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The Canadian Dietetic Association Biotechnology Committee opinion paper on biotechnology and food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212684
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1995;56(2):63-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1995;56(2):63-7
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Biotechnology - standards
Canada
Consumer Advocacy - standards
Dietetics - standards
Food Handling - standards
Food Inspection - standards
Humans
Societies
Abstract
Biotechnology allows scientists to improve foods, create new food products and provide better tools to ensure food safety. It can assist in achieving the goal of an abundant, safe and nutritious food supply for a growing population. These technologies can lead to a greater variety of food with improved taste, nutrition and cooking quality. There are valid concerns about the widespread use of biotechnology which remain to be addressed by health, scientific and consumer constituencies. Dietitians need to be informed about biotechnology in food production and processing. They need to be aware of potential benefits and risks. Dietitians are uniquely positioned to inform the public about food safety and food products of biotechnology. Dietitians can discuss this information in understandable language and with sensitivity to public values. Dietitians should participate in the development of food-related policies at local, provincial and federal levels.
PubMed ID
10142851 View in PubMed
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Criteria for labelling infant formulas as "hypoallergenic". Allergy Section, Canadian Pediatric Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218591
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1994
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Date
Mar-15-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology
Food Inspection - standards
Food Labeling - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Pediatrics
Societies, Medical
Notes
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1971 Jan;29(1):1-75170581
Cites: Allergy Proc. 1991 Jul-Aug;12(4):239-441936972
Cites: Clin Exp Immunol. 1978 May;32(2):263-71668201
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand. 1978 Jul;67(4):497-504676736
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Oct;93(4):561-4568172
Cites: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1982;1(1):23-86892249
Cites: Anal Biochem. 1983 Sep;133(2):288-916638494
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1985 Aug;60(8):727-354037856
Cites: Clin Allergy. 1985 Nov;15(6):517-224075514
Cites: Pediatrics. 1987 May;79(5):683-83575022
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1989 Apr;62(4):333-52705659
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1989 Jul;84(1):72-892754147
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1989 Aug;84(2):2722760363
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1989 Aug;63(2):102-62669565
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Jan;85(1 Pt 1):108-152299096
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Jan;118(1):71-41986102
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Jan;118(1):74-71986103
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Apr;118(4 Pt 1):520-52007924
Cites: Allergy. 1978 Feb;33(1):3-1477135
PubMed ID
8131121 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of routine meat inspection of Danish slaughter pigs using Latent Class Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98158
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2010 May 1;94(3-4):165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2010
Author
Marianne Bonde
Nils Toft
Peter T Thomsen
Jan Tind Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Health and Bioscience, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Aarhus, Blichers Alle 20, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark.
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2010 May 1;94(3-4):165-9
Date
May-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Denmark
Food Inspection - standards
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - pathology - veterinary
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology - pathology - veterinary
Meat - standards
Parasitic Diseases, Animal - epidemiology - pathology
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - pathology - veterinary
Sensitivity and specificity
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Abstract
Two groups of observers, regular meat inspectors and two veterinary researchers, respectively, conducted independent veterinary meat inspection of organs of slaughter pigs from organic or conventional production systems slaughtered at one abattoir in April 2005. A total of 3054 pigs (899 organic and 2155 conventional) were examined. The observed pathological disorders were grouped in four categories; respiratory disorders (RESP), parasitic disorders (PAR), intestinal disorders (INT) and heart disorders (HEART). Using a latent class model, the sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of meat inspectors and researchers were estimated without the assumption of an available gold standard. The Se for the regular meat inspection was found to be 0.92, 0.16, 0.24 and 0.49 for RESP, PAR, INT and HEART, respectively. The Se for the researchers was found to be 0.81, 0.96, 0.91 and 0.68 for RESP, PAR, INT and HEART, respectively. The Sp for the regular meat inspection was found to be between 0.98 and 1.00 for the four categories. The Sp for the researchers was found to be 0.83, 0.94, 0.76 and 0.99 for RESP, PAR, INT and HEART, respectively. The low Se of ordinary meat inspection for parasitic, intestinal and heart disorders will cause a significant underestimation of the prevalence of diseases reported to the pig producers. Based on our results the true prevalence of diseases (conventional vs. organic slaughter pigs) was (in %): 42 vs. 16, 5 vs. 51, 5 vs. 12 and 9 vs. 5 for RESP, PAR, INT and HEART, respectively.
PubMed ID
20132995 View in PubMed
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Investigating the potential benefits of on-site food safety training for Folklorama, a temporary food service event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120053
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Oct;75(10):1829-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Roberto Mancini
Leigh Murray
Benjamin J Chapman
Douglas A Powell
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, USA.
