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"Is it still safe to eat traditional food?" Addressing traditional food safety concerns in aboriginal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290906
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Sep 15; 565:529-538
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-15-2016
Author
Serge Bordeleau
Hugo Asselin
Marc J Mazerolle
Louis Imbeau
Author Affiliation
Chaire de Recherche du Canada en Foresterie Autochtone, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boul. de l'Université, Rouyn-Noranda, Québec J9X 5E4, Canada; Chaire Industrielle CRSNG-UQAT-UQÀM en Aménagement Forestier Durable, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, 445 boul. de l'Université, Rouyn-Noranda, Québec J9X 5E4, Canada. Electronic address: Serge.Bordeleau@uqat.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Sep 15; 565:529-538
Date
Sep-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Culture
Food Safety
Food Supply
Hares
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points
Liver - chemistry
Meat
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Nutritive Value
Quebec
Risk assessment
Abstract
Food insecurity is a growing concern for indigenous communities worldwide. While the risk of heavy metal contamination associated to wild food consumption has been extensively studied in the Arctic, data are scarce for the Boreal zone. This study addressed the concerns over possible heavy metal exposure through consumption of traditional food in four Anishnaabeg communities living in the Eastern North American boreal forest. Liver and meat samples were obtained from 196 snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) trapped during winter 2012 across the traditional lands of the participating communities and within 56-156km of a copper smelter. Interviews were conducted with 78 household heads to assess traditional food habits, focusing on snowshoe hare consumption. Concentrations in most meat and liver samples were below the detection limit for As, Co, Cr, Ni and Pb. Very few meat samples had detectable Cd and Hg concentrations, but liver samples had mean dry weight concentrations of 3.79mg/kg and 0.15mg/kg respectively. Distance and orientation from the smelter did not explain the variability between samples, but percent deciduous and mixed forest cover had a marginal negative effect on liver Cd, Cu and Zn concentrations. The estimated exposition risk from snowshoe hare consumption was low, although heavy consumers could slightly exceed recommended Hg doses. In accordance with the holistic perspective commonly adopted by indigenous people, the nutritional and sociocultural importance of traditional food must be considered in risk assessment. Traditional food plays a significant role in reducing and preventing serious health issues disproportionately affecting First Nations, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.
PubMed ID
27196990 View in PubMed
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Tracking sources of Clostridium botulinum type E contamination in seal meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292479
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1380994
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Daniel Leclair
Jeffrey M Farber
Franco Pagotto
Sandy Suppa
Bill Doidge
John W Austin
Author Affiliation
a Bureau of Microbial Hazards , Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada , Ottawa , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1380994
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Arctic Regions
Clostridium botulinum type E - isolation & purification
Female
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Food Safety - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat - microbiology
Middle Aged
Quebec
Seals, Earless
Seawater - microbiology
Skin - microbiology
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Botulism in Nunavik, Quebec is associated with the consumption of aged marine mammal meat and fat. The objective was to identify meat handling practices presenting a risk of contamination of seal meat with C. botulinum. Potential sources of contamination were assessed through interviews with igunaq producers from five communities of Nunavik. These sources were verified by detection and isolation of C. botulinum from igunaq prepared in the field from seal carcasses. Interviews indicated practices presenting a risk for contamination included: placing meat or fat on coastal rocks, using seawater for rinsing, and ageing meat in inverted seal skin pouches. Although the presence of C. botulinum type E spores was detected in only two of 32 (6.3%) meat or fat samples collected during the butchering process, two of four igunaq preparations from these samples contained type E botulinum toxin. Analysis of C. botulinum type E isolates recovered from these preparations indicated that shoreline soil may be a source of contamination. Seal meat and fat may be contaminated with C. botulinum type E during the butchering process. Measures can be adopted to reduce the risks of contamination in the field and possibly decrease the incidence of type E botulism in Nunavik.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28982302 View in PubMed
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CMAJ 2011 election survey: food safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134777
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E511-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2011
Author
Roger Collier
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E511-2
Date
Jun-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Food Safety
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Politics
PubMed ID
21543310 View in PubMed
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Animal-free paralytic shellfish toxin testing--the Canadian perspective to improved health protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104308
Source
J AOAC Int. 2014 Mar-Apr;97(2):334-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wade A Rourke
Cory J Murphy
Source
J AOAC Int. 2014 Mar-Apr;97(2):334-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Testing Alternatives - methods
Animals
Biological Assay
Canada
Food Analysis - methods
Food Safety - methods
Humans
Marine Toxins - chemistry
Mice
Shellfish - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The performance characteristics of AOAC Official Method 2011.02 (the PCOX method) as a replacement for the AOAC mouse bioassay procedure have been well defined by validation studies, but these data do not communicate the complete story. The context provided by analyzing 9000 regulatory monitoring samples over 3 years demonstrates not only the reduction in animal use but also the increase in food safety that has been realized using a chemistry-based method. Detection of lower toxin levels provided early warning to enable directed sampling as toxin levels increased. The toxin profile information generated by a chemistry-based method was used to detect potential interferences qualitatively and can be used to assess the impact of changes recommended to monitoring programs. Such changes might include which toxins should be included in an action limit or the toxic equivalence factors used for these toxins.
