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A farmers' market in a food desert: Evaluating impacts on the price and availability of healthy food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149492
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1158-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Kristian Larsen
Jason Gilliland
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Department of Geography and Planning, St. George Campus, Sidney Smith Hall, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G3. kristian.larsen@utoronto.ca
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1158-62
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - economics
Cost Savings - methods - trends
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Marketing - economics - methods
Ontario
Urban health
Abstract
Several studies have examined supermarket access for low-income residents, but few have explored how access to healthy food changes when a new food retailer such as a farmers' market opens in a place previously known as a 'food desert'. This paper uses a 'before and after' approach to examine the impact of the introduction of a farmers' market on the price and availability of healthy food in an underserved urban neighbourhood. The farmers' market had a major impact on grocery prices in the neighbourhood, which decreased by almost 12% in 3 years.
PubMed ID
19631571 View in PubMed
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Mapping the evolution of 'food deserts' in a Canadian city: supermarket accessibility in London, Ontario, 1961-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157654
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Kristian Larsen
Jason Gilliland
Author Affiliation
The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5C2, Canada. klarsen2@uwo.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:16
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Cluster analysis
Food Industry - economics - trends
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Marketing - economics - trends
Ontario
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Transportation
Urban health
Abstract
A growing body of research suggests that the suburbanization of food retailers in North America and the United Kingdom in recent decades has contributed to the emergence of urban 'food deserts', or disadvantaged areas of cities with relatively poor access to healthy and affordable food. This paper explores the evolution of food deserts in a mid-sized Canadian city (London, Ontario) by using a geographic information system (GIS) to map the precise locations of supermarkets in 1961 and 2005; multiple techniques of network analysis were used to assess changing levels of supermarket access in relation to neighbourhood location, socioeconomic characteristics, and access to public transit.
The findings indicate that residents of inner-city neighbourhoods of low socioeconomic status have the poorest access to supermarkets. Furthermore, spatial inequalities in access to supermarkets have increased over time, particularly in the inner-city neighbourhoods of Central and East London, where distinct urban food deserts now exist.
Contrary to recent findings in larger Canadian cities, we conclude that urban food deserts exist in London, Ontario. Policies aimed at improving public health must also recognize the spatial, as well as socioeconomic, inequities with respect to access to healthy and affordable food. Additional research is necessary to better understand how supermarket access influences dietary behaviours and related health outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18423005 View in PubMed
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