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Ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter spp. in retail chicken, western Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113101
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;19(7):1121-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Agnes Agunos
David Léger
Brent P Avery
E Jane Parmley
Anne Deckert
Carolee A Carson
Lucie Dutil
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. agnes.agunos@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;19(7):1121-4
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
British Columbia
Campylobacter - drug effects - isolation & purification
Chickens - microbiology
Ciprofloxacin - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Food Microbiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Saskatchewan
Tetracycline - pharmacology
Abstract
During 2005-2010, the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance identified increased prevalence of ciprofloxacin (a fluororquinolone) resistance among Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken in British Columbia (4%-17%) and Saskatchewan (6%-11%), Canada. Fluoroquinolones are critically important to human medicine and are not labeled for use in poultry in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23764141 View in PubMed
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Effects of shearing and fleece cleanliness on microbiological contamination of lamb carcasses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131923
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2011 Nov 1;150(2-3):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2011
Author
Sigrun J Hauge
Ola Nafstad
Eystein Skjerve
Ole-Johan Røtterud
Truls Nesbakken
Author Affiliation
Animalia Norwegian Meat and Poultry Research Centre, P. O. Box 396 Økern, 0513 Oslo, Norway. sigrun.hauge@animalia.no
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2011 Nov 1;150(2-3):178-83
Date
Nov-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs - standards - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Escherichia coli - growth & development - isolation & purification
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology - statistics & numerical data
Hair - microbiology
Humans
Hygiene
Meat - microbiology
Norway
Sheep - microbiology
Abstract
The meat industry in Norway has developed national guidelines for Good Hygiene Practices for slaughtering and skinning, based on categorisation of animals. These include shearing sheep and lambs in the abattoirs immediately before slaughter. The aim of this study was to investigate microbiological carcass contamination associated with: (i) different shearing regimes; (ii) fleece cleanliness; and (iii) the slaughter process. In addition, the efficacy of the national guidelines in reducing microbial contamination was evaluated. A total of 280 swab samples were collected from the brisket areas (100 cm(2)) of 140 naturally contaminated lamb carcasses in a commercial abattoir. Half the samples were collected at skinning of brisket areas at the start of the slaughter-line and half of them were collected at the end of slaughter-line, just before chilling. The lambs were divided into four groups (n=35) according to the duration of the period between shearing and slaughter: (i) 0 days (shorn at the abattoir immediately before slaughter); (ii) three days; (iii) seven days; and (iv) not shorn. Mean log colony forming units (CFU) per 100 cm(2) at skinning were 5.78 and 6.95 for aerobic plate count (APC) (P
PubMed ID
21862163 View in PubMed
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Food and water security issues in Russia I: food security in the general population of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105147
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21848
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Pavel R Alloyarov
Valery S Chupakhin
Eugenia V Dushkina
Yuliya N Sladkova
Vitaliy M Dorofeyev
Tatijana A Kolesnikova
Kirill B Fridman
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21848
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Far East - epidemiology
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Food Microbiology - statistics & numerical data
Food Safety
Food Supply - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Malnutrition - economics - epidemiology - etiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements - physiology
Russia - epidemiology
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Problems related to food security in Russian Arctic (dietary imbalance, predominance of carbohydrates, shortage of milk products, vegetables and fruits, deficit of vitamins and microelements, chemical, infectious and parasitic food contamination) have been defined in the literature. But no standard protocol of food security assessment has been used in the majority of studies.
Our aim was to obtain food security indicators, identified within an Arctic collaboration, for selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, and to compare food safety in these territories.
In 18 regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, the following indicators of food security were analyzed: food costs, food consumption, and chemical and biological food contamination for the period 2000-2011.
Food costs in the regions are high, comprising 23-43% of household income. Only 4 out of 10 food groups (fish products, cereals, sugar, plant oil) are consumed in sufficient amounts. The consumption of milk products, eggs, vegetables, potatoes, fruits (and berries) is severely low in a majority of the selected regions. There are high levels of biological contamination of food in many regions. The biological and chemical contamination situation is alarming, especially in Chukotka. Only 7 food pollutants are under regular control; among pesticides, only DDT. Evenki AO and Magadan Oblast have reached peak values in food contaminants compared with other regions. Mercury in local fish has not been analyzed in the majority of the regions. In 3 regions, no monitoring of DDT occurs. Aflatoxins have not been analyzed in 5 regions. Nitrates had the highest percentage in excess of the hygienic threshold in all regions. Excesses of other pollutants in different regions were episodic and as a rule not high.
Improvement of the food supply and food accessibility in the regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East is of utmost importance. Both quantitative and qualitative control of chemical and biological contaminants in food is insufficient and demands radical enhancement aimed at improving food security.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2153023940840
PubMed ID
24471055 View in PubMed
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