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A 6-month follow-up study of 1048 patients diagnosed with an occupational skin disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147641
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Tarja Mälkönen
Riitta Jolanki
Kristiina Alanko
Ritva Luukkonen
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Antti Lauerma
Päivikki Susitaival
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Control of Hypersensitivity Diseases and Services for Statistics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Industry
Hand Dermatoses - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Patch Tests
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Urticaria - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Occupational skin diseases (OSDs) often have considerable medical and occupational consequences. Previous data on prognostic factors have been derived from studies with fairly small sample sizes.
To determine the medical and occupational outcome in 1048 patients diagnosed with OSD at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and to identify the prognostic risk factors for the continuation of OSD.
Patients examined in 1994-2001 filled out a follow-up questionnaire 6 months after the diagnosis. Data on atopy, contact allergies, and occupation were analysed.
Six months after the diagnosis the skin disease had healed in 27% of the patients. The OSD had cleared up in 17% of those with no changes at work, and in 34% of those who had changed their job/occupation. The best clearing had occurred in the patients with contact urticaria (35%), whereas the healing of allergic (27%) and irritant (23%) contact dermatitis was similar. The risk factors for continuing occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were no changes in work, age > 45 years, food-related occupations, respiratory atopy, and male sex.
The healing of OSD was associated with discontinuation of the causative exposure. A change in work and the presence of easily avoidable work-related allergies were associated with a good prognosis.
PubMed ID
19878240 View in PubMed
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[About flavouring substances and flavouring preparations regulation in the field of manufacturing of flavourings and foodstuffs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112655
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
O V Bagriantseva
G N Shatrov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Flavoring Agents - pharmacology - standards
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Food Safety
Humans
Russia
Abstract
In article are given substantiation for modification of contemporary list of biologically active substances with undesirable toxicological qualities (namely included in this list of menthofuran, methyleugenol (4-Allyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene), teucrin A, capsaicin, estragol1 (-Allyl-4-methoxybenzene) and excluded from the list of quinine, santonin, berberin) and developing the list of plants--natural sources of flavourings substances. The new criteria of European Union for including into the relevant for using in/on foodstuff list of flavouring substances, which was published in the Comission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 872/2012 concerning flavourings, listed the 11 flavouring substances for which have been established indexes of foodstuffs in manufacturing, which there are could using and criteria of their safety (caffeine, theobromine, neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, rebaudioside A, d-camphor, three quinine salts (FL 14.011, FL 14.152 and FL 14.155), glycyrrhizic acid and its ammoniated form, ammonium chloride, discussed the possibility of using R- and S-isomers of flavouring substances and L- and D-forms of aminoacids for preparing of flavours, are discussed. Improving of the system of safety using of flavourings in Russian Federation, harmonized with demands of European Union and FAQ/WHO, are, at first, connected with the necessity of reevaluation of the list flavouring substances, which could be use in/on foodstuff, developing of list of the plants--natural sources of flavourings substances and preparations and regulations of using flavourings preparations which can include biologically active substances.
PubMed ID
23808275 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism following a workplace intervention for older food industry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133397
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
A. Siukola
P. Virtanen
H. Huhtala
C-H Nygård
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. anna.siukola@uta.fi
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Age Factors
Finland
Food Industry
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - methods
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Abstract
The effects of workplace interventions on sickness absence are poorly understood, in particular in ageing workers.
To analyse the effects of a senior programme on sickness absence among blue-collar food industry workers of a food company in Finland.
We followed up 129 employees aged 55 years or older, who participated in a senior programme (intervention group), and 229 employees of the same age from the same company who did not participate (control group). Total sickness absence days and spells of 1-3, 4-7, 8-21 and >21 days were recorded for the members of the intervention group from the year before joining the programme and for the control group starting at age 54 years. Both groups were followed for up to 6 years.
The median number of sickness absence days per person-year increased significantly from baseline in both groups during the follow-up. Compared with the control group, the intervention group had increased risk for 1-3 days spells [rate ratio 1.34 (1.21-1.48)] and 4-7 days spells [rate ratio 1.23 (1.07-1.41)], but the risk for >21 days spells was decreased [rate ratio 0.68 (0.53-0.88)] after participation in the senior programme.
A programme to enhance individual work well-being in ageing workers may increase short-term but reduce long-term sickness absence.
PubMed ID
21709171 View in PubMed
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[Ambient air pollution with flour dust at the sites of baking and macaroni enterprises].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136821
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Sep-Oct;(5):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Tepikina
A A Safiulin
Z V Shipulina
L T Volokhova
A B Kariakina
L S L'vova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Sep-Oct;(5):22-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dust - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Flour
Food Industry
Humans
Incidence
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Ambient air pollution with flour dust (FD) and microorganisms, including microscopic fungi, was studied; the single concentrations of FD under emission plumes were 0.12-0.17 mg/m3; the total content of mould, field, and storage fungi was 700 +/- 30, 671 +/- 19, and 29 +/- 3, respectively. The maximum allowable concentrations for FD were ascertained; the equal ones were the maximum single concentration of 1.0; the daily average concentration was 0.4 mg/m3; hazard class IV; the limiting hazard index was their resorptive activity.
