Skip header and navigation

Refine By

71 records – page 1 of 8.

An application of the edge effect in measuring accessibility to multiple food retailer types in southwestern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134478
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2011;10:34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Richard C Sadler
Jason A Gilliland
Godwin Arku
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON, N6A 5C2, Canada.
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2011;10:34
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food - economics - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marketing - economics - statistics & numerical data
Nutrition Policy - economics
Ontario - epidemiology
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Trends in food retailing associated with the consolidation of smaller-format retailers into fewer, larger-format supercentres have left some rural areas with fewer sources of nutritious, affordable food. Access to nutritious, affordable food is essential for good dietary habits and combating health issues such as type-2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Many studies on food environments use inaccurate or incomplete methods for locating food retailers, which may be responsible for mischaracterising food deserts. This study uses databases of every residence in and every food retailer in and around Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada. Residences were geocoded to their precise address, and network analysis techniques were performed in a geographic information system (GIS) to determine distances between every residence and different types of food retailers (grocery stores, fast food, fruit and vegetable sources, grocery stores plus fruit and vegetable sources, variety stores), both when considering and neglecting facilities outside the area of study, to account for a deficiency in analysis termed the 'edge effect'.
Analysis of household accessibility to food outlets by neighbourhood socioeconomic distress level indicated that residents in the most distressed neighbourhoods tended to have better accessibility to all types of food retailers. In the most distressed neighbourhoods, 79 percent of residences were within walking distance of a grocery store, compared to only 10 percent in the least distressed neighbourhoods. When the edge effect was neglected, 37 percent of distance estimates proved inaccurate. Average accessibility to all food retailer types improved dramatically when food outlets adjacent to the study area were considered, thereby controlling for the edge effect.
By neglecting to consider food retailers just outside study area boundaries, previous studies may significantly over-report the actual distance necessary to travel for food. Research on food access spanning large rural regions requires methods that accurately geocode residents and their food sources. By implementing methods akin to those in this paper, future research will be better able to identify areas with poor food accessibility. Improving identification of food desert communities is a first step in facilitating more effective deployment of food policies and programs in those communities.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):55-915682698
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1998 Jun;46(12):1519-299672392
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Feb;96(2):325-3116380567
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2006 May;30(5):365-7016627123
Cites: Health Place. 2006 Dec;12(4):741-816253542
Cites: Health Promot J Austr. 2006 Dec;17(3):240-617176241
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:417295912
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:3717367533
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2007 May;32(5):375-8217478262
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Jun;61(6):491-817496257
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Nov;107(11):1916-2317964311
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12):1481-917582241
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Mar;62(3):198-20118272733
Cites: J Nutr. 2008 Mar;138(3):620-718287376
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jun;66(11):2218-2918313824
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:1618423005
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):491-519022700
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Feb;63(2):113-2018801797
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2009 Apr;36(4 Suppl):S151-519285206
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2009 May-Jun;41(3):176-8719411051
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1158-6219631571
Cites: Chronic Dis Can. 2009;29(4):178-9119804682
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;39(1):277-8419491142
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2010;9:4020663199
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Aug;24(8):1032-910951543
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-3211820676
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Jul;18(7):568-7512848840
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2004 Dec;7(8):1081-815548347
Cites: Health Place. 2010 Nov;16(6):1124-820691630
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Dec;59(12):1035-4016286490
PubMed ID
21575162 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reconciling traditional knowledge, food security, and climate change: experience from Old Crow, YT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104280
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Vasiliki Douglas
Hing Man Chan
Sonia Wesche
Cindy Dickson
Norma Kassi
Lorraine Netro
Megan Williams
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2014;8(1):21-7
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Culture
Focus Groups
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preservation - economics - methods
Food Storage - economics - methods
Food Supply - economics - methods
Gardening - education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Nutritional Sciences - education
Transportation - economics - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Because of a lack of transportation infrastructure, Old Crow has the highest food costs and greatest reliance on traditional food species for sustenance of any community in Canada's Yukon Territory. Environmental, cultural, and economic change are driving increased perception of food insecurity in Old Crow.
To address community concerns regarding food security and supply in Old Crow and develop adaptation strategies to ameliorate their impact on the community.
A community adaptation workshop was held on October 13, 2009, in which representatives of different stakeholders in the community discussed a variety of food security issues facing Old Crow and how they could be dealt with. Workshop data were analyzed using keyword, subject, and narrative analysis techniques to determine community priorities in food security and adaptation.
Community concern is high and favored adaptation options include agriculture, improved food storage, and conservation through increased traditional education. These results were presented to the community for review and revision, after which the Vuntut Gwitchin Government will integrate them into its ongoing adaptation planning measures.
PubMed ID
24859099 View in PubMed
Less detail

