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69 records – page 1 of 7.

[About flavouring substances and flavouring preparations regulation in the field of manufacturing of flavourings and foodstuffs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112655
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
O V Bagriantseva
G N Shatrov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Flavoring Agents - pharmacology - standards
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Food Safety
Humans
Russia
Abstract
In article are given substantiation for modification of contemporary list of biologically active substances with undesirable toxicological qualities (namely included in this list of menthofuran, methyleugenol (4-Allyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene), teucrin A, capsaicin, estragol1 (-Allyl-4-methoxybenzene) and excluded from the list of quinine, santonin, berberin) and developing the list of plants--natural sources of flavourings substances. The new criteria of European Union for including into the relevant for using in/on foodstuff list of flavouring substances, which was published in the Comission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 872/2012 concerning flavourings, listed the 11 flavouring substances for which have been established indexes of foodstuffs in manufacturing, which there are could using and criteria of their safety (caffeine, theobromine, neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, rebaudioside A, d-camphor, three quinine salts (FL 14.011, FL 14.152 and FL 14.155), glycyrrhizic acid and its ammoniated form, ammonium chloride, discussed the possibility of using R- and S-isomers of flavouring substances and L- and D-forms of aminoacids for preparing of flavours, are discussed. Improving of the system of safety using of flavourings in Russian Federation, harmonized with demands of European Union and FAQ/WHO, are, at first, connected with the necessity of reevaluation of the list flavouring substances, which could be use in/on foodstuff, developing of list of the plants--natural sources of flavourings substances and preparations and regulations of using flavourings preparations which can include biologically active substances.
PubMed ID
23808275 View in PubMed
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Animal-free paralytic shellfish toxin testing--the Canadian perspective to improved health protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104308
Source
J AOAC Int. 2014 Mar-Apr;97(2):334-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wade A Rourke
Cory J Murphy
Source
J AOAC Int. 2014 Mar-Apr;97(2):334-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Testing Alternatives - methods
Animals
Biological Assay
Canada
Food Analysis - methods
Food Safety - methods
Humans
Marine Toxins - chemistry
Mice
Shellfish - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The performance characteristics of AOAC Official Method 2011.02 (the PCOX method) as a replacement for the AOAC mouse bioassay procedure have been well defined by validation studies, but these data do not communicate the complete story. The context provided by analyzing 9000 regulatory monitoring samples over 3 years demonstrates not only the reduction in animal use but also the increase in food safety that has been realized using a chemistry-based method. Detection of lower toxin levels provided early warning to enable directed sampling as toxin levels increased. The toxin profile information generated by a chemistry-based method was used to detect potential interferences qualitatively and can be used to assess the impact of changes recommended to monitoring programs. Such changes might include which toxins should be included in an action limit or the toxic equivalence factors used for these toxins.
PubMed ID
24830144 View in PubMed
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Application of hazard analysis and critical control point methodology and risk-based grading to consumer food safety surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121022
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Sep;75(9):1673-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Elin Halbach Røssvoll
Øydis Ueland
Therese Hagtvedt
Eivind Jacobsen
Randi Lavik
Solveig Langsrud
Author Affiliation
Nofima, Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research, Ås, Norway.
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Sep;75(9):1673-90
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety
Decision Trees
Food - standards
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - standards
Food Microbiology
Food Safety
Humans
Norway
Risk assessment
Safety Management - standards
Abstract
Traditionally, consumer food safety survey responses have been classified as either "right" or "wrong" and food handling practices that are associated with high risk of infection have been treated in the same way as practices with lower risks. In this study, a risk-based method for consumer food safety surveys has been developed, and HACCP (hazard analysis and critical control point) methodology was used for selecting relevant questions. We conducted a nationally representative Web-based survey (n = 2,008), and to fit the self-reported answers we adjusted a risk-based grading system originally developed for observational studies. The results of the survey were analyzed both with the traditional "right" and "wrong" classification and with the risk-based grading system. The results using the two methods were very different. Only 5 of the 10 most frequent food handling violations were among the 10 practices associated with the highest risk. These 10 practices dealt with different aspects of heat treatment (lacking or insufficient), whereas the majority of the most frequent violations involved storing food at room temperature for too long. Use of the risk-based grading system for survey responses gave a more realistic picture of risks associated with domestic food handling practices. The method highlighted important violations and minor errors, which are performed by most people and are not associated with significant risk. Surveys built on a HACCP-based approach with risk-based grading will contribute to a better understanding of domestic food handling practices and will be of great value for targeted information and educational activities.
PubMed ID
22947476 View in PubMed
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Application of laws, policies, and guidance from the United States and Canada to the regulation of food and feed derived from genetically modified crops: interpretation of composition data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108631
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 4;61(35):8349-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2013
Author
William D Price
Lynne Underhill
Author Affiliation
12818 Wolfsville Road, Smithsburg, Maryland 21783, United States.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 4;61(35):8349-55
Date
Sep-4-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Canada
Food Analysis - methods
Food Safety - methods
Food, Genetically Modified
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Plants, Genetically Modified - chemistry
Risk assessment
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
With the development of recombinant DNA techniques for genetically modifying plants to exhibit beneficial traits, laws and regulations were adopted to ensure the safety of food and feed derived from such plants. This paper focuses on the regulation of genetically modified (GM) plants in Canada and the United States, with emphasis on the results of the compositional analysis routinely utilized as an indicator of possible unintended effects resulting from genetic modification. This work discusses the mandate of Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency as well as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approach to regulating food and feed derived from GM plants. This work also addresses how publications by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and Codex Alimentarius fit, particularly with defining the importance and purpose of compositional analysis. The importance of study design, selection of comparators, use of literature, and commercial variety reference values is also discussed.
PubMed ID
23865444 View in PubMed
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Application of Molecular Typing Results in Source Attribution Models: The Case of Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) of Salmonella Isolates Obtained from Integrated Surveillance in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278946
Source
Risk Anal. 2016 Mar;36(3):571-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Leonardo V de Knegt
Sara M Pires
Charlotta Löfström
Gitte Sørensen
Karl Pedersen
Mia Torpdahl
Eva M Nielsen
Tine Hald
Source
Risk Anal. 2016 Mar;36(3):571-88
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Artifacts
Bacteriophage Typing
Chickens
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks
Ducks
Food Safety
Humans
Meat
Minisatellite Repeats
Models, Statistical
Multilocus Sequence Typing - methods
Salmonella Food Poisoning - diagnosis - microbiology
Salmonella Infections
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
Swine
Turkeys
Abstract
Salmonella is an important cause of bacterial foodborne infections in Denmark. To identify the main animal-food sources of human salmonellosis, risk managers have relied on a routine application of a microbial subtyping-based source attribution model since 1995. In 2013, multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) substituted phage typing as the subtyping method for surveillance of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium isolated from animals, food, and humans in Denmark. The purpose of this study was to develop a modeling approach applying a combination of serovars, MLVA types, and antibiotic resistance profiles for the Salmonella source attribution, and assess the utility of the results for the food safety decisionmakers. Full and simplified MLVA schemes from surveillance data were tested, and model fit and consistency of results were assessed using statistical measures. We conclude that loci schemes STTR5/STTR10/STTR3 for S. Typhimurium and SE9/SE5/SE2/SE1/SE3 for S. Enteritidis can be used in microbial subtyping-based source attribution models. Based on the results, we discuss that an adjustment of the discriminatory level of the subtyping method applied often will be required to fit the purpose of the study and the available data. The issues discussed are also considered highly relevant when applying, e.g., extended multi-locus sequence typing or next-generation sequencing techniques.
PubMed ID
27002674 View in PubMed
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Bacterial quality and safety of packaged fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281743
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Sep 02;232:73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-02-2016
Author
L-L Nousiainen
S. Joutsen
J. Lunden
M-L Hänninen
M. Fredriksson-Ahomaa
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Sep 02;232:73-9
Date
Sep-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Finland
Food Labeling
Food Microbiology
Food Quality
Food Safety
Foodborne Diseases - microbiology - prevention & control
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Oxygen
Plant Leaves - microbiology
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Vegetables - microbiology
Yersinia - isolation & purification
Abstract
Consumption of packaged fresh leafy vegetables, which are convenient ready-to-eat products, has increased during the last decade. The number of foodborne outbreaks associated with these products has concurrently increased. In our study, (1) label information, (2) O2/CO2 composition, (3) bacterial quality and (4) safety of 100 fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level were studied in Finland during 2013. Bacterial quality was studied using aerobic bacteria (AB) and coliform bacteria (CB) counts, and searching for the presence of Escherichia coli, Listeria and Yersinia. The safety was studied by the presence of Salmonella, ail-positive Yersinia, stx-positive E. coli (STEC) and Listeria monocytogenes using PCR and culturing. Important label information was unavailable on several packages originating from different companies. The packaging date was missing on all packages and the date of durability on 83% of the packages. Storage temperature was declared on 62% of the packages and 73% of the packages contained information about prewashing. The batch/lot number was missing on 29% of the packages. Very low oxygen (O2) (
PubMed ID
27257744 View in PubMed
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Bill S-11-Safe Food for Canadians Act.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119490
Source
Health Law Can. 2012 Aug;33(1):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Lewis Retik
Author Affiliation
Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP, Ottawa.
Source
Health Law Can. 2012 Aug;33(1):4-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Safety
Humans
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
23097925 View in PubMed
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Bulletin No. 16 April 3, 1997 April is Food Safety Awareness Month

