Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

Assessing the impact of pilot school snack programs on milk and alternatives intake in 2 remote First Nation communities in northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117132
Source
J Sch Health. 2013 Feb;83(2):69-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Michelle Gates
Rhona M Hanning
Allison Gates
Daniel D McCarthy
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
University of Waterloo, School of Public Health and Health Systems, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada. m2gates@uwaterloo.ca
Source
J Sch Health. 2013 Feb;83(2):69-76
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Eating
Female
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Milk
Nutrition Assessment
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Rural Population
Saskatchewan
School Health Services - organization & administration
Snacks
Time Factors
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Abstract
Canadian Aboriginal youth have poorer diet quality and higher rates of overweight and obesity than the general population. This research aimed to assess the impact of simple food provision programs on the intakes of milk and alternatives among youth in Kashechewan and Attawapiskat First Nations (FNs), Ontario, Canada.
A pilot school snack program was initiated in Kashechewan in May 2009 including coordinator training and grant writing support. A supplementary milk and alternatives program was initiated in Attawapiskat in February 2010. Changes in dietary intake were assessed using Web-based 24-hour dietary recalls in grade 6 to 8 students, pre- and 1-week post-program, with a 1-year follow-up in Kashechewan. Student impressions were collected after 1 week using open-ended questions in the Web survey. Teacher and administrator impressions were collected via focus groups after 1 year in Kashechewan.
After 1 week, calcium intake increased in Kashechewan (805.9 ± 552.0 to 1027.6 ± 603.7 mg, p = .044); however, improvements were not sustained at 1 year; milk and alternatives (1.7 ± 1.7 servings to 2.1 ± 1.4 servings, p = .034) and vitamin D (2.5 ± 2.6 to 3.5 ± 3.4 µg, p = .022) intakes increased in Attawapiskat. Impressions of the programs were positive, though limited resources, staff, facilities, and funding were barriers to sustaining the consistent snack provision of the 1-week pilot phase.
These illustrations show the potential of snack programs to address the low intakes of milk and alternatives among youth in remote FNs. Community-level constraints must be addressed for sustained program benefits.
PubMed ID
23331265 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can food banks sustain nutrient requirements? A case study in Southwestern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165323
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jennifer D Irwin
Victor K Ng
Timothy J Rush
Cuong Nguyen
Meizi He
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON. jenirwin@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):17-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Food Services - organization & administration - standards
Food Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritive Value
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Public Assistance - organization & administration
Social Welfare
Abstract
Concerns about adequate food supply is a mounting problem in Canada, making food bank visits a necessity for over 820,000 Canadians. Given this reliance, the purpose of this study was to compare contents of food hampers with Canadian guidelines, at a large urban food bank in Southwestern Ontario that intends to provide 3 days worth of food per person.
Thirty hampers of each available size (for 1-6 people) were sampled (N = 180). Food items were recorded and analyzed for caloric value, food group, and macro- and micro-nutrient values. Results were compared to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) and Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating.
99% of hampers did not provide 3 days worth of nutrients. Grains and cereals met the lower range of Canada's Food Guide recommendations, and fruits and vegetables, meats and alternatives, and dairy products were below recommended levels, as were numerous vitamins and minerals, including vitamins A, D, B12, C, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, magnesium and zinc. Carbohydrates were slightly above recommended DRI, and energy from fat and protein scarcely met the minimums recommended. Hampers contained 1.6 days worth of energy per person.
The energy available per person was below recommendations for most Canadians. Nutrients missing from the hampers can come from fresh fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and meats and alternatives. However, many low-income families have limited finances to purchase these foods which are relatively more expensive than processed foods. Encouraging more perishable food donations and storage facilities to maximize the nutritional intake for clients is imperative.
PubMed ID
17278671 View in PubMed
Less detail

