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Are Food Advertisements Promoting More Unhealthy Foods and Beverages over Time? Evidence from Three Swedish Food Magazines, 1995-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279943
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Andreas Håkansson
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - trends
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Bread - adverse effects - economics
Consumer Behavior - economics
Dairy Products - adverse effects - economics
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - economics - ethnology
Food - adverse effects - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - adverse effects - economics
Health Promotion - economics - trends
Health Transition
Healthy Diet - economics - trends
Humans
Nutritive Value
Periodicals as Topic - economics
Sweden
Abstract
Unhealthy food in advertising has been suggested as a mediator for the increase in diet-related illness. This study quantitatively investigates changes in food advertising between 1995 and 2014 in terms of food categories promoted, macronutrient content, and percentage of foods classified as heathy or unhealthy from a sample of 7,199 ads from three Swedish food magazines. With the exception of increased alcoholic beverage and decreased carbohydrate-rich-food promotion, no monotonic trends of increasingly unhealthy food advertisement are found. From these findings, it is argued that food magazine advertising is not a mediator of the adverse dietary trend.
PubMed ID
27880047 View in PubMed
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Associations of social and demographic variables with calcium intakes of high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218713
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1994 Mar;94(3):260-6, 269; quiz 267-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
S I Barr
Author Affiliation
School of Family and Nutritional Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1994 Mar;94(3):260-6, 269; quiz 267-8
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Animals
Asia - ethnology
Beverages
British Columbia
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Dairy Products
Diet Records
Eating
Ethnic Groups
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Preferences - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Male
Milk
Milk Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Peer Group
Regression Analysis
Reinforcement, Social
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
To assess usual calcium intake of urban high school students and to assess the association of social and demographic variables with calcium intake.
A self-administered survey instrument containing the following elements: a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) developed to estimate calcium intake; questions to elicit demographic information; and scales to reflect taste enjoyment of dairy products, social reinforcement for consumption of milk, perceptions of others' opinions about milk, and behavioral modeling of milk consumption (ie, the frequency of observing friends' and family members' use of milk). The FFQ was shown to include major sources of calcium in diets of a pretest sample (n = 130).
Urban high schools in a metropolitan setting.
Students in one class per grade level in six high schools (approximately 900 students) were asked to participate. Of the 856 questionnaires completed, 785 were usable.
Total calcium intake, as estimated using the FFQ.
Descriptive statistics, t tests, one-way analysis of variance, correlation analysis, and stepwise multiple regression analysis were used to assess relationships of independent variables with calcium intake.
Mean estimated calcium intakes for male and female students were 1,146 +/- 41 mg/day (mean +/- standard error of the mean) and 815 +/- 26 mg/day (P girls); taste enjoyment of dairy products; number of meals and snacks per day; age; ethnicity (whites > Asians); behavioral modeling of milk consumption; perceptions of others' opinions, recommendations, and use of milk; and soft drink consumption (total adjusted R2 = .304). With the exception of age, these variables were positively associated with calcium intake. Regression equations developed for boys and girls separately revealed that different variables entered the equations.
Most of the variability in adolescents calcium intakes remained unexplained by the variables included in this study. Nevertheless, the results suggest that education programs focusing on taste enjoyment of dairy products and building on the influence of peers and family members may have a positive impact on calcium intake.
PubMed ID
8120289 View in PubMed
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Attribute importance segmentation of Norwegian seafood consumers: The inclusion of salient packaging attributes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291603
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Svein Ottar Olsen
Ho Huu Tuu
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: svein.o.olsen@uit.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Consumer Behavior - economics
Cookbooks as Topic - economics
Cooking - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Packaging - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Food Quality
Food, Preserved - adverse effects - economics
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Internet
Male
Meals - ethnology
Models, Psychological
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Seafood - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of product attributes when buying seafood for homemade meals on weekdays. There is a particular focus on the relative importance of the packaging attributes of fresh seafood. The results are based on a representative survey of 840 Norwegian consumers between 18 and 80 years of age. This study found that taste, freshness, nutritional value and naturalness are the most important attributes for the home consumption of seafood. Except for the high importance of information about expiration date, most other packaging attributes have only medium importance. Three consumer segments are identified based on the importance of 33 attributes associated with seafood: Perfectionists, Quality Conscious and Careless Consumers. The Quality Conscious consumers feel more self-confident in their evaluation of quality, and are less concerned with packaging, branding, convenience and emotional benefits compared to the Perfectionists. Careless Consumers are important as regular consumers of convenient and pre-packed seafood products and value recipe information on the packaging. The seafood industry may use the results provided in this study to strengthen their positioning of seafood across three different consumer segments.