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Oct;75(10):1829-34
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods - standards
Food Inspection - standards - trends
Food Microbiology
Food Safety
Food Services - manpower - standards
Foodborne Diseases - prevention & control
Health Education - methods - organization & administration - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Manitoba
Abstract
Folklorama in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, is a 14-day temporary food service event that explores the many different cultural realms of food, food preparation, and entertainment. In 2010, the Russian pavilion at Folklorama was implicated in a foodborne outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 that caused 37 illnesses and 18 hospitalizations. The ethnic nature and diversity of foods prepared within each pavilion presents a unique problem for food inspectors, as each culture prepares food in their own very unique way. The Manitoba Department of Health and Folklorama Board of Directors realized a need to implement a food safety information delivery program that would be more effective than a 2-h food safety course delivered via PowerPoint slides. The food operators and event coordinators of five randomly chosen pavilions selling potentially hazardous food were trained on-site, in their work environment, focusing on critical control points specific to their menu. A control group (five pavilions) did not receive on-site food safety training and were assessed concurrently. Public health inspections for all 10 pavilions were performed by Certified Public Health Inspectors employed with Manitoba Health. Critical infractions were assessed by means of standardized food protection inspection reports. The results suggest no statistically significant difference in food inspection scores between the trained and control groups. However, it was found that inspection report results increased for both the control and trained groups from the first inspection to the second, implying that public health inspections are necessary in correcting unsafe food safety practices. The results further show that in this case, the 2-h food safety course delivered via slides was sufficient to pass public health inspections. Further evaluations of alternative food safety training approaches are warranted.
PubMed ID
23043832 View in PubMed
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[Main trends in the activities of the Ukrainian sanitary and epidemiological services with regard to public nutrition]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62341
Source
Gig Sanit. 1985 Feb;(2):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985

[Organization of State sanitary inspection of food products from genetically modified sources].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194043
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2000;69(6):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000

A qualitative exploration of the perceptions and information needs of public health inspectors responsible for food safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142809
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:345
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mai T Pham
Andria Q Jones
Jan M Sargeant
Barbara J Marshall
Catherine E Dewey
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada. phamm@uoguelph.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:345
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Adult
Canada
Female
Focus Groups
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Inspection - standards
Hand Disinfection
Humans
Information Services
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Professional Competence
Public Health - standards
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Safety - standards
Abstract
In Ontario, local public health inspectors play an important frontline role in protecting the public from foodborne illness. This study was an in-depth exploration of public health inspectors' perceptions of the key food safety issues in public health, and their opinions and needs with regards to food safety information resources.
Four focus group discussions were conducted with public health inspectors from the Central West region of Ontario, Canada during June and July, 2008. A questioning route was used to standardize qualitative data collection. Audio recordings of sessions were transcribed verbatim and data-driven content analysis was performed.
A total of 23 public health inspectors participated in four focus group discussions. Five themes emerged as key food safety issues: time-temperature abuse, inadequate handwashing, cross-contamination, the lack of food safety knowledge by food handlers and food premise operators, and the lack of food safety information and knowledge about specialty foods (i.e., foods from different cultures). In general, participants reported confidence with their current knowledge of food safety issues and foodborne pathogens. Participants highlighted the need for a central source for food safety information, access to up-to-date food safety information, resources in different languages, and additional food safety information on specialty foods.
The information gathered from these focus groups can provide a basis for the development of resources that will meet the specific needs of public health inspectors involved in protecting and promoting food safety.
Notes
Cites: MMWR CDC Surveill Summ. 2000 Mar 17;49(1):1-6210789699
Cites: J Food Prot. 2003 Jun;66(6):953-6112800994
Cites: J Environ Health. 2006 Jun;68(10):32-816779999
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):178-8115913079
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2004 Nov;63(4):655-6015831139
PubMed ID
20553592 View in PubMed
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Restaurant inspection frequency and food safety compliance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154286
Source
J Environ Health. 2008 Nov;71(4):56-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
K Bruce Newbold
Marie McKeary
Robert Hart
Robert Hall
Author Affiliation
School of Geography & Earth Sciences, McMaster Institute of Environment & Health, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. newbold@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Environ Health. 2008 Nov;71(4):56-61
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Inspection - standards - trends
Guideline Adherence
Health Services - standards
Humans
Ontario
Restaurants - standards
Abstract
Although food premises are regularly inspected, little information is available on the effect of inspections on compliance records, particularly with respect to the impact of the frequency of inspection on compliance. The following presents the outcome of a study designed to assess the impact of increased inspection frequency on compliance measures in Hamilton, Ontario, in the absence of any other changes to food handler/safety programs or legislation. High-risk food inspection premises were randomly assigned three, four, or five inspections per year. Results indicate that no statistical difference existed in outcome measures based on frequency of inspection. When premises were grouped based on the average time between inspections, premises with greater time between inspections scored better compliance measures relative to premises that were inspected more frequently. The study was also unique for the level of consultation and collaboration sought from the public health inspectors (PHIs) assigned to the Food Safety Program. Their knowledge and experience with respect to the critical variables associated with compliance were a complementary component to the literature review conducted by the research team.
PubMed ID
19004396 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.