PubMed ID
24830144 View in PubMed
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[THE USE OF RISK INDICES IN PROCEDURES OF VERIFICATION OF BABY FOOD QUALITY CONFORMANCE].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273970
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(3):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
S A Buymova
A G Bubnov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016;95(3):281-6
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Food Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Food Safety - methods
Foods, Specialized - analysis - standards
Humans
Nutritive Value - physiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
There is considered the possibility of the use of risk indices with regard to their use in certification and validation of conformity assessment and food conformance, including those recommended for children. There were investigated samples of oatmeals, potted meats, liver pate, fruit-vegetable puree. The calculation of risk values was based on original data of quantitative analysis that was performed with the use of thermogravimetric, photometric, titrimetric, and potentiometric methods, as well as methods of gas-liquid chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. On the base of data of the chemical analysis of the ingredients of a set of food products, including assigned for baby nutrition, all the tested samples were shown to meet the requirements for the controlled regulatory standards on control indices of quality. The calculation of average daily doses of the intake of metal compounds (Cu, Zn, Fe, Na, Ca, Mg) consumed by adult and child's organisms through tested food showed that such doses are allowable since they do not exceed maximum daily dose and average daily requirements. However, some samples were referred to the category of high risk food, because the used method of individual's lifetime risk calculation takes into consideration all possible negative effects (carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, embryogenic, etc) of the impact of pollutants on the human body. It is shown that in addition to the sanitary and hygienic criteria of food quality, the risks of such food consumption should be taken into consideration by the Technical Regulations and other normative documentations.
PubMed ID
27266030 View in PubMed
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[Catering for client groups during the XXII Olympic winter games and XI Paralympic winter games of 2014 in Sochi].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273988
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016;85(1):125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
A Yu Popova
A S Gus'kov
G E Ivanov
L V Chikina
V P Klindukhov
P N Nikolaevich
T V Grechanaya
M I Balaeva
L S Vechernyaya
E A Vechernyaya
I I Bozhko
V V Parkhomenko
O A Kulichenko
O V Tushina
E A Manin
T V Taran
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016;85(1):125-32
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Food Safety
Food Supply - history
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Russia
Sports - history
Abstract
The problems of catering control various client groups during the XXII Olympic Winter Games and XI Paralympic Winter Games of 2014 in Sochi is one of the priorities of the sanitary and epidemiological welfare of the population during mass events. The data on the order of nutrition of guests and participants of the games, control of food items, sanitary and microbiological monitoring of drinking water, food raw materials and products are presented. It is noted that the ongoing supervisory activities contributed to the sanitary and epidemiological well-being during the Games. The purpose of this study was to lighting modern achievements in the field of nutrition and food microbiology in the period of the Olympic Games and the determination of their value to the further improvement and use at when conducting mass gatherings.
PubMed ID
27228711 View in PubMed
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Description of extended pre-harvest pig Salmonella surveillance-and-control programme and its estimated effect on food safety related to pork.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99993
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:6-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
L. Alban
K. Barfod
J V Petersen
J. Dahl
J C Ajufo
G. Sandø
H H Krog
S. Aabo
Author Affiliation
The Danish Agricultural & Food Council, Copenhagen, Denmark. lia@lf.dk
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Nov;57 Suppl 1:6-15
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Safety
Humans
Incidence
Meat
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Zoonoses
Abstract
Salmonella in pork can be combated during pre- or post-harvest. For large slaughterhouses, post-harvest measures like decontamination might be cost-effective while this is less likely with small-to-medium sized slaughterhouses. In this study, pre-harvest measures might be more relevant. We describe an extended surveillance-and-control programme for Salmonella in finisher pigs, which, to establish equivalence to the Swedish control programme, is intended for implementation on the Danish island, Bornholm. The effect of the programme on food safety was estimated by analysing Salmonella data from pig carcasses originating from herds that would have qualified for the programme during 2006-2008. Food safety was interpreted as prevalence of Salmonella on carcasses as well as the estimated number of human cases of salmonellosis related to pork produced within the programme. Data from the Danish Salmonella programme were obtained from Bornholm. We used a simulation model developed to estimate the number of human cases based on the prevalence of Salmonella on carcass swabs. Herds are only accepted in the programme if they have one or less seropositive sample within the previous 6 months. In this way, the Salmonella load is kept to a minimum. The programme is not yet in operation and pigs that qualify for the programme are currently mixed at slaughter with those that do not qualify. Therefore, we had to assess the impact on the carcass prevalence indirectly. The prevalence of Salmonella in carcass swabs among qualifying herds was 0.46% for the 3 years as a whole, with 2006 as the year with highest prevalence. According to the simulation the expected number of human cases relating to pork produced within the programme was below 10. When the programme is in operation, an extra effect of separating pigs within the programme from those outside is expected to lower the prevalence of Salmonella even further.
