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92 records – page 1 of 10.

Are the alternatives to municipal waters truly safer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228029
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1990 Nov 3;16(44):223-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-1990
Author
L. Sekla
J. Drummond
D. Milley
W. Stackiw
D. Sargeant
J. Drew
J. Sisler
Author Affiliation
Cadham Provincial Laboratory, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1990 Nov 3;16(44):223-6
Date
Nov-3-1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Handling - methods - standards
Food Supply - standards
Humans
Manitoba
Water Microbiology - standards
Water Supply - standards
PubMed ID
2268878 View in PubMed
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Assessing the need for hot meals: a descriptive Meals on Wheels study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179479
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(2):90-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Karen Parsons
Caryn Rolls
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(2):90-2
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Consumer Product Safety
Food Handling - methods
Food Preferences
Food Services - standards
Humans
Needs Assessment
Quality Control
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
According to recent literature, delivering chilled Meals on Wheels to seniors increases food quality and safety. The purpose of this study was to determine the acceptability and/or feasibility of a cook-chill delivery system for participants in the Maimonides Geriatric Centre Meals on Wheels program in Montreal, Quebec. The authors also evaluated whether the meal was eaten upon delivery, documented where the meal was stored if consumption was delayed, determined what cooking/heating appliances were used and if the recipients were capable of heating up their meals, and assessed preferences for receiving chilled versus hot meals. Upon receiving the meal, 89% of the 60 seniors did not eat it immediately. Those who ate the meal later stored it in the refrigerator. All had some appliance available to heat the delivered meal; 55% used a microwave. Approximately 75% did not object to receiving meals chilled. The majority of recipients did not require delivery of hot meals, as most delayed consuming the meal until later in the day. Other meal-delivery program planners can use these findings when deciding if a cook-chill system is appropriate for their client populations.
PubMed ID
15217528 View in PubMed
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Bacterial flora and antimicrobial resistance in raw frozen cultured seafood imported to Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115815
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Mar;76(3):490-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Gazi M Noor Uddin
Marianne Halberg Larsen
Luca Guardabassi
Anders Dalsgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Mar;76(3):490-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Aquaculture
Bacteria - drug effects - growth & development
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Fishes - microbiology
Food Handling - methods
Frozen Foods - analysis - microbiology - standards
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Seafood - analysis - microbiology - standards
Abstract
Intensified aquaculture includes the use of antimicrobials for disease control. In contrast to the situation in livestock, Escherichia coli and enterococci are not part of the normal gastrointestinal flora of fish and shrimp and therefore not suitable indicators of antimicrobial resistance in seafood. In this study, the diversity and phenotypic characteristics of the bacterial flora in raw frozen cultured and wild-caught shrimp and fish were evaluated to identify potential indicators of antimicrobial resistance. The bacterial flora cultured on various agar media at different temperatures yielded total viable counts of 4.0 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(5) CFU g(-1). Bacterial diversity was indicated by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 84 isolates representing different colony types; 24 genera and 51 species were identified. Pseudomonas spp. (23% of isolates), Psychrobacter spp. (17%), Serratia spp. (13%), Exiguobacterium spp. (7%), Staphylococcus spp. (6%), and Micrococcus spp. (6%) dominated. Disk susceptibility testing of 39 bacterial isolates to 11 antimicrobials revealed resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, erythromycin, and third generation cephalosporins. Resistance to third generation cephalosporins was found in Pseudomonas, a genus naturally resistant to most ß-lactam antibiotics, and in Staphylococcus hominis. Half of the isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. Results indicate that identification of a single bacterial resistance indicator naturally present in seafood at point of harvest is unlikely. The bacterial flora found likely represents a processing rather than a raw fish flora because of repeated exposure of raw material to water during processing. Methods and appropriate indicators, such as quantitative PCR of resistance genes, are needed to determine how antimicrobials used in aquaculture affect resistance of bacteria in retailed products.
PubMed ID
23462087 View in PubMed
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Behavior of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Chouri├žo de Vinho, a dry fermented sausage made from wine-marinated meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114836
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
J García Díez
L. Patarata
Author Affiliation
Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Centre of Studies in Animal and Veterinary Science, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal.
