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Addressing Household Food Insecurity in Canada - Position Statement and Recommendations - Dietitians of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288319
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2016 09;77(3):159
Publication Type
Article
Date
09-2016
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2016 09;77(3):159
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Dietetics
Financing, Government
Food Supply - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Government Programs
Humans
Income
Mental health
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Status
Nutritionists
Socioeconomic Factors
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
POSITION STATEMENT It is the position of Dietitians of Canada that household food insecurity is a serious public health issue with profound effects on physical and mental health and social well-being. All households in Canada must have sufficient income for secure access to nutritious food after paying for other basic necessities. Given the alarming prevalence, severity and impact of household food insecurity in Canada, Dietitians of Canada calls for a pan-Canadian, government-led strategy to specifically reduce food insecurity at the household level, including policies that address the unique challenges of household food insecurity among Indigenous Peoples. Regular monitoring of the prevalence and severity of household food insecurity across all of Canada is required. Research must continue to address gaps in knowledge about household vulnerability to food insecurity and to evaluate the impact of policies developed to eliminate household food insecurity in Canada. Dietitians of Canada recommends: Development and implementation of a pan-Canadian government-led strategy that includes coordinated policies and programs, to ensure all households have consistent and sufficient income to be able to pay for basic needs, including food. Implementation of a federally-supported strategy to comprehensively address the additional and unique challenges related to household food insecurity among Indigenous Peoples, including assurance of food sovereignty, with access to lands and resources, for acquiring traditional/country foods, as well as improved access to more affordable and healthy store-bought/market foods in First Nation reserves and northern and remote communities. Commitment to mandatory, annual monitoring and reporting of the prevalence of marginal, moderate and severe household food insecurity in each province and territory across Canada, including among vulnerable populations, as well as regular evaluation of the impact of poverty reduction and protocols for screening within the health care system. Support for continued research to address gaps in knowledge about populations experiencing greater prevalence and severity of household food insecurity and to inform the implementation and evaluation of strategies and policies that will eliminate household food insecurity in Canada.
PubMed ID
27524631 View in PubMed
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Legislated changes to federal pension income in Canada will adversely affect low income seniors' health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107109
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):963-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
J C Herbert Emery
Valerie C Fleisch
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: hemery@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):963-6
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Federal Government
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Legislation as Topic - economics - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study uses a population health intervention modeling approach to project the impact of recent legislated increases in age eligibility for Canadian federally-funded pension benefits on low income seniors' health, using food insecurity as a health indicator.
Food insecurity prevalence and income source were assessed for unattached low income (
PubMed ID
24055151 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and sociodemographic risk factors related to household food security in Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153515
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Aug;12(8):1150-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Noreen D Willows
Paul Veugelers
Kim Raine
Stefan Kuhle
Author Affiliation
Alberta Institute of Human Nutrition, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Noreen.willows@ualberta.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Aug;12(8):1150-6
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - economics
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Malnutrition - economics - ethnology
Poverty - ethnology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Canada's Aboriginal population is vulnerable to food insecurity and increasingly lives off-reserve. The Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 Nutrition, was used to compare the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of food insecurity between non-Aboriginal and off-reserve Aboriginal households.
Food insecurity status was based on Health Canada's revised interpretation of responses to the US Household Food Security Survey Module. Logistic regression was used to assess if Aboriginal households were at higher risk for food insecurity than non-Aboriginal households, adjusting for household sociodemographic factors.
Canada.
Households (n 35,107), 1528 Aboriginal and 33 579 non-Aboriginal.
Thirty-three per cent of Aboriginal households were food insecure as compared with 9 % of non-Aboriginal households (univariate OR 5.2, 95 % CI 4.2, 6.3). Whereas 14 % of Aboriginal households had severe food insecurity, 3 % of non-Aboriginal households did. The prevalence of sociodemographic risk factors for household food insecurity was higher for Aboriginal households. Aboriginal households were more likely to have three or more children (14 % v. 5 %), be lone-parent households (2 1 % v. 5 %), not have home ownership (52 % v. 31 %), have educational attainment of secondary school or less (43 % v. 26 %), have income from sources other than wages or salaries (38 % v. 29 %), and be in the lowest income adequacy category (33 % v. 12 %). Adjusted for these sociodemographic factors, Aboriginal households retained a higher risk for food insecurity than non-Aboriginal households (OR 2.6, 95 % CI 2.1, 3.2).
Off-reserve Aboriginal households in Canada merit special attention for income security and poverty alleviation initiatives.
PubMed ID
19105863 View in PubMed
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