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28 records – page 1 of 3.

[7 out of 10 satisfied with hospital food--is better, but not good enough].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143873
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Mar 31-Apr 13;107(13-14):926; discussion 926-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maria Wallhager
Catharina Elmsäter-Svärd
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Mar 31-Apr 13;107(13-14):926; discussion 926-7
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food - standards
Food Handling - standards
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Humans
Patient satisfaction
Sweden
PubMed ID
20432872 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 1990 Apr 6;65(14):106-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-6-1990

Application of hazard analysis and critical control point methodology and risk-based grading to consumer food safety surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121022
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Sep;75(9):1673-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Elin Halbach Røssvoll
Øydis Ueland
Therese Hagtvedt
Eivind Jacobsen
Randi Lavik
Solveig Langsrud
Author Affiliation
Nofima, Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research, Ås, Norway.
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 Sep;75(9):1673-90
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety
Decision Trees
Food - standards
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - standards
Food Microbiology
Food Safety
Humans
Norway
Risk assessment
Safety Management - standards
Abstract
Traditionally, consumer food safety survey responses have been classified as either "right" or "wrong" and food handling practices that are associated with high risk of infection have been treated in the same way as practices with lower risks. In this study, a risk-based method for consumer food safety surveys has been developed, and HACCP (hazard analysis and critical control point) methodology was used for selecting relevant questions. We conducted a nationally representative Web-based survey (n = 2,008), and to fit the self-reported answers we adjusted a risk-based grading system originally developed for observational studies. The results of the survey were analyzed both with the traditional "right" and "wrong" classification and with the risk-based grading system. The results using the two methods were very different. Only 5 of the 10 most frequent food handling violations were among the 10 practices associated with the highest risk. These 10 practices dealt with different aspects of heat treatment (lacking or insufficient), whereas the majority of the most frequent violations involved storing food at room temperature for too long. Use of the risk-based grading system for survey responses gave a more realistic picture of risks associated with domestic food handling practices. The method highlighted important violations and minor errors, which are performed by most people and are not associated with significant risk. Surveys built on a HACCP-based approach with risk-based grading will contribute to a better understanding of domestic food handling practices and will be of great value for targeted information and educational activities.
PubMed ID
22947476 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Dietetic Association Biotechnology Committee opinion paper on biotechnology and food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212684
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1995;56(2):63-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1995;56(2):63-7
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Biotechnology - standards
Canada
Consumer Advocacy - standards
Dietetics - standards
Food Handling - standards
Food Inspection - standards
Humans
Societies
Abstract
Biotechnology allows scientists to improve foods, create new food products and provide better tools to ensure food safety. It can assist in achieving the goal of an abundant, safe and nutritious food supply for a growing population. These technologies can lead to a greater variety of food with improved taste, nutrition and cooking quality. There are valid concerns about the widespread use of biotechnology which remain to be addressed by health, scientific and consumer constituencies. Dietitians need to be informed about biotechnology in food production and processing. They need to be aware of potential benefits and risks. Dietitians are uniquely positioned to inform the public about food safety and food products of biotechnology. Dietitians can discuss this information in understandable language and with sensitivity to public values. Dietitians should participate in the development of food-related policies at local, provincial and federal levels.
PubMed ID
10142851 View in PubMed
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Carcass quality in certified organic production compared with conventional livestock production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72188
Source
J Vet Med B Infect Dis Vet Public Health. 2000 Mar;47(2):111-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
I. Hansson
C. Hamilton
T. Ekman
K. Forslund
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Vet Med B Infect Dis Vet Public Health. 2000 Mar;47(2):111-20
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - microbiology - pathology
Comparative Study
Female
Food Handling - standards
Health Food - standards
Male
Meat - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - microbiology - pathology
Sweden
Swine
Swine Diseases - microbiology - pathology
Abstract
By studying carcass quality, expressed as affection, pathological findings, slaughter-weight and evaluation, a picture of an animal's health and potential as high quality food is achieved. This study compares the carcass quality in Swedish certified organic meat production with that of conventional meat production slaughtered during 1997. The study involves 3.9 million pigs, about 570,000 cattle and 190,000 sheep, all reared conventionally and 3483 pigs 4949 cattle and 4997 sheep reared according to organic standards. Pathological and additional findings are registered by meat inspectors from the Swedish National Food Administration at the post-mortem inspection. There was a significant difference at the post-mortem inspection of growing-fattening pigs; 28% of conventionally and 17% of the organically reared pigs had one or more registered lesion. The carcass evaluation of swine shows a higher meat percentage in conventional swine production. The total rate of registered abnormalities in cattle was systems around 28% from organic and 27% from conventionally reared herds. Carcass evaluation of cattle from organic herds gave higher classification in the EUROP system, whereas the fat content was lower than that of conventionally reared cattle. Sheep, reared both organically and conventionally, showed a lower rate of registered abnormalities than swine and cattle.
PubMed ID
10763380 View in PubMed
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[Concept of State policies of healthy nutrition. State of the sanitary epidemiological surveillance and measures of its perfection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190131
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(1):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

