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An update on the vitamin D content of fortified milk from the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219860
Source
N Engl J Med. 1993 Nov 11;329(20):1507
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-11-1993

Criteria for labelling infant formulas as "hypoallergenic". Allergy Section, Canadian Pediatric Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218591
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1994
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Date
Mar-15-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology
Food Inspection - standards
Food Labeling - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Pediatrics
Societies, Medical
Notes
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1971 Jan;29(1):1-75170581
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Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Jan;118(1):74-71986103
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Apr;118(4 Pt 1):520-52007924
Cites: Allergy. 1978 Feb;33(1):3-1477135
PubMed ID
8131121 View in PubMed
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Exploring global consumer attitudes toward nutrition information on food labels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149987
Source
Nutr Rev. 2009 May;67 Suppl 1:S102-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Josephine M Wills
David B Schmidt
Francy Pillo-Blocka
Georgina Cairns
Author Affiliation
European Food Information Council, Brussels, Belgium. jo.wills@eufic.org
Source
Nutr Rev. 2009 May;67 Suppl 1:S102-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia
Attitude to Health
Canada
Choice Behavior
Consumer Participation
Europe
Food Labeling - standards
Food Packaging
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Sciences - education
United States
Abstract
In many parts of the world, food companies, consumers, and governments are re-examining the provision of nutrition information on food labels. It is important that the nutrition information provided be appropriate and understandable to the consumer and that it impact food-choice behaviors. Potentially, food labeling represents a valuable tool to help consumers make informed decisions about their diet and lifestyle. Food information organizations worldwide have been following consumer trends in the use of this information as well as consumer attitudes about food, nutrition, and health. This paper summarizes a workshop that examined consumer attitudes gathered regionally with the aim of establishing commonalities and differences.
PubMed ID
19453661 View in PubMed
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Food products qualifying for and carrying front-of-pack symbols: a cross-sectional study examining a manufacturer led and a non-profit organization led program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107272
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:846
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Teri E Emrich
Joanna E Cohen
Wendy Y Lou
Mary R L'Abbé
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, FitzGerald Building, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Canada. mary.labbe@utoronto.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:846
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Food - standards
Food Industry - standards
Food Labeling - standards
Food Packaging - standards
Health Food - standards
Humans
Industry - organization & administration
Male
Needs Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Organizations, Nonprofit - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Concern has been raised that the coexistence of multiple front-of-pack (FOP) nutrition rating systems in a marketplace may mislead consumers into believing that a specific food with a FOP is 'healthier' than foods without the symbol. Eleven summary indicator FOP systems are in use in Canada, including one non-profit developed system, the Heart and Stroke Foundation's Health Check™, and ten manufacturer-developed systems, like Kraft's Sensible Solutions™. This study evaluated FOP's potential to mislead consumers by comparing the number of products qualifying to carry a given FOP symbol to the number of products that actually carry the symbol.
The nutritional criteria for the Health Check™ and the Sensible Solutions™ systems were applied to a 2010-2011 Canadian national database of packaged food products. The proportion of foods qualifying for a given FOP system was compared to the proportion carrying the symbol using McNemar's test.
Criteria were available to categorize 7503 and 3009 of the 10,487 foods in the database under Health Check™ and Sensible Solutions™, respectively. Overall 45% of the foods belonging to a Health Check™ category qualified for Health Check's™ symbol, while only 7.5% of the foods carried the symbol. Up to 79.1% of the foods belonging to a Sensible Solutions™, category qualified for Sensible Solutions's™ symbol while only 4.1% of the foods carried the symbol. The level of agreement between products qualifying for and carrying FOP systems was poor to moderate in the majority of food categories for both systems. More than 75% of the products in 24 of the 85 Health Check™ subcategories and 9 of 11 Sensible Solution™ categories/subcategories qualified for their respective symbols based on their nutritional composition.
FOP systems as they are currently applied are not, in most instances, a useful guide to identifying healthier food products in the supermarket as many more products qualify for these systems than the number of products actually displaying these symbols on FOP, and the level of agreement between qualifying and carrying products is poor to moderate. The adoption of a single, standardized FOP system would assure consumers that all products meeting certain nutritional standards are designated by the symbol.
