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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Convenience food use in eight hospitals in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245159
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1981 Jan;42(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1981
Author
E M Upton
P D Glencross
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1981 Jan;42(1):39-46
Date
Jan-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Efficiency
Food Preservation
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Frozen Foods
Humans
Ontario
Abstract
A ten point Conventional Convenience Rating Scale (CCRS) was developed to classify and analyze differences in use of convenience food for menu items of selective regular and diabetic diets for seven days in eight active treatment hospitals. Statistical analysis showed that the CCRS score detected differences between six meal components, three meals and four areas of production within each diet type. The convenience hospital had generally highest CCRS scores for all meal components; dessert CCRS scores were primarily dependent on the presence or absence of a bakeshop on the premises. Breakfast had the highest mean meal CCRS scores and lunch the lowest. CCRS scores were lowest for menu items which were prepared in the chef's area and in the salad and sandwich area. There was a significant inverse relationship (r = 0.895) between mean hospital CCRS score and aggregate skill level of food production employees. No correlation was found between the mean hospital CCRS score and 1) meal-days per food production labour minute, 2) total food cost per meal-day and 3) food production labour cost per meal-day. Among other recommendations, this research suggests that further investigation be made to assess the adequacy of the standards of performance used in this study and commonly used as indicators of institutional foodservice efficiency.
PubMed ID
10309348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost analysis of the Kozak protocol as used in an Ontario hospital in the treatment of children with epidermolysis bullosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240709
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Mar 15;130(6):715-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1984
Author
H B Wodinsky
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Mar 15;130(6):715-7
Date
Mar-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Direct Service Costs
Epidermolysis Bullosa - economics - therapy
Female
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Germany, West
Humans
Infant
Male
Nursing Staff, Hospital - economics
Ontario
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - economics
Abstract
Conventional treatment of epidermolysis bullosa is often unsuccessful. The Kozak protocol is an alternative that has been given considerable public support in Ontario. The incremental cost of this treatment program at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, was examined. The departments of nursing, pharmacy and food services each kept records of salaries and supply costs applicable to the care of nine patients with epidermolysis bullosa who were treated in the fiscal year 1982-83. The selected direct costs to the hospital were compared with the projected costs if these patients had been treated in Dr. Kozak's clinic in West Germany or under the financial arrangements offered to Dr. Kozak by the Ontario minister of health. At a total incremental cost of +255.92 per patient-day, care at the Hospital for Sick Children may not currently be the least expensive means of offering the Kozak protocol to Ontario children. However, the major expense of the program, the nurses' salaries, could be reduced if the patients' parents were to assume many of the nursing tasks; this would make the hospital's program the most cost-effective method of treating children with epidermolysis bullosa.
Notes
Cites: Mod Probl Paediatr. 1975;17:77-841186692
PubMed ID
6697279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost-effectiveness in healthcare: complexity of the equation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231393
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1988;49(2):80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
A. Archambault
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1988;49(2):80-5
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis - methods
Decision Making
Dietary Services - economics
Efficiency
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Humans
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Quality of Life
Abstract
Integrating scientific changes, citizens' needs and economic constraints has become a challenge. New types of cost-effective services, technologies and products must be found. Manufacturers, hospital administrators and health professionals must be capable of effectively documenting the benefits, risks and costs of their services to society and the quality of care to patients. Choices must be made to decide upon appropriate actions in allocating and using resources. The concepts of cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis should be understood. Identifying and valuing costs and benefits, measuring effectiveness, and assessing quality of life are complex and difficult issues. They are discussed in reference to Canadian studies on the cost-effectiveness of nutrition support. The need for further research to improve cost-effectiveness of nutrition support is stressed.
PubMed ID
10312528 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fulfilling patients' nutritional requirements cost-effectively.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231395
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1988;49(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
L M Brylowski
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1988;49(2):116-20
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Dietary Services - economics
Enteral Nutrition - economics
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Formularies, Hospital
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Ontario
Abstract
Fulfilling nutrition support cost-effectively encompasses consideration of the selection of appropriate patients, routes, products and equipment. Properly administered, nutrition support not only benefits the patient but undoubtedly provides a cost-saving to the institution. Data based on product specifications and nutrition needs should be considered in the selection of nutrition products. Standardization of a skeleton solution that can be modified for individual patient needs minimizes associated labour, contains costs and encourages appropriate patient monitoring. The co-ordination of nutrition care by a nutrition support service has been associated with reduced complication rates, improved nutrition therapy and major cost savings.
PubMed ID
10312526 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improving financial comparisons among dietary departments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244359
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 Jul;58(7):12-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Author
E. Clemence
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 Jul;58(7):12-3
Date
Jul-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Financial Management
Financial Management, Hospital
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Humans
Ontario
PubMed ID
7286464 View in PubMed
Less detail

Innovations in healthcare food services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202044
Source
Hosp Q. 1997;1(1):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P. Gauntley
Author Affiliation
Versa Healthcare Services, Canada.
Source
Hosp Q. 1997;1(1):4-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost Savings
Food Service, Hospital - economics - organization & administration
Hospital Costs
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Outsourced Services
PubMed ID
10345278 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Nutritional support to patients with nutritional problems--to what price?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62202
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jan 23;88(4):209-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-23-1991
Author
L. Tibbling
J. Lundgren
E. Edholm
J. Wersäll
Author Affiliation
Oronkliniken, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jan 23;88(4):209-10
Date
Jan-23-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Services - economics
Energy intake
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Humans
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Disorders - diet therapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
1994158 View in PubMed
Less detail

The problems and challenges facing food service administrators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252324
Source
Hosp Adm Can. 1975 May;17(5):54, 56-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1975

14 records – page 1 of 2.