PubMed ID
21341487 View in PubMed
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Analysis of nicotine, 3-hydroxycotinine, cotinine, and caffeine in urine of passive smokers by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200103
Source
Clin Chem. 1999 Dec;45(12):2164-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
T. Tuomi
T. Johnsson
K. Reijula
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH), Indoor Air & Environment Program of the FIOH, Uusimaa Regional Institute, Arinatie 3A, 00370 Helsinki, Finland. tapani.tuomi@occuphealth.fi
Source
Clin Chem. 1999 Dec;45(12):2164-72
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caffeine - chemistry - urine
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Cotinine - analogs & derivatives - chemistry - urine
Finland
Food Industry
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Nicotine - chemistry - urine
Occupational Exposure
Reproducibility of Results
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract
A method is described for the simultaneous analysis of nicotine and two of its major metabolites, cotinine and 3-hydroxycotinine, as well as for caffeine from urine samples. The method was developed to assess exposure of restaurant and hotel workers to environmental tobacco smoke.
The method includes sample pretreatment and reversed-phase HPLC separation with tandem mass spectrometric identification and quantification using electrospray ionization on a quadrupole ion trap mass analyzer. Sample pretreatment followed standard protocols, including addition of base before liquid-liquid partitioning against dichloromethane on a solid matrix, evaporation of the organic solvent using gaseous nitrogen, and transferring to HPLC vials using HPLC buffer. HPLC separation was run on-line with the electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometric detection.
The detection limits of the procedure were in the 1 microg/L range, except for nicotine (10 microg/L of urine). Still lower detection limits can be achieved with larger sample volumes. Recoveries of the sample treatment varied from 99% (cotinine) to 78% (3-hydroxycotinine).
The method described is straightforward and not labor-intensive and, therefore, permits a high throughput of samples with excellent prospects for automation. The applicability of the method was demonstrated in a small-scale study on restaurant employees.
PubMed ID
10585349 View in PubMed
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An international outbreak of salmonellosis associated with raw almonds contaminated with a rare phage type of Salmonella enteritidis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176326
Source
J Food Prot. 2005 Jan;68(1):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
S. Isaacs
J. Aramini
B. Ciebin
J A Farrar
R. Ahmed
D. Middleton
A U Chandran
L J Harris
M. Howes
E. Chan
A S Pichette
K. Campbell
A. Gupta
L Y Lior
M. Pearce
C. Clark
F. Rodgers
F. Jamieson
I. Brophy
A. Ellis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 5B2. sandy_isaacs@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2005 Jan;68(1):191-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteriophage Typing
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Disease Outbreaks
Equipment Contamination
Female
Food Contamination
Food Industry - standards
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prunus - microbiology
Risk factors
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Salmonella Phages - classification - isolation & purification
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Abstract
During the winter of 2000 to 2001, an outbreak due to Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) phage type 30 (PT30), a rare strain, was detected in Canada. The ensuing investigation involved Canadian and American public health and food regulatory agencies and an academic research laboratory. Enhanced laboratory surveillance, including phage typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, was used to identify cases. Case questionnaires were administered to collect information about food and environmental exposures. A case-control study with 16 matched case-control pairs was conducted to test the hypothesis of an association between raw whole almond consumption and infection. Almond samples were collected from case homes, retail outlets, and the implicated processor, and environmental samples were collected from processing equipment and associated farms for microbiological testing. One hundred sixty-eight laboratory-confirmed cases of SE PT30 infection (157 in Canada, 11 in the United States) were identified between October 2000 and July 2001. The case-control study identified raw whole almonds as the source of infection (odds ration, 21.1; 95% confidence interval, 3.6 to infinity). SE PT30 was detected in raw whole natural almonds collected from home, retail, distribution, and warehouse sources and from environmental swabs of processing equipment and associated farmers' orchards. The frequent and prolonged recovery of this specific organism from a large agricultural area was an unexpected finding and may indicate significant diffuse contamination on these farms. Identification of almonds as the source of a foodborne outbreak is a previously undocumented finding, leading to a North American recall of this product and a review of current industry practices.
PubMed ID
15690826 View in PubMed
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The association between neighborhood socioeconomic status and exposure to supermarkets and fast food outlets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159079
Source
Health Place. 2008 Dec;14(4):740-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Karen E Smoyer-Tomic
John C Spence
Kim D Raine
Carl Amrhein
Nairne Cameron
Vladimir Yasenovskiy
Nicoleta Cutumisu
Eric Hemphill
Julia Healy
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Delaware, 216 Pearson Hall, Newark, DE 19716, USA. ktomic@udel.edu
Source
Health Place. 2008 Dec;14(4):740-54
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Censuses
Continental Population Groups
Diet
Ethnic Groups
Food Industry
Humans
Obesity
Residence Characteristics
Restaurants
Social Class
Urban Population
Abstract
This study examines whether exposure to supermarkets and fast food outlets varies with neighborhood-level socioeconomic status in Edmonton, Canada. Only market area and fast food proximity predicted supermarket exposure. For fast food outlets, the odds of exposure were greater in areas with more Aboriginals, renters, lone parents, low-income households, and public transportation commuters; and lower in those with higher median income and dwelling value. Low wealth, renter-occupied, and lone parent neighborhoods had greater exposure to fast food outlets, which was not offset by better supermarket access. The implications are troubling for fast food consumption among lone parent families in light of growing obesity rates among children.
PubMed ID
18234537 View in PubMed
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Bill S-11-Safe Food for Canadians Act.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119490
Source
Health Law Can. 2012 Aug;33(1):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Lewis Retik
Author Affiliation
Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP, Ottawa.
Source
Health Law Can. 2012 Aug;33(1):4-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Safety
Humans
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
23097925 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(8):927-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Jari Valkonen
Author Affiliation
Kasvipatologian laboratorio PL 27, 00014 Helsingin yliopisto. jari.valkonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(8):927-34
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biotechnology - standards - trends
Finland
Food Industry - standards - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Plants, Edible
PubMed ID
15185505 View in PubMed
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121 records – page 1 of 13.