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[7 out of 10 satisfied with hospital food--is better, but not good enough].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143873
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Mar 31-Apr 13;107(13-14):926; discussion 926-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maria Wallhager
Catharina Elmsäter-Svärd
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Mar 31-Apr 13;107(13-14):926; discussion 926-7
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food - standards
Food Handling - standards
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Humans
Patient satisfaction
Sweden
PubMed ID
20432872 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A survey of hospital diet. Connection between the nutritive value found by analysis and by calculation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62087
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Apr 11;156(15):2245-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-1994
Author
K O Lassen
Author Affiliation
Miljø- og levnedsmiddelkontrollen, Odense.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Apr 11;156(15):2245-7
Date
Apr-11-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
English Abstract
Food analysis
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritive Value
Abstract
The primary aim of this study is to determine the nutritional quality of the food prepared in a selected Danish hospital. Samples consisted of four double portions of the hospital's standard daily ration from two randomly chosen weeks. The amounts of fatty acid, protein, ash, total dry material, and vitamin C were measured. The amount of carbohydrate, energy, and percentage of available energy were calculated. The total energy level was measured to eight MJ per day. The measured percentage of available energy given as protein (17%) and the vitamin C levels (14 mg/MJ) have fulfilled the recommendations. The percentage of energy given as carbohydrates (38%) is below and the percentage of energy given as fat (45%) is above the recommended levels (50% and 32%). There is a direct correlation between the average calculated and the average measured values when all of the meals are analysed as an entity, but the correlation is weak for individual meals.
PubMed ID
8016953 View in PubMed
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Auditing dietetic services in a psychiatric facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244357
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 Jul;58(7):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1980 Jul;57(7):23-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1980
Author
C. Tougas
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1980 Jul;57(7):23-4
Date
Jul-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Services - standards
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Humans
Nutritional Sciences - education
Quality Control
Quebec
PubMed ID
7399184 View in PubMed
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Determining the complexity of patient satisfaction with foodservices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218441
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1994 Apr;94(4):394-8, 401; quiz 399-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
L. Dubé
E. Trudeau
M C Bélanger
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Department, School of Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1994 Apr;94(4):394-8, 401; quiz 399-400
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Female
Food Service, Hospital - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Urban - standards
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Menu Planning - standards
Middle Aged
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
(a) To identify the psychological dimensions representing how patients perceive the quality of foodservice; (b) to identify which dimensions best explain variation in the satisfaction ratings of patients; and (c) to identify subgroups based on individual characteristics of patients and contextual factors.
Survey questionnaire.
Patients of a specialized acute-care urban hospital in Canada.
One hundred thirty-two hospitalized patients (minimum stay of 5 days) who had not received nutrition counseling. Subjects excluded from the study were patients with notable physical, cognitive, or emotional limitations; patients receiving enteral or parenteral nutrition; and patients from long-term-care units.
Overall satisfaction with meals and with foodservices, and satisfaction with 26 specific foodservice attributes.
Factor analysis followed by orthogonal rotation (varimax), stepwise multiple regression analysis, and one-way analysis of variance.
Seven dimensions represented patients' perceptions of foodservice: food quality, service timeliness, service reliability, food temperature, attitude of the staff who deliver menus, attitude of the staff who serve meals, and customization. Food quality was the best predictor of patient satisfaction with meals and foodservice, followed by customization and attitude of the staff who deliver menus. Individual characteristics (gender, age, education, perception of degree of control over health, and belief that food influences one's health status) and contextual factors (normal or therapeutic diet, time spent at rest, and appetite) influenced patient satisfaction.
The results emphasize the need for a comprehensive and differentiated approach in measuring and monitoring patient satisfaction with foodservices.
PubMed ID
8144806 View in PubMed
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[Diet and physical activity in Norwegian psychiatric institutions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49568
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2005
Author
Maria Hjort Thommessen
Egil W Martinsen
Gunn Helene Arsky
Author Affiliation
NutriCom AS, Grefsenveien 49, Postboks 37 Grefsen, 0409 Oslo. maria@nutricom.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3297-9
Date
Dec-1-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
English Abstract
Exercise
Female
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity - chemically induced - etiology - prevention & control
Overweight - drug effects
Patient Education
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects
Weight Gain - drug effects
Abstract
The food served in psychiatric institutions may in general be described as a standard diet similar to that served in somatic hospitals, with no or little adjustment made to the special needs of the individual psychiatric patient. The emphasis on physical activity is also generally low. This paper presents results and strategies in a sample of sixteen Norwegian psychiatric institutions that have undertaken a one-year weight management programme with focus on structural changes in dietary and physical activity practices. Prevention and treatment of weight gain in psychiatric patients is difficult, but not impossible. All institutions included in this project have made changes in the dietary practice and the routines for physical activity, with less severe weight problems in the patients as a result. Coordinated approaches are necessary if the efforts are to succeed.
