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21 records – page 1 of 3.

[Allergic reactions to peanuts and soya. The life-threatening/fatal cases can be prevented].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207896
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jul 23;94(30-31):2633-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-1997
Author
N I Kjellman
G. Hedlin
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för hälsa och miljö/pediatrik, Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jul 23;94(30-31):2633-4
Date
Jul-23-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arachis hypogaea
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Health education
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Soybean Oil
Soybeans
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
9273422 View in PubMed
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Allergy to banana in a 5-month-old infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58261
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2004 Jun;15(3):284-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Alvaro Moreno-Ancillo
Carmen Domínguez-Noche
Ana C Gil-Adrados
Pedro M Cosmes
Author Affiliation
Allergy Unit, Hospital Virgen del Puerto, Plasencia, Cáceres, Spain. alanaro@telefonic.net
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2004 Jun;15(3):284-5
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Infant
Male
Musa - adverse effects - immunology
Skin Tests
Urticaria - etiology
Abstract
Food proteins can sensitize the infants via different sources. A 5-month-old boy suffered three episodes of generalized urticaria 20 min after the ingestion of a fruit purée containing apple, banana and orange. Skin testing showed positive results to banana and chestnut. Other tests were negative. The value of specific immunoglobulin E (Pharmacia CAP-FEIA, Uppsala, Sweden) to banana was 58 KU/l, to orange was 9.7 KU/l, to chestnut was 5.6 KU/l and to latex was 1.6 KU/l. Orange, apple and latex products were well tolerated. He never had eaten chestnut. The parents rejected a banana challenge test. The route of sensitization in our case might be via placenta, breast-milk, and inadvertent oral intake of food or even via inhalation. An early frequent exposure to banana allergens was considered a possibility factor for the development of banana sensitization. We found that the banana consumption during pregnancy and lactation by the mother of our patient was greater than usual. It is not frequent to find so high levels of sensitization to any fruit in first year of life. In our case, latex, chestnut and orange sensitizations did not seem to be clinically relevant. However, latex and foods known to cross-react with banana antigens should be given to banana-sensitive individuals with great caution.
PubMed ID
15209965 View in PubMed
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Allergy to carmine red (E120) is not dependent on concurrent mite allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150985
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(2):179-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jussi Liippo
Kaija Lammintausta
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. jussi.liippo@utu.fi
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(2):179-83
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology
Angioedema - epidemiology - immunology
Animals
Carmine - adverse effects
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Additives - adverse effects
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Penaeidae - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Questionnaires
Skin Tests
Urticaria - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
Positive skin prick test (SPT) reactions to carmine red (E120) have been reported to occur concurrently with reactions to mites. The relationships between positive SPT reactions to carmine, carmine allergy and concurrent mite reactions are unknown. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of carmine sensitization and its clinical importance among patients with suspected allergy to food additives.
The occurrence of positive SPT reactions to mites was studied in 6,464 patients: 3,164 were tested with carmine and 2,837 with shrimp. Carmine ingestion-associated symptoms were registered at the time of testing. Patients with positive SPT to carmine received a follow-up questionnaire on their symptoms 1-5 years later.
Positive SPT reactions to carmine were seen in 94 patients (3.0%) of whom 74% also had positive SPT reactions to mites and 22% to shrimp. Carmine ingestion-associated symptoms were not dependent on concurrent mite reactivity in 39/94 (42%) patients.
Carmine sensitization without sensitization to mites is seen in one fourth of the patients. Allergic reactions to carmine are not dependent on concurrent reactivity to mites.
PubMed ID
19439984 View in PubMed
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An oral sensitization model in Brown Norway rats to screen for potential allergenicity of food proteins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57536
Source
Methods. 1999 Sep;19(1):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
L M Knippels
G F Houben
S. Spanhaak
A H Penninks
Author Affiliation
Department of Target Organ Toxicology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, AJ Zeist, 3700, The Netherlands. Knippels@voeding.tno.nl
Source
Methods. 1999 Sep;19(1):78-82
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Allergens - administration & dosage - toxicity
Animals
Antibodies - blood
Blood pressure
Cattle
Chickens
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Digestive System - immunology - physiopathology
Disease Models, Animal
Egg Proteins - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Humans
Immunization
Immunologic Techniques
Male
Milk Proteins - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology - toxicity
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
We developed an oral sensitization protocol for food proteins for the rat. Young Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to 1 mg ovalbumin (OVA) by daily gavage dosing for 42 days without the use of an adjuvant. OVA-specific IgE and IgG responses were determined by ELISA. On an oral challenge with OVA some clinical symptoms of food allergy-like effects on the respiratory system, blood pressure, and permeability of the gastrointestinal barrier were studied. In addition, BN rats were orally exposed to a total hen egg white protein (HEW) extract and cow's milk (CM) and the specificities of induced antibody responses were compared with the specificities of antibodies in sera from egg- and milk-allergic patients using immunoblotting. Animals orally exposed to the allergens developed specific IgE and IgG antibodies which recognized the same proteins compared with antibodies from egg- or CM-allergic patients. Among the various clinical symptoms of food allergy, gut permeability was increased after an oral challenge. In addition, some animals demonstrated a temporary decrease in breathing frequency or systolic blood pressure. The results obtained show that the Brown Norway rat is a suitable animal model for inducing specific IgG and IgE responses on daily intragastric dosing of OVA without the use of an adjuvant. Moreover, local immune-mediated effects on oral challenge are observed. The observation that enterally exposed BN rats and food-allergic patients demonstrate antibody responses to a comparable selection of proteins on exposure to different protein mixtures (HEW and CM) further supports the suitability of the BN rat as an animal model for food allergy research and for the study of the allergenicity of (novel) food proteins.
