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Effects of the Danish saturated fat tax on the demand for meat and dairy products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291091
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Dec; 19(17):3085-3094
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Jørgen Dejgaard Jensen
Sinne Smed
Lars Aarup
Erhard Nielsen
Author Affiliation
1Department of Food and Resource Economics,University of Copenhagen,Rolighedsvej 25,DK-1958 Frederiksberg C,Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Dec; 19(17):3085-3094
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Dairy Products - economics
Denmark
Fatty acids
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Meat - economics
Taxes
Abstract
Taxation of unhealthy food is considered a regulation tool to improve diets. In 2011 Denmark introduced a tax on saturated fat in food products, the first country in the world to do so. The objective of the present paper is to investigate the effects of the tax on consumers' intake of saturated fat within three different types of food product group: minced beef, regular cream and sour cream.
We use an augmented version of the Linearized Almost Ideal Demand System (LAIDS) functional form for econometric analysis, allowing for tax-induced structural breaks.
Data originate from one of the largest retail chains in Denmark (Coop Danmark) and cover January 2010 to October 2012, with monthly records of sales volume, sales revenue and information about specific campaigns from 1293 stores.
The Danish fat tax had an insignificant or small negative effect on the price for low- and medium-fat varieties, and led to a 13-16 % price increase for high-fat varieties of minced beef and cream products. The tax induced substitution effects, budget effects and preference change effects on consumption, yielding a total decrease of 4-6 % in the intake of saturated fat from minced beef and regular cream, and a negligible effect on the intake from sour cream.
The Danish introduction of a tax on saturated fat in food in October 2011 had statistically significant effects on the sales of fat in minced beef and cream products, but the tax seems to have reduced the beyond-recommendation saturated fat intake to only a limited extent.
PubMed ID
26306542 View in PubMed
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An ethicist's commentary on promoting farm animal welfare at the expense of productivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134039
Source
Can Vet J. 2011 Mar;52(3):230
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011

[Implementation of State Policy in healthy nutrition of the population of the Russian Federation on the regional level: building-up regional policy and programs. Methodical aspects of development and implementation. Part 2. Recommendations were made development and realization of regional policy and programs in the healthy nutrition of the population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174546
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2005;74(2):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
V A Tutel'ian
B P Sukhanov
A V Vasil'ev
M G Kerimova
V B Spirichev
L N Shatniuk
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2005;74(2):3-8
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Supply - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Policy - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Russia
Abstract
Recommendations were made development and realization of regional policy and programs in the healthy nutrition of the population.
PubMed ID
15921197 View in PubMed
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The case of Montréal's missing food deserts: evaluation of accessibility to food supermarkets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165206
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Philippe Apparicio
Marie-Soleil Cloutier
Richard Shearmur
Author Affiliation
Spatial Analysis and Regional Economics Laboratory, Institut national de la recherche scientifique--Urbanisation, Culture et Société, Montréal, Québec, Canada. philippe_apparicio@ucs.inrs.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:4
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Cluster analysis
Food Industry - economics
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Poverty
Quebec
Socioeconomic Factors
Topography, Medical
Abstract
Access to varied, healthy and inexpensive foods is an important public health concern that has been widely documented. Consequently, there is an increasing interest in identifying food deserts, that is, socially deprived areas within cities that have poor access to food retailers. In this paper we propose a methodology based on three measures of accessibility to supermarkets calculated using geographic information systems (GIS), and on exploratory multivariate statistical analysis (hierarchical cluster analysis), which we use to identify food deserts in Montréal.
First, the use of three measures of accessibility to supermarkets is very helpful in identifying food deserts according to several dimensions: proximity (distance to the nearest supermarket), diversity (number of supermarkets within a distance of less than 1000 metres) and variety in terms of food and prices (average distance to the three closest different chain-name supermarkets). Next, the cluster analysis applied to the three measures of accessibility to supermarkets and to a social deprivation index demonstrates that there are very few problematic food deserts in Montréal. In fact, census tracts classified as socially deprived and with low accessibility to supermarkets are, on average, 816 metres away from the nearest supermarket and within 1.34 kilometres of three different chain-name supermarkets.
We conclude that food deserts do not represent a major problem in Montréal. Since geographic accessibility to healthy food is not a major issue in Montréal, prevention efforts should be directed toward the understanding of other mechanisms leading to an unhealthy diet, rather than attempting to promote an even spatial distribution of supermarkets.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17295912 View in PubMed
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A farmers' market in a food desert: Evaluating impacts on the price and availability of healthy food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149492
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1158-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Kristian Larsen
Jason Gilliland
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Department of Geography and Planning, St. George Campus, Sidney Smith Hall, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G3. kristian.larsen@utoronto.ca
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1158-62
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - economics
Cost Savings - methods - trends
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Marketing - economics - methods
Ontario
Urban health
Abstract
Several studies have examined supermarket access for low-income residents, but few have explored how access to healthy food changes when a new food retailer such as a farmers' market opens in a place previously known as a 'food desert'. This paper uses a 'before and after' approach to examine the impact of the introduction of a farmers' market on the price and availability of healthy food in an underserved urban neighbourhood. The farmers' market had a major impact on grocery prices in the neighbourhood, which decreased by almost 12% in 3 years.