Notes
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2002 Mar;17(1):13-911847134
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2003 Mar;18(1):51-612571092
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Mar-Apr;95(2):146-5015074908
Cites: Fam Med. 2005 May;37(5):360-315883903
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):238-4417288620
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Jun;38(6):666-7223724885
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:18419523212
Cites: Appetite. 2010 Dec;55(3):707-920678531
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Jul-Aug;102(4):313-621913591
Cites: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012 Spring;73(1):e227-3222397960
Cites: Adv Nutr. 2012 May;3(3):332-322585907
Cites: Appetite. 2008 Jan;50(1):57-7017629351
PubMed ID
24034717 View in PubMed
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Gluten contamination in the Canadian commercial oat supply.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134095
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
T B Koerner
C. Cléroux
C. Poirier
I. Cantin
A. Alimkulov
H. Elamparo
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Terry.Koerner@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):705-10
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Avena sativa - chemistry
Canada
Celiac Disease - diet therapy
Cereals - chemistry - economics - standards
Diet, Gluten-Free - economics - standards
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Food Contamination
Food Hypersensitivity - diet therapy
Food Labeling - standards
Food, Organic - analysis - economics - standards
Glutens - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Legislation, Food
Limit of Detection
Seasons
Seeds - chemistry
Abstract
A growing body of evidence suggests that a majority of people with celiac disease and on a gluten-free diet can safely consume pure oats in moderate amounts; however, previous studies have indicated that the commercial oat supply in other countries, and in Canada to some extent, is contaminated with other grains. This study has confirmed that the commercial oat supply in Canada is heavily contaminated with gluten from other grains. Approximately 88% of the oat samples (n = 133) were contaminated above 20 mg kg(-1) and there were no differences between the oat types tested. Only one gluten-free variety of oats was analysed and it consistently provided negative results in all analyses. It is difficult to determine where the contamination originates, but there are possibilities for cross-contamination in the field, in the transport of the grain, in the storage of the grain, and in the milling and packaging facilities. It is clear from this study that only those products that have been certified 'pure' oats would be appropriate for a gluten-free diet.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Jan 17;346(3):180-811796853
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Feb;125(2 Suppl 2):S116-2520042231
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Nov 4;351(19):2021-215525734
Cites: Allergy. 2005 Jun;60(6):815-2115876313
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2005 Jun;18(3):163-915882378
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Mar 1;23(5):559-7516480395
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 May;106(5):665; discussion 665-616647318
Cites: Postgrad Med J. 2006 Oct;82(972):672-817068278
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Oct;21(10):649-5117948135
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2007 Nov;42(11):1302-517852883
Cites: Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Jun;20(6):545-5418467914
Cites: Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2008 Nov;24(6):687-9119122516
Cites: Adv Food Nutr Res. 2009;57:235-8519595389
Cites: Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2009 Sep;38(3):433-4619699406
Cites: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010 Jan;104(1):60-520143647
Cites: Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2010 Mar;26(2):116-2220040864
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Mar;103(3):376-912616264
PubMed ID
21623493 View in PubMed
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Glycemic index claims on food labels: review of Health Canada's evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106808
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Dec;67(12):1229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
T M S Wolever
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto; Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital; and Glycemic Index Laboratories, Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Dec;67(12):1229-33
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates
Food
Food Labeling - standards
Glycemic Index
Health promotion
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Abstract
Recently Health Canada (HC) published its opinion that including glycemic index (GI) values on food labels would be misleading and not add value to nutrition labeling and dietary guidelines to help consumers make healthier food choices. Important areas of concern were identified by HC, but the discussion of them is scientifically invalid. HC concluded that GI has poor precision for labeling purposes based on incorrect application of the standard deviation. In fact, GI methodology is precise enough to distinguish, with high probability, low-GI (GI = 55) from high-GI (GI = 70) foods and to pass the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Nutrition Compliance Test procedure. HC rightly concluded that GI does not respond to portion size, whereas glycemic response does, but no valid evidence was provided to support the assertion that a lower-GI food could have a higher glycemic response. HC's focus on glycemic response could promote a low-carbohydrate diet inconsistent with nutrition recommendations. HC correctly concluded that GI is unresponsive to the replacement of available- with unavailable-carbohydrate but this is irrelevant to GI labeling. HC is rightly concerned about promoting unhealthy low-GI foods; however, this could be avoided by prohibiting GI labeling on such foods. Therefore, HC has provided neither a helpful nor scientifically valid evaluation of GI for labeling purposes but has contributed to the wealth of misinformation about GI in the literature. Currently, Canadian consumers only have access to unregulated and misleading information about GI; well-crafted guidelines for GI labeling would provide consumers accurate information about GI and help them make healthier food choices.
PubMed ID
24105325 View in PubMed
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The impact of a gluten-free diet on adults with coeliac disease: results of a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170943
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2006 Feb;19(1):41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
M. Zarkadas
A. Cranney
S. Case
M. Molloy
C. Switzer
I D Graham
J D Butzner
M. Rashid
R E Warren
V. Burrows
Author Affiliation
Canadian Celiac Association, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. czarkadas@sympatico.ca
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2006 Feb;19(1):41-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Celiac Disease - diagnosis - diet therapy - psychology
Female
Food Labeling - standards
Glutens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE We sought to evaluate the impact of the gluten-free diet on the 5,240 members of the Canadian Celiac Association (CCA). Data are presented on 2,681 adults (>or=16 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease (CD).