PubMed ID
10525441 View in PubMed
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[Appeal! Reports of adverse reactions of food are wanted!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75606
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Nov 10;90(45):3929
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1993

Chronic allergy to dietary ovalbumin induces lymphocyte migration to rat small intestinal mucosa that is inhibited by MAdCAM-1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61583
Source
Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2004 May;286(5):G702-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Toshiko Ogawa
Soichiro Miura
Yoshikazu Tsuzuki
Takashi Ogino
Ken Teramoto
Toshiaki Inamura
Chikako Watanabe
Ryota Hokari
Hiroshi Nagata
Hiromasa Ishii
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, Keio Univ., 35 Shinanomichi, Shijuku-Ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan.
Source
Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2004 May;286(5):G702-10
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies - analysis
Cell Adhesion Molecules - metabolism
Cell Movement
Chronic Disease
Diet
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Hypersensitivity, Delayed - etiology - immunology
Immunoglobulins - metabolism
Intestinal Mucosa - blood supply - physiopathology
Intestine, Small - blood supply - enzymology - pathology - physiopathology
Lymphocyte Subsets - pathology
Lymphocytes
Male
Microvilli
Mucoproteins - metabolism
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Peyer's Patches - blood supply
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serine Endopeptidases - metabolism
Venules - physiopathology
Abstract
Few models have described a chronic food allergy with morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa. Here we established an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced, cell-mediated, allergic rat model and examined lymphocyte migration in the gut. Brown Norway rats were intraperitoneally sensitized to OVA and then given 10 mg OVA/day by gastric intubation for 6 wk. Lymphocyte subsets and adhesion molecules were examined immunohistochemically, and the migration of T lymphocytes to microvessels of Peyer's patches and villus mucosa was observed by using an intravital microscope. Serum OVA-specific IgG and IgE levels were increased in animals repeatedly exposed to OVA. Significant villus atrophy and increased crypt depth was accompanied by increased infiltration of T lymphocytes in the small intestinal mucosa of the group given OVA. Expression of rat mast cell protease II and of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) was also increased in these groups. The administration of anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody significantly attenuated the OVA-induced changes in the mucosal architecture and in CD4 T lymphocyte infiltration. Intravital observation demonstrated that in rats with a chronic allergy, T lymphocytes significantly accumulated in villus microvessels as well as in Peyer's patches via a MAdCAM-1-dependent process. Our model of chronic food allergy revealed that lymphocyte migration was increased with MAdCAM-1 upregulation.
PubMed ID
14670821 View in PubMed
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Criteria for labelling infant formulas as "hypoallergenic". Allergy Section, Canadian Pediatric Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218591
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1994
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Mar 15;150(6):883-4, 887-8
Date
Mar-15-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology
Food Inspection - standards
Food Labeling - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - adverse effects
Pediatrics
Societies, Medical
Notes
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1971 Jan;29(1):1-75170581
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Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Oct;93(4):561-4568172
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Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1989 Jul;84(1):72-892754147
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Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Jan;118(1):71-41986102
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Jan;118(1):74-71986103
Cites: J Pediatr. 1991 Apr;118(4 Pt 1):520-52007924
Cites: Allergy. 1978 Feb;33(1):3-1477135
PubMed ID
8131121 View in PubMed
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Determination of protein allergenicity: studies in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75546
Source
Toxicol Lett. 2001 Mar 31;120(1-3):171-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2001
Author
A H Penninks
L M Knippels
Author Affiliation
Experimental Immunology, Division of Toxicology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research, P.O. Box 360, 3700 AJ, Zeist, The Netherlands.
Source
Toxicol Lett. 2001 Mar 31;120(1-3):171-80
Date
Mar-31-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibody formation
Disease Models, Animal
Egg Proteins - immunology
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology
Lactoglobulins - immunology
Male
Milk Proteins - immunology
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Abstract
For the safety evaluation of genetically engineered crops the potential allergenicity of the newly introduced protein(s) has become an important issue. There is, however, no universal and reliable test system for the evaluation of the allergenic potency of food products. The best known allergy assessment proposal is the careful stepwise process using the IFBC/ILSI decision tree. Unfortunately, the described tests are not always conclusive, especially if the gene source coding for the protein has no history of dietary use and/or an unknown history in terms of allergenicity. The further testing warranted should in particular be focused on the prediction of the sensitizing potential of the novel protein, for which animal models are considered to be needed. In this paper the results are summarized of a promising food allergy model developed in Brown Norway (BN) rats. The results demonstrate that BN rats can be sensitized orally to the various allergenic food proteins tested, resulting in significant antigen-specific IgE responses, without the use of adjuvants. Upon oral challenge of previously sensitized animals, local and systemic immune-mediated effects, such as increased gastrointestinal permeability and decreased breathing frequency and blood pressure, could also be observed.