PubMed ID
21083813 View in PubMed
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Institutionalized ignorance as a precondition for rational risk expertise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137417
Source
Risk Anal. 2011 Jul;31(7):1083-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Henrik Merkelsen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark. hm.ikk@cbs.dk
Source
Risk Anal. 2011 Jul;31(7):1083-94
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Denmark
Food Handling
Food Safety
Humans
Knowledge
Male
Models, Statistical
Perception
Risk
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Risk Management
Social Class
Trust
Abstract
The present case study seeks to explain the conditions for experts' rational risk perception by analyzing the institutional contexts that constitute a field of food safety expertise in Denmark. The study highlights the role of risk reporting and how contextual factors affect risk reporting from the lowest organizational level, where concrete risks occur, to the highest organizational level, where the body of professional risk expertise is situated. The article emphasizes the role of knowledge, responsibility, loyalty, and trust as risk-attenuation factors and concludes by suggesting that the preconditions for the expert's rationality may rather be a lack of risk-specific knowledge due to poor risk reporting than a superior level of risk knowledge.
PubMed ID
21284683 View in PubMed
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Application of Molecular Typing Results in Source Attribution Models: The Case of Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) of Salmonella Isolates Obtained from Integrated Surveillance in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278946
Source
Risk Anal. 2016 Mar;36(3):571-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Leonardo V de Knegt
Sara M Pires
Charlotta Löfström
Gitte Sørensen
Karl Pedersen
Mia Torpdahl
Eva M Nielsen
Tine Hald
Source
Risk Anal. 2016 Mar;36(3):571-88
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Artifacts
Bacteriophage Typing
Chickens
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks
Ducks
Food Safety
Humans
Meat
Minisatellite Repeats
Models, Statistical
Multilocus Sequence Typing - methods
Salmonella Food Poisoning - diagnosis - microbiology
Salmonella Infections
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
Swine
Turkeys
Abstract
Salmonella is an important cause of bacterial foodborne infections in Denmark. To identify the main animal-food sources of human salmonellosis, risk managers have relied on a routine application of a microbial subtyping-based source attribution model since 1995. In 2013, multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) substituted phage typing as the subtyping method for surveillance of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium isolated from animals, food, and humans in Denmark. The purpose of this study was to develop a modeling approach applying a combination of serovars, MLVA types, and antibiotic resistance profiles for the Salmonella source attribution, and assess the utility of the results for the food safety decisionmakers. Full and simplified MLVA schemes from surveillance data were tested, and model fit and consistency of results were assessed using statistical measures. We conclude that loci schemes STTR5/STTR10/STTR3 for S. Typhimurium and SE9/SE5/SE2/SE1/SE3 for S. Enteritidis can be used in microbial subtyping-based source attribution models. Based on the results, we discuss that an adjustment of the discriminatory level of the subtyping method applied often will be required to fit the purpose of the study and the available data. The issues discussed are also considered highly relevant when applying, e.g., extended multi-locus sequence typing or next-generation sequencing techniques.
PubMed ID
27002674 View in PubMed
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Introducing Food Fraud including translation and interpretation to Russian, Korean, and Chinese languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270201
Source
Food Chem. 2015 Dec 15;189:102-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015
Author
John Spink
Douglas C Moyer
Hyeonho Park
Yongning Wu
Victor Fersht
Bing Shao
Miao Hong
Seung Yeop Paek
Dmitry Edelev
Source
Food Chem. 2015 Dec 15;189:102-7
Date
Dec-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Quality
Food Safety
Fraud - prevention & control
Language
Public Health
Republic of Korea
Russia
Abstract
This paper introduces the topic of Food Fraud with translations to Russian, Korean, and Chinese. The concepts provide a system-wide focus leading to prevention. The goal is not to detect Food Fraud but to adjust entire food supply chains to reduce fraud opportunities. Food Fraud is a recently defined area of Food Protection between Food Safety (such as Salmonella or pesticide residue), and Food Defense (malicious intent to harm such as terrorism). Food Fraud is intentional with no intent to harm but only for economic gain. As with improving Food Safety and Food Defense, preventing Food Fraud is good for society and the economy. Society benefits through fewer public health threats from unauthorized acts. Society also benefits from increased consumer satisfaction and harmony. Food Security is increased through the production of more, higher-value products for consumers, commerce, and exporting. Food Fraud can reduce economic output because sickened citizens cannot work and it also reduces consumer confidence leading to less commerce.
PubMed ID
26190607 View in PubMed
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70 records – page 1 of 7.