PubMed ID
28669742 View in PubMed
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Changes in food habits among Pakistani immigrant women in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46978
Source
Ethn Health. 2005 Nov;10(4):311-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Tonje Mellin-Olsen
Margareta Wandel
Author Affiliation
Lovisenberg Hospital, N-0440 Oslo, Norway. tonje.mellin-olsen@lds.no
Source
Ethn Health. 2005 Nov;10(4):311-39
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emigration and Immigration
Focus Groups
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preferences - ethnology
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pakistan - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: South Asians are generally known to have high prevalence of diabetes type 2 and coronary heart diseases. The Pakistani immigrant group in Norway constitute a high-risk subgroup of the population that needs a selective prevention approach. The main objective of this study was to provide information on dietary change and factors leading to these changes in Pakistani women after migration from Punjab, Pakistan to Oslo, Norway. Such information is important in designing appropriate strategies for dietary counselling. DESIGN: Twenty-five Pakistani immigrant women, recruited through the Oslo Health Study 2000-2001, participated in focus group interviews. Each group met four times, aided by a moderator and professional interpreters. A model developed by Koctürk was tested for its usefulness in analysing the dietary changes. PRECEDE was used to organise and structure the factors that were found to cause the changes. RESULTS: According to the women, life in Norway has led to several changes in meal pattern, meal composition and intake of different foods. In accordance with the Koctürk model, the cultural importance of breakfast and lunch has diminished, and dinner has become the most important meal. Meals on weekends tend to be more traditional than on working days. The study gives limited support to the hypothesis that changes occur predominantly among the accessory foods and least among staples. The focus group interviews revealed a rich variety of factors influencing dietary change: health aspects, children's preferences, work schedules, social relations, stress, traditional beliefs, climate, season and access of foods. CONCLUSION: To develop effective intervention strategies, it is vital to understand both how changes do occur and how different factors influence dietary habits. The Koctürk model was useful to structure the various foods and changes that may occur. Strategies for dietary counselling should not only include dietary advice but also focus on the multitude of factors causing dietary changes.
PubMed ID
16191730 View in PubMed
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Changing dietary patterns and body mass index over time in Canadian Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128981
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):511-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nelofar Sheikh
Grace M Egeland
Louise Johnson-Down
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):511-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preferences - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Obesity - ethnology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
The International Polar Year (IPY) Inuit Health Survey provided an opportunity to compare dietary and body mass index (BMI) data with data collected a decade earlier for the same communities.
A dietary survey included 1,929 randomly selected participants aged 15 years or older, selected from 18 Inuit communities in 1998-1999. The IPY survey included 2,595 randomly selected participants aged 18 years or older, selected from 36 Inuit communities in 2007-2008. Data from the same 18 communities included in both surveys were compared for adults 20 years and older.
Twenty-four-hour dietary recall data were analysed to assess the percentage of energy from traditional and market foods by sex and age groups. Body mass index (BMI) was assessed to establish the prevalence of obesity by sex and age groups in both surveys.
There was a significant decrease (p=0.05) in energy contribution from traditional food and a significant increase in market food consumption over time. Sugar-sweetened beverages, chips and pasta all increased as percentages of energy. BMI increased overall for women and for each age stratum evaluated (p
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):447-922208994
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):444-622208993
PubMed ID
22152598 View in PubMed
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Changing dietary patterns in the Canadian Arctic: frequency of consumption of foods and beverages by inuit in three Nunavut communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104050
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2014 Jun;35(2):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Tony Sheehy
Fariba Kolahdooz
Cindy Roache
Sangita Sharma
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2014 Jun;35(2):244-52
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arctic Regions
Beverages
Body mass index
Canada
Cereals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology - trends
Dietary Fats
Dietary Sucrose
Female
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Nunavut
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Inuit in Arctic regions are experiencing a rapid diet and lifestyle transition. There are limited data on food consumption patterns among this unique population, raising concerns about assessing the risk for the development of diet-related chronic diseases.
To assess the current frequency of consumption of foods and beverages among Inuit in Nunavut, Arctic Canada.
A cross-sectional dietary study was conducted among randomly selected Inuit adults from three communities in Nunavut using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The participants were 175 women and 36 men with median (IQR) ages of 41.0 (32.5-48.5) and 40.1 (30.0-50.0) years, respectively. The mean and median frequencies of consumption over a 30-day period were computed for 147 individual food items and grouped as foods or beverages.
The 30 most frequently consumed foods were identified. Non-nutrient-dense foods (i.e., high-fat and high-sugar foods) were the most frequently consumed food group (median intake, 3.4 times/day), followed by grains (2.0 times/day) and traditional meats (1.7 times/day). The frequency of consumption of fruits (0.7 times/day) and vegetables (0.4 times/day) was low. The median values for the three most frequently consumed food items were sugar or honey (once/day), butter (0.71 times/day), and Coffee-mate (0.71 times/day). Apart from water, coffee, and tea, the most frequently consumed beverages were sweetened juices (0.71 times/day) and regular pop (soft drinks) (0.36 times/day). This study showed that non-nutrient-dense foods are consumed most frequently in these Inuit communities.
The results have implications for dietary quality and provide useful information on current dietary practices to guide nutritional intervention programs.