Charitable food assistance as symbolic gesture: an ethnographic study of food banks in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186432
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1505-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Valerie Tarasuk
Joan M Eakin
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, 150 College Street, Ont., M5S 3E2, Toronto, Canada. valerie.tarasuk@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1505-15
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Charities - organization & administration
Eligibility Determination
Food Services - organization & administration - utilization
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Organizational Policy
Public Assistance - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Urban Population
Volunteers
Abstract
Community-based charitable food assistance programs have recently been established in several affluent nations to distribute public and corporate food donations to 'the needy'. In Canada, food banks comprise the primary response to hunger and food insecurity, but problems of unmet food need persist. We conducted an ethnographic study of food bank work in southern Ontario to examine the functioning of these extra-governmental, charitable food assistance programs in relation to problems of unmet need. Our results suggest that the limited, variable and largely uncontrollable supply of food donations shaped the ways in which food assistance was defined and the practices that governed its distribution. Workers framed the food assistance as a supplement or form of acute hunger relief, but generally acknowledged that the food given was insufficient to fully meet the needs of those who sought assistance. In response to supply limitations, workers restricted both the frequency with which individual clients could receive assistance and the amount and selection of food that they received on any one occasion. Food giving was essentially a symbolic gesture, with the distribution of food assistance dissociated from clients' needs and unmet needs rendered invisible. We conclude that, structurally, food banks lack the capacity to respond to the food needs of those who seek assistance. Moreover, the invisibility of unmet need in food banks provides little impetus for either community groups or government to seek solutions to this problem.
PubMed ID
12614701 View in PubMed
Less detail

Charitable food assistance: what are food bank users receiving?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199484
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90(6):382-4
Publication Type
Article

Children's feeding programs in Atlantic Canada: reducing or reproducing inequities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201557
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):196-200
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. McIntyre
K. Travers
J B Dayle
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Professions, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Lynn.McIntyre@dal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):196-200
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Focus Groups
Food Services - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Humans
New Brunswick
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Stereotyping
Abstract
This study analyzed, through case studies of day-to-day observations and interviews with recipients and operators, the operations of nine children's feeding programs in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland. We found that children's feeding programs result in the stigmatization of participants and families, despite an ideology of equality. Most programs adopt a family substitution role in the lives of children they serve and function in a way that excludes parental participation. Programs also transmit a hidden curriculum to children that teaches them how to behave and how a 'proper' family functions. We found that the professionalization of food and nutrition, a desire for an expanded client base, and dependency creation through the provision of other material goods, permit programs to exert increasing institutional control over recipients, a process we, following Illich, call the dragnet. While these programs may be meeting some nutritional needs in a few poverty-stricken children, they ultimately reproduce, rather than reduce, inequities.
PubMed ID
10401172 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's feeding programs in Atlantic Canada: some Foucauldian theoretical concepts in action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185237
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jul;57(2):313-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Jutta B Dayle
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3C3. jutta.dayle@dal.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jul;57(2):313-25
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Female
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Hunger
Male
Models, organizational
Poverty
Power (Psychology)
Program Development
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration
Abstract
Since 1989 the number of Canadian children depending on food banks has increased by more than 85%. To combat perceived hunger, breakfast and lunch programs have been initiated by localized volunteer efforts. This paper attempts to show the Foucauldian concepts of power, truths, space and time in action in feeding programs in Atlantic Canada. A potential 'relation of docility-utility' is imposed upon children by providers of feeding programs and ultimately the state. The 'power over life' or 'micro-physics of power' is accomplished through procedures that use food, rules, rewards, reinforcements, space, time, and truths. Children voluntarily subject themselves to this relation while reserving the power to resist through acts of defiance or by not attending at all. This ability to exercise one's agency allows for shifting power relations in the social dynamics of feeding programs. The potentially coercive nature of these relationships is embedded in the pleasurable environment generated by the feeding process.
PubMed ID
12765711 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Comprehensive hygienic evaluation of nutritional status in adolescents in the European North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218099
Source
Gig Sanit. 1994 Jun;(6):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
A V Istomin
L A Rumiantseva
Source
Gig Sanit. 1994 Jun;(6):29-31
Date
Jun-1994
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Energy intake
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Hygiene
Nutritional Status
Physical Fitness
Russia
Vocational Education
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
Energy expenditures, real nutrition, intellectual and physical capacity for work, vitamin sufficiency and morbidity of pupils at professional technical schools of Republic of Komi were studied. Hygienic recommendations on improvement of pupils' nutrition were developed.
PubMed ID
7982616 View in PubMed
Less detail