PubMed ID
19631571 View in PubMed
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Impact of economic changes on the diet of Chukotka Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4754
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Andrew Kozlov
Author Affiliation
ArctAn-C Innovative Laboratory and International Independent University of Ecological and Political Sciences, Moscow, Russia. aikozlov@narod.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-42
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Diet - economics - trends
Energy intake
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Income
Russia
Abstract
This paper describes and analyses changes in food composition and nutritional preferences among the Chukchi and Yupik of coastal Chukotka in the last 15 years. The economic collapse of the infrastructure of Chukotka region has resulted in many indigenous northerners reverting to the traditional subsistence economy. Relatively expensive market foods are being replaced by cheaper ones, and by more readily available local foods. Percent contribution of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates to total caloric intake has not changed substantially, but sources of the major nutrients have become different. In 1985, local marine mammals accounted for about half of the consumed meat (55%), while in 2000 the share of it increased to 89 %. Market fats and oils are also being substituted by the fat of marine mammals. However, the contemporary diet of the natives of coastal Chukotka differs significantly from the traditional one. The meat of seals and gray whales (small sized and less dangerous to harvest) remains seasonally accessible, but can not be stored for long times. There is an insufficient amount of walrus and bowhead whale meat, which can be prepared in traditional style by fermentation, and stored for a long time. This probably also provides a specific protection against Helicobacter pylori. The young people today are more oriented towards local food-stuff: 76 % Coastal Chukchee and Yupik under the age of 30 indicated a preference for native foods over European ("Russian") ones, while this share is lower (66 %) among people older than 30 years. Overall, 86 % of natives consider that whale hunting, as the main source of food, should be increased (in 1985, only 45% suggested so).
PubMed ID
15526927 View in PubMed
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Spilt milk: an inter-sectoral partnership that failed to advance milk security for low-income lone mothers in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133269
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2011 Mar;18(1):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Lynn McIntyre
N Theresa Glanville
Andrea Hilchie-Pye
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, TRW 3E43-3280 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6, Canada. lmcintyr@ucalgary.ca
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2011 Mar;18(1):20-2
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Milk - economics
Mothers
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Policy - economics
Poverty
Public Health
Single Parent
Abstract
Canadian agricultural policy supports higher milk prices. Consequently, poor families lack sufficient funds to purchase adequate quantities of milk. Low-income lone mothers in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia suggested their preferred strategies for improved access to milk. We then built inter-sectoral support for a policy intervention to address their recommendations. Our research-to-action process led to a policy dialogue focusing on an electronic smart card that would permit the delivery of lower-priced milk to poor households. While all agreed that milk insecurity was an important issue, the project ultimately failed because of the entrenched positions of influential stakeholder groups.
PubMed ID
21721295 View in PubMed
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Multiplex social ecological network analysis reveals how social changes affect community robustness more than resource depletion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290892
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 11 29; 113(48):13708-13713
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
11-29-2016
Author
Jacopo A Baggio
Shauna B BurnSilver
Alex Arenas
James S Magdanz
Gary P Kofinas
Manlio De Domenico
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Society, Utah State University Logan, UT 84322.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 11 29; 113(48):13708-13713
Date
11-29-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Ecosystem
Family Characteristics
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Social Change
Social Class
Social Environment
Abstract
Network analysis provides a powerful tool to analyze complex influences of social and ecological structures on community and household dynamics. Most network studies of social-ecological systems use simple, undirected, unweighted networks. We analyze multiplex, directed, and weighted networks of subsistence food flows collected in three small indigenous communities in Arctic Alaska potentially facing substantial economic and ecological changes. Our analysis of plausible future scenarios suggests that changes to social relations and key households have greater effects on community robustness than changes to specific wild food resources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27856752 View in PubMed
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Charitable food programs in Victoria, BC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145042
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):46-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Elietha M Bocskei
Aleck S Ostry
Author Affiliation
Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-based Program with Vancouver Island Health Authority and the Salvation Army Addictions and Rehabilitation Centre, Victoria, BC.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(1):46-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Charities - organization & administration
Dairy Products
Food Services - economics
Food Supply - economics
Homeless Persons
Humans
Meat
Nutrition Surveys - methods
Poverty
Abstract
Few authors have investigated the institutional character of charitable food programs and their capacity to address food security in Canada.
We surveyed food program managers at charitable agencies in Greater Victoria, British Columbia. We discuss the structure of the "system" of charitable food provision, the value of sourced food, types of services provided, clients' demographic profile, and the estimated healthfulness of meals served. We also describe the proportion of major food types purchased and donated to agencies.
Thirty-six agencies served approximately 20,000 meals a week to about 17,000 people. Food valued at $3.2 million was purchased or donated; approximately 50% was donated, mainly by corporations. The largest value of food purchased and donated was from meat and alternatives (40.9%) and nonperishable food items (16%). Dairy products made up the smallest share of donated foods.
Charitable food programs in Victoria depend on food donations. The proportion of dairy products and produce is low, which raises questions about the healthfulness of foods currently fed to homeless and poor people in the city.
PubMed ID
20205978 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.