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Fermentation
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology
Salmonella - growth & development
Staphylococcus aureus - growth & development
Abstract
Portuguese chouriço de vinho is made by drying coarsely minced meat and fat that has been previously marinated with wine (usually red), salt, and garlic for 1 to 2 days at a low temperature (4 to 8 °C). This procedure may improve the microbiological safety of the product. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of three pathogens in this product, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, to establish the minimum period of drying and maturation necessary to render safe products. The pathogens were inoculated in the chouriço de vinho batter. A factorial design was used to study the following variables in the fermentation process: (i) the presence or absence of an indigenous Lactobacillus sakei starter culture; (ii) the presence or absence of fermentable carbohydrates; and (iii) the salt level (1.5 or 3%). The samples were analyzed 24 h after the preparation of the batter (at stuffing); after 7, 15, and 30 days of drying; and after 30 days of storage at 4 °C under vacuum. Under all of the conditions studied, the levels of the three pathogens decreased during the drying period. In the early stages of drying, the addition of L. sakei starter culture and/or carbohydrates resulted in lower levels of gram-positive pathogens. After 15 days of drying, populations of all pathogens decreased by ca. 2 log in all samples. At that sampling time, L. monocytogenes was undetectable in the chouriço de vinho with L. sakei starter culture and carbohydrates. The mean count of S. aureus after 15 days of drying was below 1 log CFU/g. After 30 days of drying, no pathogens were detected. The drying period could be shortened to 15 days when considering only the gram-positive pathogens studied and the use of a starter culture and carbohydrates. Due to the low infective dose of Salmonella spp., the product should be considered safe after 30 days, when this pathogen became undetectable.
PubMed ID
23575119 View in PubMed
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Biological activity in traditional Alaska pollack sikhae during low temperature fermentation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75487
Source
Biofactors. 2004;22(1-4):319-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Yong-Jun Cha
Eun-Jeong Jeong
Hun Kim
Woo-Jin Cho
Gi-Jin Nam
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Nutrition, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773, South Korea. yjcha@changwon.ac.kr
Source
Biofactors. 2004;22(1-4):319-21
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Antioxidants - isolation & purification
Chitin - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Fermentation
Fishes
Food Handling - methods
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Oligosaccharides - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Temperature
Abstract
Biological activity was examined on Alaska pollack sikhae produced with 4 treatments (by irradiating at 5 or 10 kGy, or by adding either 0.1 or 0.3% of chitooligosaccharide), compared with control (2-step fermentation only) during fermentation at -2 degrees C. The extracts (500 ppm level) of sikhae had antimicrobial activities against 4 different strains of food poisoning bacteria such as Staphy. aureus, B. subtilis, B. cereus, and L. monocytogenes. Antioxidative activity (EDA(50), 11.55 mg/mL) in control group increased with time up to 60 days of fermentation but decreased thereafter, while those levels in other products were kept within 10.60-18.30 mg/mL ranges during fermentation. Inhibitory activity of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) (IC(50), 1.51-2.89 mg/mL) in all products was observed during fermentation except at 0 day. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase (XO) (IC(50), 0.65-0.87 mg/mL) in all products also increased with time up to 30 days of fermentation. Without irradiating or adding of chitooligosaccharide, Alaska pollack sikhae showing biological activities was enough by 2-step fermentation and storage at -2 degrees C only.
PubMed ID
15630304 View in PubMed
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Botulism and hot-smoked whitefish: a family cluster of type E botulism in France, September 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147131
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(45)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
L A King
T. Niskanen
M. Junnikkala
E. Moilanen
M. Lindstrom
H. Korkeala
T. Korhonen
M. Popoff
C. Mazuet
H. Callon
N. Pihier
F. Peloux
C. Ichai
H. Quintard
P. Dellamonica
E. Cua
M. Lasfargue
F. Pierre
H. de Valk
Author Affiliation
Institut de Veille Sanitaire (French National Institute for Public Health Surveillance), Saint Maurice, France. l.king@invs.sante.fr
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(45)
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Biological Assay
Botulism - epidemiology - transmission
Canada
Clostridium botulinum type E - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Finland
Food Handling - methods - standards
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging
Food Preservation
France - epidemiology
Humans
Mice
Middle Aged
Quadriplegia - etiology
Refrigeration
Salmonidae - microbiology
Temperature
Abstract
A family cluster of three cases of type E botulism were identified in south-east France in September 2009. The suspected food source of infection was a vacuum packed hot-smoked whitefish of Canadian origin purchased by the family during a visit to Finland and consumed several weeks later in France on the day prior to symptom onset. No leftover fish was available to confirm this hypothesis. Vacuum packed hot-smoked whitefish has previously been associated with cases of type E botulism in multiple countries, including Finland, Germany, the United States and Israel.