Creating partnership with the food industry in the Stockholm cancer prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24274
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1992 Dec;20(4):240-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
L. Kanström
L E Holm
B J Haglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Prevention, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1992 Dec;20(4):240-6
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Books
Cookery
Food Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To facilitate the supply of healthful foods in institutional kitchens and restaurants, the Stockholm Cancer Prevention Program (SCPP) produced a cookbook in collaboration with the food industry and the SCPP. Fifty different organizations participated in this work. The development of the cookbook was made in several steps and started with a recipe contest to engage chefs and employees in restaurants and institutional kitchens. Criteria for the recipes were that they should present low-fat/high-fiber meals. Complementary recipes were received from the food industry. All recipes were tested in 20 restaurants and institutional kitchens and 11,000 lunch guests assessed the palatability of the dishes. The cookbook was presented in conjunction with a food fair in 1989 and has until now been sold in about 4,000 copies. Production of a cookbook can thus be a focal point for involving food industry, restaurants and institutional kitchens in a community intervention program aiming at a change of dietary habits.
PubMed ID
1475652 View in PubMed
Less detail

The dragnet of children's feeding programs in Atlantic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196304
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Dec;51(12):1783-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
J B Dayle
L. McIntyre
K D Raine-Travers
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Saint Mary's University, Halifiax, Nova Scotia, Canada. jutta.dayle@dal.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2000 Dec;51(12):1783-93
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Food Services - organization & administration
Humans
Hunger
Poverty
Abstract
Ivan Illich's 1976 prediction that medical dragnets will continue was correct. Now quasi-health dragnets are being established ostensibly to feed children perceived to be hungry. Our qualitative, multi-site case study found that programs justify their expansion to non-target group children as a means of reducing stigmatization, while reaching only an estimated one-third of targeted children. The dragnet continues as new services are added and franchising is proposed while the purpose of the program feeding healthy foods to children ultimately succumbs to drives for efficiency and the desire to maintain the program itself. In this field of social power relations, children become commodified through dialectical interplays among fundamental needs, manipulated needs, benevolence, and domination.
PubMed ID
11128266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a collective kitchens program: using the Population Health Promotion Model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179482
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(2):72-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Tara J Fano
Sheila M Tyminski
Mary A T Flynn
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Nutrition and Active Living, Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(2):72-80
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Food Services - organization & administration - utilization
Health Promotion - organization & administration - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of the Calgary Health Region Collective Kitchen Program on various Population Health Promotion Model health determinants, data were collected through mail-in questionnaires that examined the members' (n=331) and coordinators' (n=58) perspectives of the program. Seventy-nine members (24%) and 26 coordinators (45%) were included in the study. Three incomplete questionnaires (from prenatal program members) were discarded. Sixty-one percent of members who reported income level and family size (n=61) had incomes below the low-income cut-off. Fifty-eight members (73%) reported improvements in their lives because of the program. Sixty-four members (81%) perceived they learned to feed their families healthier foods. The members reported their fruit and vegetable consumption before and since joining a collective kitchen, and the proportion of those consuming at least five fruit and vegetable servings a day rose from 29% to 47%. The most common reasons for joining this program concerned social interactions and support. Over 90% of the coordinators perceived that they were competent to coordinate a kitchen. The results indicate that the collective kitchens program addresses several health determinants, and may increase members' capacity to attain food security and to achieve improved nutritional health.
PubMed ID
15217525 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.