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87826
Date
1997
  1 website  
Date
1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Keywords
food safety awareness month, food safety,
Abstract
Foodborne illness is preventable. Attention to proper foodhandling and foodhandler hygiene is critical.
Notes
Includes a table of selected foodborne outbreaks in Alaska, 1987-1996
Online Resources
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Bulletin No. 21 June 17, 1993 Summer Food Safety Tips

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87828
Date
1993
  1 website  
Date
1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Keywords
Salmonella, E.coli, food safety tips,
Abstract
Foodborne illness caused by E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella can be avoided by following a few simple precautions. These measures are especially important during the summer months when many Alaskans enjoy picnics, barbecues, and camping trips.
Online Resources
Less detail

[Catering for client groups during the XXII Olympic winter games and XI Paralympic winter games of 2014 in Sochi].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273988
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016;85(1):125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
A Yu Popova
A S Gus'kov
G E Ivanov
L V Chikina
V P Klindukhov
P N Nikolaevich
T V Grechanaya
M I Balaeva
L S Vechernyaya
E A Vechernyaya
I I Bozhko
V V Parkhomenko
O A Kulichenko
O V Tushina
E A Manin
T V Taran
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016;85(1):125-32
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Food Safety
Food Supply - history
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Russia
Sports - history
Abstract
The problems of catering control various client groups during the XXII Olympic Winter Games and XI Paralympic Winter Games of 2014 in Sochi is one of the priorities of the sanitary and epidemiological welfare of the population during mass events. The data on the order of nutrition of guests and participants of the games, control of food items, sanitary and microbiological monitoring of drinking water, food raw materials and products are presented. It is noted that the ongoing supervisory activities contributed to the sanitary and epidemiological well-being during the Games. The purpose of this study was to lighting modern achievements in the field of nutrition and food microbiology in the period of the Olympic Games and the determination of their value to the further improvement and use at when conducting mass gatherings.
PubMed ID
27228711 View in PubMed
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69 records – page 1 of 7.