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Spilt milk: an inter-sectoral partnership that failed to advance milk security for low-income lone mothers in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133269
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2011 Mar;18(1):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Lynn McIntyre
N Theresa Glanville
Andrea Hilchie-Pye
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, TRW 3E43-3280 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6, Canada. lmcintyr@ucalgary.ca
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2011 Mar;18(1):20-2
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Milk - economics
Mothers
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Policy - economics
Poverty
Public Health
Single Parent
Abstract
Canadian agricultural policy supports higher milk prices. Consequently, poor families lack sufficient funds to purchase adequate quantities of milk. Low-income lone mothers in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia suggested their preferred strategies for improved access to milk. We then built inter-sectoral support for a policy intervention to address their recommendations. Our research-to-action process led to a policy dialogue focusing on an electronic smart card that would permit the delivery of lower-priced milk to poor households. While all agreed that milk insecurity was an important issue, the project ultimately failed because of the entrenched positions of influential stakeholder groups.
PubMed ID
21721295 View in PubMed
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