Socio-demographic influences on food purchasing among Canadian households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171135
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;60(6):778-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
L. Ricciuto
V. Tarasuk
A. Yatchew
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. laurie.ricciuto@utoronto.ca
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;60(6):778-90
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Dairy Products
Demography
Diet - economics - standards
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
To characterize the relationships between selected socio-demographic factors and food selection among Canadian households.
A secondary analysis of data from the 1996 Family Food Expenditure survey was conducted (n=10,924). Household food purchases were classified into one of the five food groups from Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating. Parametric and non-parametric modelling techniques were employed to analyse the effects of household size, composition, income and education on the proportion of income spent on each food group and the quantity purchased from each food group.
Household size, composition, income and education together explained 21-29% of the variation in food purchasing. Households with older adults spent a greater share of their income on vegetables and fruit (P
PubMed ID
16418741 View in PubMed
Less detail

The health benefits of selective taxation as an economic instrument in relation to IHD and nutrition-related cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116425
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Dec;16(12):2124-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Astrid L Holm
Mai-Britt Laursen
Maria Koch
Jørgen D Jensen
Finn Diderichsen
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Public Health, Section of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Dec;16(12):2124-31
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cost of Illness
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects - economics - standards
Dietary Fats
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Neoplasms - etiology
Nutrition Policy - economics
Risk factors
Taxes
Vegetables
Abstract
The present study aimed to estimate the health benefits of selective taxation of healthy and unhealthy food commodities in relation to CVD and nutrition-related cancers.
The potential health effects of a selective taxation scenario were estimated as changes in the burden of disease, measured by disability-adjusted life years, from health outcomes affected by the changes in food intake. The change in burden of a disease was calculated as the change in incidence of the disease due to a modified exposure level, using the potential impact fraction. Estimates of relative risk for the associations between various foods and relevant diseases were found through a literature search and used in the calculation of potential impact fractions.
The study was based in Denmark, estimating the health effects of a Danish selective taxation scenario.
The potential health effects of selective taxation were modelled for the adult Danish population.
Halving the rate of value-added tax on fruit and vegetables and increasing the tax on fats would result in moderate reductions in the burden of disease from IHD, ischaemic stroke, and colorectal, lung and breast cancer (0·4–2·4 % change). The largest effect could be obtained through increased intake of fruit and vegetables (0·9–2·4 %).
Applying selective taxation to healthy and unhealthy foods can moderately reduce the burden of disease in the Danish population.
PubMed ID
23399106 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Hygienic estimation a state of nutrition of infant and preschool children age of city of Murmansk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175838
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2004;73(5):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
S V Dmitrievskaia
A V Istomin
A A Korolev
L A Lukicheva
E I Nikitenko
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2004;73(5):6-10
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Food Supply - economics - standards
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - economics - standards
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nutrition Policy - economics
Nutrition Surveys
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The present research was directed on study of an actual meal and status of nutrition of children in the age of from birth till 5 years living in Murmansk (region of Far North). 998 children were surveyed. At an estimation of an actual meal of children the data about breast feeding are received, the basic nutrients misbalance of structure of diets of children are established, and their reasons are analyzed. On the basis of the received data the regional recommendations for organization of a healthy meal in children's preschool establishments and program of hygienic training of the parents to skills of a balanced diet of children of early and junior age were developed.
PubMed ID
15754479 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adequacy of food spending is related to housing expenditures among lower-income Canadian households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161594
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12):1464-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, FitzGerald Building Room 326, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3E2.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12):1464-73
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Housing - economics
Humans
Income
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty
Abstract
A number of studies have pointed to the pressure that housing costs can exert on the resources available for food. The objectives of the present study were to characterise the relationship between the proportion of income absorbed by housing and the adequacy of household food expenditures across the Canadian population and within income quintiles; and to elucidate the impact of receipt of a housing subsidy on adequacy of food expenditures among low-income tenant households.
The 2001 Survey of Household Spending, conducted by Statistics Canada, was a national cross-sectional survey that collected detailed information on expenditures on goods and services. The adequacy of food spending was assessed in relation to the cost of a basic nutritious diet.
Canada.
The person with primary responsibility for financial maintenance from 15 535 households from all provinces and territories.
As the proportion of income allocated to housing increased, food spending adequacy declined significantly among households in the three lowest income quintiles. After accounting for household income and composition, receipt of a housing subsidy was associated with an improvement in adequacy of food spending among low-income tenant households, but still mean food spending fell below the cost of a basic nutritious diet even among subsidised households.
This study indicates that housing costs compromise the food access of some low-income households and speaks to the need to re-examine policies related to housing affordability and income adequacy.
PubMed ID
17764603 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of economic changes on the diet of Chukotka Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4754
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Andrew Kozlov
Author Affiliation
ArctAn-C Innovative Laboratory and International Independent University of Ecological and Political Sciences, Moscow, Russia. aikozlov@narod.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-42
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Diet - economics - trends
Energy intake
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Income
Russia
Abstract
This paper describes and analyses changes in food composition and nutritional preferences among the Chukchi and Yupik of coastal Chukotka in the last 15 years. The economic collapse of the infrastructure of Chukotka region has resulted in many indigenous northerners reverting to the traditional subsistence economy. Relatively expensive market foods are being replaced by cheaper ones, and by more readily available local foods. Percent contribution of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates to total caloric intake has not changed substantially, but sources of the major nutrients have become different. In 1985, local marine mammals accounted for about half of the consumed meat (55%), while in 2000 the share of it increased to 89 %. Market fats and oils are also being substituted by the fat of marine mammals. However, the contemporary diet of the natives of coastal Chukotka differs significantly from the traditional one. The meat of seals and gray whales (small sized and less dangerous to harvest) remains seasonally accessible, but can not be stored for long times. There is an insufficient amount of walrus and bowhead whale meat, which can be prepared in traditional style by fermentation, and stored for a long time. This probably also provides a specific protection against Helicobacter pylori. The young people today are more oriented towards local food-stuff: 76 % Coastal Chukchee and Yupik under the age of 30 indicated a preference for native foods over European ("Russian") ones, while this share is lower (66 %) among people older than 30 years. Overall, 86 % of natives consider that whale hunting, as the main source of food, should be increased (in 1985, only 45% suggested so).
PubMed ID
15526927 View in PubMed
Less detail