Consumer responses to communication about food risk management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160751
Source
Appetite. 2008 Mar-May;50(2-3):340-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heleen van Dijk
Julie Houghton
Ellen van Kleef
Ivo van der Lans
Gene Rowe
Lynn Frewer
Author Affiliation
Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen, The Netherlands. Heleen.vanDijk@wur.nl
Source
Appetite. 2008 Mar-May;50(2-3):340-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Consumer Product Safety
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - standards
Food, Genetically Modified
Germany
Great Britain
Greece
Humans
Legislation, Food
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mycotoxins - analysis
Norway
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Risk assessment
Risk Management
Abstract
Recent emphasis within policy circles has been on transparent communication with consumers about food risk management decisions and practices. As a consequence, it is important to develop best practice regarding communication with the public about how food risks are managed. In the current study, the provision of information about regulatory enforcement, proactive risk management, scientific uncertainty and risk variability were manipulated in an experiment designed to examine their impact on consumer perceptions of food risk management quality. In order to compare consumer reactions across different cases, three food hazards were selected (mycotoxins on organically grown food, pesticide residues, and a genetically modified potato). Data were collected from representative samples of consumers in Germany, Greece, Norway and the UK. Scores on the "perceived food risk management quality" scale were subjected to a repeated-measures mixed linear model. Analysis points to a number of important findings, including the existence of cultural variation regarding the impact of risk communication strategies-something which has obvious implications for pan-European risk communication approaches. For example, while communication of uncertainty had a positive impact in Germany, it had a negative impact in the UK and Norway. Results also indicate that food risk managers should inform the public about enforcement of safety laws when communicating scientific uncertainty associated with risks. This has implications for the coordination of risk communication strategies between risk assessment and risk management organizations.
PubMed ID
17945386 View in PubMed
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Contesting competence--change in the Danish food safety system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168316
Source
Appetite. 2006 Sep;47(2):143-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Annemette Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Centre for Advanced Food Studies, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 30, DK 1958 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark. anmn@kvl.dk
Source
Appetite. 2006 Sep;47(2):143-51
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety
Decision Trees
Denmark
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - standards
Food Inspection - methods - standards
Humans
Legislation, Food
Abstract
This paper presents the rationalisation and centralisation in the last decade in the Danish food safety system and illustrates some of the frustration it raised among market actors. The article argues that, even if the reforms did not change formal division of responsibilities for securing food safety, the implementation of new principles in the food safety control procedure in the form of HACCP and the publication of results from public food inspection visits (The Danish Smiley System) have altered the roles and responsibilities of market actors and public actors at a practical level. In this way the reform raises new questions about the efficiency of the food safety control system.
PubMed ID
16842886 View in PubMed
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Cronobacter spp. (Enterobacter sakazakii): advice, policy and research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150638
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Dec 31;136(2):238-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-2009
Author
Franco J Pagotto
Jeffrey M Farber
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Sir F.G. Banting Research Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Dec 31;136(2):238-45
Date
Dec-31-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Consumer Product Safety - standards
Enterobacteriaceae - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Enterobacteriaceae Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Food Contamination
Food Handling - standards
Food Microbiology
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Humans
Infant Formula - standards
Public Policy
Research - trends
Abstract
Although the number of reported cases of Cronobacter infection in Canada is low, Health Canada has been actively studying this organism since 1991. After reviewing the situation at the national level and due to health concerns with powdered formulae and its international trade, in 2003, Health Canada raised this issue at the international level by proposing to revise the Code of Practice for Powdered Formulae for Infants and Young Children at the Codex Alimentarius Committee of Food Hygiene. Canada volunteered to chair the Working Group that would be developing the Code, and the Code was completed in four years. The Code contributed to an improvement in the hygienic conditions in plants manufacturing Powdered Infant Formula (PIF), resulting in a lower level of product contamination with Cronobacter species. Canada has produced a document detailing Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) for Infant Formula in Canada. Health Canada uses the GMPs as a basis for assessing the manufacturing information received in pre-market notifications for new or changed infant formulas. Health Canada does not have microbiological criteria for Cronobacter spp. in PIF; however, we are currently working on developing these criteria. At present, there are no active or passive surveillance systems for Cronobacter spp. in Canada, although this has been discussed. Health Canada has recently adapted and condensed FAO/WHO guidelines to develop a draft guidance document for the hygienic preparation and handling of PIF in home and hospitals/care settings, which outline requirements for parents, caregivers, and staff in hospitals and day-care centres. Health Canada's Bureau of Microbial Hazards conducts research on the ecology, biology and pathogenesis of Cronobacter spp. Some of the research projects include specific aspects of molecular typing, virulence studies involving animal models, as well as in vitro tissue culture work to examine adhesion and invasion. Collaborative research is also being done with the Canadian National Research Council, using NMR and mass spectroscopy to reveal the structure of the O-polysaccharide of the various Cronobacter species. This review summarizes and discusses current activities that are being undertaken in Canada with respect to Cronobacter spp.
PubMed ID
19487040 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.