Network analysis provides a powerful tool to analyze complex influences of social and ecological structures on community and household dynamics. Most network studies of social-ecological systems use simple, undirected, unweighted networks. We analyze multiplex, directed, and weighted networks of subsistence food flows collected in three small indigenous communities in Arctic Alaska potentially facing substantial economic and ecological changes. Our analysis of plausible future scenarios suggests that changes to social relations and key households have greater effects on community robustness than changes to specific wild food resources.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2010 May 14;328(5980):876-8 PMID 20466926
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Jul 21;9(7):e102806 PMID 25047714
Cites: Ambio. 2004 Aug;33(6):344-9 PMID 15387072
Cites: Hum Ecol Interdiscip J. 2015 Aug;43(4):515-30 PMID 26526638
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 10;111(23):8351-6 PMID 24912174
Cites: Nat Commun. 2015 Apr 23;6:6868 PMID 25904405
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2015 Sep 7;282(1814):null PMID 26336179
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Apr 1;111(13):4820-5 PMID 24639494
Cites: Nature. 2015 Nov 12;527(7577):173-4 PMID 26536113
Cites: Science. 2009 Feb 13;323(5916):892-5 PMID 19213908
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Jul 8;100(14):8074-9 PMID 12792023
PubMed ID
27856752 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perception of needs and responses in food security: divergence between households and stakeholders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155395
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Dec;11(12):1389-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Hamelin
Céline Mercier
Annie Bédard
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Pavillon Paul-Comtois, Université Laval, 2425 rue de l'Agriculture, Québec City, Canada G1V 0A6. anne-marie.hamelin@aln.ulaval.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Dec;11(12):1389-96
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Food - standards
Food Supply - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Perception
Poverty
Public Assistance
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was (i) to describe the needs of food-insecure households and their assessment of community programmes, as expressed by households and perceived by stakeholders; and (ii) to examine the similarities and differences between households' and stakeholders' perceptions in Quebec City area.
A semi-structured interview and sociodemographic questionnaire with fifty-five households and fifty-nine stakeholders (community workers, managers, donor agencies). The transcriptions were subjected to content analysis and inter-coder reliability measurement.
The respondents' perceptions converge towards three main categories of needs: needs specific to food security, conditions necessary for achieving food security and related needs. There was agreement on the necessity of better financial resources, although the impact of financial resources alone may be uncertain in the opinion of some stakeholders. Different perceptions of needs and of their fulfilment by community programmes emerge between both groups. Despite households found positive aspects, they complained that quality of food and access were major needs neglected. Their account suggests overall a partial fit between the programmes and food security needs; even a combination of programmes (e.g. collective kitchens, purchasing groups, community gardens) was insufficient to adequately meet these needs. In contrast, most stakeholders perceived that the household's primary need was a basic amount of food and that the households were satisfied with programmes.
It is urgent to evaluate the overall effect of community programmes on specific aspects of household food insecurity. The results emphasise that community programmes alone cannot bring about social change needed to prevent food insecurity.
PubMed ID
18761760 View in PubMed
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.