Legislated changes to federal pension income in Canada will adversely affect low income seniors' health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107109
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):963-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
J C Herbert Emery
Valerie C Fleisch
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: hemery@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):963-6
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Federal Government
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Legislation as Topic - economics - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study uses a population health intervention modeling approach to project the impact of recent legislated increases in age eligibility for Canadian federally-funded pension benefits on low income seniors' health, using food insecurity as a health indicator.
Food insecurity prevalence and income source were assessed for unattached low income (
PubMed ID
24055151 View in PubMed
Less detail

Historical warnings of future food insecurity with unprecedented seasonal heat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95460
Source
Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):240-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-2009
Author
Battisti David S
Naylor Rosamond L
Author Affiliation
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1640, USA. battisti@washington.edu
Source
Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):240-4
Date
Jan-9-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa South of the Sahara
Agriculture - trends
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Climate
Commerce
Crops, Agricultural - economics - growth & development
Droughts
Extreme Heat
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics
Forecasting
France
Greenhouse Effect
Hot Temperature
Humans
Seasons
Tropical Climate
Ukraine
Abstract
Higher growing season temperatures can have dramatic impacts on agricultural productivity, farm incomes, and food security. We used observational data and output from 23 global climate models to show a high probability (>90%) that growing season temperatures in the tropics and subtropics by the end of the 21st century will exceed the most extreme seasonal temperatures recorded from 1900 to 2006. In temperate regions, the hottest seasons on record will represent the future norm in many locations. We used historical examples to illustrate the magnitude of damage to food systems caused by extreme seasonal heat and show that these short-run events could become long-term trends without sufficient investments in adaptation.
Notes
Comment In: Science. 2009 Apr 10;324(5924):177-9; author reply 177-919359565
Comment In: Science. 2009 Jan 9;323(5911):19319131598
PubMed ID
19131626 View in PubMed
Less detail

71 records – page 1 of 8.