A mail-out survey was used. Quality of life was evaluated using the 'SF12', and celiac-specific questions.
Mean age was 56 years, mean age at diagnosis was 45 years, and 75% were female. The 'SF12' summary scores were similar to normative Canadian data, but were significantly lower for females and newly diagnosed patients. Respondents reported: following a gluten-free (GF) diet (90%), improvement on the diet (83%), and difficulties following the diet (44%), which included: determining if foods were GF (85%), finding GF foods in stores (83%), avoiding restaurants (79%), and avoiding travel (38%). Most common reactions to consumed gluten (among 73%) included pain, diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, nausea, and headache. Excellent information on CD and its treatment was provided by the CCA (64%), gastroenterologists (28%), dietitians (26%) and family doctor (12%).
Quality of life in those with CD could be increased with early diagnosis, increased availability of gluten-free foods, improved food labelling, and better dietary instruction. Education of physicians and dietitians about CD and its treatment is essential.
PubMed ID
16448474 View in PubMed
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Labelling the salt content in foods: a useful tool in reducing sodium intake in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162705
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Apr;11(4):335-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Pirjo Pietinen
Liisa M Valsta
Tero Hirvonen
Harri Sinkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. pirjo.pietinen@ktl.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Apr;11(4):335-40
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Finland
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Labeling - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Public Health
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage - analysis
Abstract
To estimate the impact of choosing food products labelled either as low or high in salt on salt intake in the Finnish adult population.
The National FINDIET 2002 survey with 48-hour recalls from 2007 subjects aged 25-64 years. Sodium intake was calculated based on the Fineli food composition database including the sodium content of natural and processed foods as well as the salt content of recipes. The distribution of salt intake was calculated in different ways: the present situation; assuming that all breads, cheeses, processed meat and fish, breakfast cereals and fat spreads consumed would be either 'lightly salted' or 'heavily salted' based on the current labelling practice; and, in addition, assuming that all foods would be prepared with 50% less or more salt.
Excluding underreporters, the mean salt intake would be reduced by 1.8 g in men and by 1.0 g in women if the entire population were to choose lightly salted products and further by 2.5 and 1.8 g, respectively, if also salt used in cooking were halved. Choosing heavily salted products would increase salt intake by 2.1 g in men and by 1.4 g in women. In the worst scenarios, salt intake would be further increased by 2.3 g in men and by 1.6 g in women.
These calculations show that the potential impact of labelling and giving consumers the possibility to choose products with less salt is of public health importance. In addition, strategies to reduce the salt content of all food groups are needed.
PubMed ID
17605838 View in PubMed
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Levels of total mercury in predatory fish sold in Canada in 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134092
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):740-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
R W Dabeka
A D McKenzie
D S Forsyth
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. bob.dabeka@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):740-3
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Fishes
Food Contamination
Food Labeling - standards
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Legislation, Food
Limit of Detection
Mercury - analysis
Mercury Poisoning - prevention & control
Seafood - analysis - economics - standards
Species Specificity
Abstract
Total mercury was analysed in 188 samples of predatory fish purchased at the retail level in Canada in 2005. The average concentrations (ng g(-1), range) were: sea bass 329 (38-1367), red snapper 148 (36-431), orange roughy 543 (279-974), fresh water trout 55 (20-430), grouper 360 (8-1060), black cod 284 (71-651), Arctic char 37 (28-54), king fish 440 (42-923), tilefish 601 (79-1164) and marlin 854 (125-2346). The Canadian standard for maximum total mercury allowed in the edible portions of fish sold at the retail level is 1000 ng g(-1) for shark, swordfish, marlin, orange roughy, escolar and both fresh and frozen tuna. The standard is 500 ng g(-1) for all other types of fish. In this study, despite the small number of samples of each species, the 1000 ng g(-1) maximum was exceeded in five samples of marlin (28%). The 500 ng g(-1) maximum was exceeded by six samples of sea bass (20%), four of tilefish (50%), five of grouper (24%), six of king fish (40%) and one of black cod (13%).
Notes
Cites: J AOAC Int. 2002 Sep-Oct;85(5):1136-4312374414
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2003 Jul;20(7):629-3812888388
Cites: Chemosphere. 1997 Dec;35(12):2909-139415980
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2004 May;21(5):434-4015204544
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2003 Sep;20(9):813-813129776
PubMed ID
21623497 View in PubMed
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Nutrition tools for patients: helping patients making healthful choices!

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190894
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Mar;18(3):241-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Carol Dombrow
Author Affiliation
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Mar;18(3):241-2
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Decision Making
Diet - standards
Food Labeling - standards
Humans
Nutritional Sciences - education
Patient Education as Topic
PubMed ID
11907608 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.