PubMed ID
16327859 View in PubMed
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Do recommendations for institutional food service result in better food service? A study of compliance in Danish hospitals and nursing homes from 1995 to 2002-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81471
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;61(1):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Mikkelsen B E
Beck A M
Lassen A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Soeborg, Denmark. bem@dfvf.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;61(1):129-34
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Energy intake
Food - standards
Food analysis
Food Preferences
Food Service, Hospital - standards - trends
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Menu Planning - standards - trends
Nursing Homes - standards
Nutrition Physiology
Nutritional Status
Nutritive Value
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since 1995, significant efforts by authorities and researchers have been directed towards addressing the nutritional problems in Danish hospitals and nursing homes. AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the increased focus on nutritional problems in patients and nursing home residents has resulted in measurable progress. DESIGN: A questionnaire-based study was carried out among foodservice managers in Danish hospitals (n=96) and nursing homes (n=898) in 1995 and 2002/3 (n=90) and (n=682), respectively. The study used compliance with selected issues in the official Danish recommendations for institutional food service as an indicator for progress. The issues included: using nutrient calculated recipes/menus, offering menu choice options, using feedback routines on acceptability of menus, maintaining nutritional steering committees, employing food and nutrition contact persons, employing official recommendations and offering choice between three different menu energy levels. RESULTS: Hospitals had a higher compliance compared to nursing homes. In 1995, this was the case for all questions asked and differences were statistically significant. Also in 2002/3, hospitals had a higher compliance, except in the case of established feedback routines. Differences were statistically significant. The results indicate that nutritional care is higher on the agenda in hospital, than in nursing homes. However, very little progress can be seen in compliance when results are analysed over the 8-year period. The only progress for nursing homes was that more homes had implemented feedback routines on acceptability of food service in 2002/3 than in 1995. The difference was statistically significant. For hospitals, however, no progress was found between 1995 and 2002/3. CONCLUSION: The attempts to improve the nutritional status of hospital patients and nursing home residents seem to have failed. Still, the initiatives taken to improve the situation seem relevant. Especially the nursing homes might benefit from advantage of these experiences.
PubMed ID
16835596 View in PubMed
Less detail

The emotional experience of hospitalization: its moderators and its role in patient satisfaction with foodservices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212339
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Apr;96(4):354-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
M C Bélanger
L. Dubé
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier St-Georges de Beauce, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Apr;96(4):354-60
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Arousal
Emotions
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Health status
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Quebec
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Concept
Abstract
To investigate the basic dimensions of patient emotional experience of hospitalization; to identify the moderators of emotional experience in terms of individual characteristics and contextual factors; and to investigate the contribution of the dimensions of the patient emotional experience to satisfaction with foodservices.
Survey questionnaire.
One hundred two hospitalized patients of a specialized, acute-care, urban hospital in Canada who required one or more overnight stays. Patients with notable physical, cognitive, or emotional limitations were excluded from the study. Patients admitted to the obstetrics department were also excluded because of the unique nature of their emotional experience of hospitalization.
Factor analysis followed by orthogonal rotation (varimax), analyses of variance, and multiple regression analyses.
Five dimensions represented the emotional experience of hospitalization: positive emotions, arousal emotions, and three negative dimensions structured on the basis of their possible causes (situation-, other-, or self-attributed negative emotions). Individual characteristics (gender, age, marital status, perceived health status) and contextual factors (perceived control over the situation, complexity of medical diagnosis, and admission procedures) significantly influenced patient emotions. Satisfaction with foodservices was structured in technical and interpersonal dimensions; the largest part of the common variance was accounted for by interpersonal aspects. The relationship between emotions and satisfaction was direct for positive emotions and, surprisingly, for situation-attributed negative emotions and self-attributed negative emotions. Other-attributed negative emotions and arousal emotions were negatively associated with satisfaction with foodservices.
Results suggest that dietitians' interventions should be adapted for subgroups of patients who experience different emotions. Results also provide insights on individual and contextual factors that can be used to identify or better understand the specific characteristics of these subgroups. The pattern of relationships between emotions and satisfaction demonstrates that the fine-tuning of dietitians' interventions as a function of patients' emotional states may be conducive to increased patient satisfaction with foodservices.
PubMed ID
8598436 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Energy and protein intake of patients at the Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Landspítali - the National University Hospital of Iceland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115621
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Feb;99(2):71-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Dagny �sp Vilhjálmsdottir
Harpa Hrund Hinriksdóttir
Frida Run Pórdardottir
Inga Pórsdottir
Ingibjörg Gunnarsdtótir
Author Affiliation
Rannsóknastofu í Nseringarfrnedi vid Háskóla og Landspítala, Spítala.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Feb;99(2):71-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - standards
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - standards
Energy intake
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Guideline Adherence
Hospital Departments - standards
Hospitals, University - standards
Humans
Iceland
Inpatients
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Nutritional Support
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Protein-Energy Malnutrition - etiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Thoracic Surgical Procedures - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim was to estimate energy and protein intake of patients at the Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Landspítali the National University Hospital of Iceland. Another aim was also to assess their nutritional status.
The energy and protein content of meals served by the hospital's kitchen is known. Starting at least 48 hours after surgery, all left over food and drinks were weighed and recorded for three consecutive days. Energy and protein requirements were estimated according to clinical guidelines for hospital nutrition at Landspítali (25-30 kcal/kg/day and 1.2-1.5 g/kg/day, respectively). Nutritional status was estimated using a validated seven question screening sheet.
Results are presented for 61 patients. The average energy intake was 19±5.8 kcal/kg/day. Protein intake was on average 0.9±0.3 g/kg/day. Most patients (>80%) had an energy and protein intake below the lower limit of estimated energy and protein needs, even on the fifth day after sugery. According to the nutritional assessment 14 patients (23%) were defined as either malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. This group was closer than the well-nourished group to meeting their estimated energy- and protein needs. The use of nutrition drinks was more common among malnourished patients and those at risk of malnutrition than the well-nourished patients.
The results suggest that the energy and protein intake of patients is below estimated requirements, even on the fifth day after surgery. Attention must be paid to malnutrition and nutrition in general in the hospital wards.
Notes
Comment In: Laeknabladid. 2013 Feb;99(2):6923486678
PubMed ID
23486676 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Feeding All Tongues Project: developing tools for our growing multicultural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189802
Source
Hosp Q. 2001-2002 Winter;5(2):39-41
Publication Type
Article

29 records – page 1 of 3.