PubMed ID
11323175 View in PubMed
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Early-life supplementation of vitamins A and D, in water-soluble form or in peanut oil, and allergic diseases during childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79480
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Dec;118(6):1299-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Kull Inger
Bergström Anna
Melén Erik
Lilja Gunnar
van Hage Marianne
Pershagen Göran
Wickman Magnus
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden. inger.kull@sll.se
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Dec;118(6):1299-304
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Antibody Specificity
Arachis hypogaea - immunology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - blood - etiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Plant Oils - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Vitamin A - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Water - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Early vitamin supplementation is given routinely to infants in many countries, but it is unclear whether this affects the risk of allergic diseases. OBJECTIVES: We sought to study the association between early-life supplementation of vitamins A and D in water-soluble form or in peanut oil and allergic diseases up to 4 years of age. METHODS: A prospective birth cohort of 4089 newborn infants was followed for 4 years using parental questionnaires repeatedly to collect information on exposure and health. At 4 years, the response rate was 90%, and allergen-specific IgE levels to food and airborne allergens were measured in 2614 of the participating children. RESULTS: Vitamins A and D were given to 98% of the children in infancy, and vitamins based in peanut oil dominated (90%). Children supplemented with vitamins A and D in water-soluble form during the first year of life had an almost 2-fold increased risk of asthma (adjusted odds ratio [OD], 2.18; 95% CI, 1.45-3.28), food hypersensitivity (adjusted OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.33-2.65), and sensitization to common food and airborne allergens (adjusted OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.34-2.64) at age 4 years compared with those receiving vitamins in peanut oil. No increased risk of IgE antibodies to peanut was seen in children receiving vitamins in peanut oil. CONCLUSION: Supplementation of vitamins A and D in water-soluble form seems to increase the risk of allergic disease up to the age of 4 years compared with supplementation with the same vitamins given in peanut oil. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Vitamins A and D in oil does not seem to increase the risk of allergic disease during childhood.
PubMed ID
17157660 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of patatin as a major cross-reactive allergen in latex-induced potato allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31227
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):613-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Mirko H H Schmidt
Monika Raulf-Heimsoth
Anton Posch
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Berufsgenossenschaften, Ruhr University, Department of Allergology/Immunology, Bochum, Germany. nsmis@neuro.hfh.edu
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2002 Dec;89(6):613-8
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - immunology - isolation & purification
Antibody Specificity
Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases - immunology - isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross Reactions
Dermatitis, Atopic - etiology - immunology
Epitopes - immunology
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Fruit - adverse effects
Health Personnel
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Latex Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology - immunology
Plant Proteins - immunology - isolation & purification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Skin Tests
Solanum tuberosum - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Potential cross-reactions between natural rubber latex and fruit/vegetable specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibodies have been reported for many years. This study was designed to investigate the molecular basis of acquired food sensitization focusing on the storage protein patatin and the patatin-like latex protein Hev b 7. OBJECTIVE: The amount of potato-specific IgE in the serum of latex-allergic health care workers and children with atopic dermatitis was determined to evaluate cross-reactivity between Hev b 7 and patatin. Additionally, the stability of potato patatin to digestion was investigated. METHODS: Human serum was tested on its reactivity to latex and potato proteins by IgE immunoblotting after one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D electrophoresis. Latex- and potato-specific IgE concentrations were measured in fluorescence enzyme immunoassays (CAP, Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden). Further, potato patatin was chromatographically isolated to perform auto-inhibition tests. Stability of patatin to degradation was determined by digestion in vitro. RESULTS: Patatin was identified as major cross-reactive potato allergen by N-terminal sequencing. Seventy-five percent of the potato-sensitized people reacted with patatin in 1-D immunoblots, and 25% of the positive reactions to Hev b 7 could be blocked by preincubation of the patients' sera with purified potato patatin. Examination of children with atopic dermatitis showed that most sera contained patatin-specific IgE, whereas no Hev b 7-specific IgE was detected. Finally, patatin has been found partially stable to digestion in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Patatin was identified as a major cross-reactive protein in latex-associated potato allergy and appears to be relevant for atopic dermatitis. Therefore, patatin could be a suitable marker for the determination of potato sensitization, and it may also constitute an important food allergen. Cross-reactivity between Hev b 7 and patatin was restricted to primarily latex-sensitized adults, suggesting a different mechanism of sensitization in children with atopic dermatitis.
PubMed ID
12487228 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.