PubMed ID
25076772 View in PubMed
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Defatted milk is preferred by Mexican school-age children over whole milk in a sensorial study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115050
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2013;62(3):214-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Yaveth Lara-Zamudio
Salvador Villalpando
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Verónica Mundo-Rosas
Alejandra Contreras-Manzano
Hector Lamadrid-Figueroa
Author Affiliation
Center for Research on Nutrition and Health, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2013;62(3):214-22
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Child
Diet, Fat-Restricted - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preferences - ethnology
Humans
Male
Mexico
Milk - chemistry
Nutrition Policy
Obesity - prevention & control
Physicochemical Phenomena
Questionnaires
Sensation
Taste
Abstract
To compare the liking, flavor and texture of whole, partially defatted and defatted cow's milk using sensory tests.
Children aged 6-16 years, living in indigenous boarding schools in the State of Hidalgo, Mexico, tested samples of whole, partially defatted and defatted cow's milk and answered a questionnaire that explored liking, flavor and texture through ad hoc designed scales. The differences in response proportions were analyzed by ?² tests and multinomial logistic regression models.
Tests were completed by 165 children (79 girls and 86 boys). Rated by habitual consumers of whole, partially defatted and defatted milk, liking (70.6-77.8%, liked it very much), flavor (72.5-77.8%, very tasteful) and texture (41.3-54.9%, not creamy or watery) were better rated for defatted than for whole milk [liking (19.6-29.4%, p
PubMed ID
23548511 View in PubMed
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Dietary acculturation of Arab immigrants in the Greater Toronto Area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120897
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):143-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dahlia Abou El Hassan
Sharareh Hekmat
Author Affiliation
Division of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Brescia University College at the University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):143-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Arabs
Diet - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Focus Groups
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preferences - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
We explored the eating habits of Arab immigrants to determine whether they have maintained their traditional diet or have consumed a more Westernized diet since immigrating to Canada.
Arab immigrants who had been in Canada for at least eight years and were currently living in the Greater Toronto Area were recruited. A sample of 24 Arab immigrants completed a mailed, self-administered questionnaire, and six participated in a focus group. The focus group discussion was transcribed verbatim and results were recorded. Latent content analysis was used to analyze, code, and categorize emerging themes.
Arab immigrants consumed a mixture of both Arabic and Western food and perceived their current diet to be healthier than it was before they immigrated to Canada. Factors that influenced their food choices included increased nutrition health awareness, differences in food preferences and preparation methods, and preservation of dietary practices in the new environment.
Our findings will help dietitians who work with Arab immigrants to become more aware of factors that motivate this group's food choices, and to create nutrition programs that are more culturally sensitive.
PubMed ID
22958634 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns of reservation and non-reservation Native American youths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172225
Source
Ethn Dis. 2005;15(4):705-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jennifer Di Noia
Steven P Schinke
Isobel R Contento
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Columbia University, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, USA. jd201@columbia.edu
Source
Ethn Dis. 2005;15(4):705-12
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Welfare
Cooking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preferences - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Life Style
Neoplasms - ethnology
Statistics as Topic
United States
Urban health
Abstract
A leading cause of morbidity and mortality among Native Americans, cancer is largely preventable through lifestyle habits. Ranked high among those habits is a diet low in fat and high in fiber, fruits, and vegetables. Because Native Americans are not included in national nutritional monitoring systems, limited data exist on the cancer-related dietary habits of this population. To bridge this gap, this study measured the eating patterns of Native American youths in the northeastern United States.
Cross-sectional.
Urban Indian centers and tribal and reservation settings located in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, and Maine.
191 self-identified Native American parents of children between 8 and 14 years of age.
Frequency of intake of foods recommended for inclusion in or omission from a diet to reduce cancer risk.
Dietary patterns among Native American youths differed from a national US sample and varied between youths in reservation and non-reservation settings.
A need exists for nutrition education and behavior change programs that reflect the culturally specific eating habits of the indigenous peoples of the Northeast. Ideally, developing nutrition curricula for specific communities will be done in cooperation with these communities and acknowledge barriers that may limit Native Americans' access to healthful foods.
PubMed ID
16259497 View in PubMed
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The diet of Alaska Native adults: 1987-1988.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3231
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1992 May;55(5):1024-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
E D Nobmann
T. Byers
A P Lanier
J H Hankin
M Y Jackson
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Services, Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchroage 99501.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1992 May;55(5):1024-32
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Animals
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Fishes
Food Preferences - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - administration & dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Shellfish
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Although in the past, rates of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes were lower in Alaska Natives than in US whites, these diseases are now increasing. The rate of iron-deficiency anemia for Alaska Natives continues to be higher than that in the general population. To understand the role of diet in these chronic diseases, seasonal dietary intakes of 351 Alaska Native adults from 11 communities were assessed during 1987-1988. Alaska Natives consumed more energy (19%), protein (39%), fat (21%), carbohydrate (13%), iron (25%), vitamin A (53%), and vitamin C (31%), but less calcium (19%) than did the general US adult population [National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II (NHANES II)]; Alaska Natives consumed six times more fish but less fruits and vegetables. Results suggest that energy and protein intakes decreased in the last 30 y but the proportion of energy from fat (37%) remained unchanged. High fish consumption and large seasonal dietary variations persisted, which may protect against chronic diseases. However, excess energy and fat and low calcium, fruit, and vegetable intakes may be contributing to recent increases in chronic diseases. Dietary guidelines are proposed.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):698-98480692
PubMed ID
1570796 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.