PubMed ID
19941787 View in PubMed
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Coliforms and prevalence of Escherichia coli and foodborne pathogens on minimally processed spinach in two packing plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152389
Source
J Food Prot. 2008 Dec;71(12):2398-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Sanja Ilic
Joseph Odomeru
Jeffrey T LeJeune
Author Affiliation
Food Animal Health Research Program, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio 44691, USA.
Source
J Food Prot. 2008 Dec;71(12):2398-403
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colony Count, Microbial
Enterobacteriaceae - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli O157 - isolation & purification
Food contamination - analysis
Food Handling - methods
Food-Processing Industry - standards
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Shigella - isolation & purification
Spinacia oleracea - microbiology
United States
Abstract
Minimally processed spinach has been recently associated with outbreaks of foodborne illnesses. This study investigated the effect of commercial minimal processing of spinach on the coliform and Escherichia coli counts and the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Shigella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes on two types of spinach before and after minimal processing. A total of 1,356 spinach samples (baby spinach, n = 574; savoy spinach, n = 782) were collected daily in two processing plants over a period of 14 months. Raw spinach originated from nine farms in the United States and three farms in Canada. Overall, the proportion of samples positive for coliforms increased from 53% before minimal processing to 79% after minimal processing (P 0.1) was observed. E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella spp. were not isolated from any of the samples. Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were isolated from 0.4 and 0.7% of samples, respectively. Results demonstrate that commercial minimal processing of spinach based on monitored chlorine washing and drying may not decrease microbial load on spinach leaves as expected. Further research is needed to identify the most appropriate measures to control food safety risk under commercial minimal processing of fresh vegetables.
PubMed ID
19244890 View in PubMed
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A common-source outbreak of trichinosis from consumption of bear meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185252
Source
J Environ Health. 2003 May;65(9):16-9, 24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Morton Nelson
Terry L Wright
Alan Pierce
Roger A Krogwold
Author Affiliation
Wright State University School of Medicine, Reibold Bldg., 117 S. Main St., Dayton, OH 45422-1280, USA. mnelson@chdmc.org
Source
J Environ Health. 2003 May;65(9):16-9, 24
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Child
Contact Tracing
Disease Outbreaks
Food Handling - methods
Humans
Male
Meat - parasitology
Middle Aged
Ohio - epidemiology
Ontario
Risk factors
Trichinella spiralis - isolation & purification
Trichinellosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Ursidae
Abstract
This paper discusses an outbreak of trichinosis that occurred in 1998 in Montgomery County, Ohio, and the investigation that followed. The outbreak was associated with consumption of bear meat from a hunt in Ontario, Canada. The person who had the index case had eaten two bear burgers that were cooked rare in a microwave oven. Bear meat from the same hunt later was consumed by 15 other people at a church supper and an additional 13 people who did not attend the supper. Of the 15 attendees at the church supper who ate the bear meat, seven developed illness consistent with Trichinella infection (attack rate about 47 percent). An additional seven people attended the supper but did not eat the bear meat and did not become ill. Having eaten bear meat at the church supper was associated with an increased risk of illness (p = .05). Inadequate cooking of the bear meat resulted in the transmission of live trichinae. The 13 other people who ate the bear meat but did not attend the supper reported no illness. A total of eight people, including the person with the index case, met the case definition for trichinosis. Adequate cooking of the bear meat or consumption of uninfected portions of the meat was probably the protective factor for those who did not become ill after consuming the bear meat.
PubMed ID
12762120 View in PubMed
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Comparison between genetic parameters of cheese yield and nutrient recovery or whey loss traits measured from individual model cheese-making methods or predicted from unprocessed bovine milk samples using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264482
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2014 Oct;97(10):6560-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
G. Bittante
A. Ferragina
C. Cipolat-Gotet
A. Cecchinato
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2014 Oct;97(10):6560-72
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Calibration
Caseins - analysis - genetics
Cattle
Cheese - analysis
Denmark
Dietary Fats - analysis
Female
Food Handling - methods
Linear Models
Milk - chemistry
Milk Proteins - analysis - genetics
Phenotype
Reproducibility of Results
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared - veterinary
Abstract
Cheese yield is an important technological trait in the dairy industry. The aim of this study was to infer the genetic parameters of some cheese yield-related traits predicted using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis and compare the results with those obtained using an individual model cheese-producing procedure. A total of 1,264 model cheeses were produced using 1,500-mL milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows, and individual measurements were taken for 10 traits: 3 cheese yield traits (fresh curd, curd total solids, and curd water as a percent of the weight of the processed milk), 4 milk nutrient recovery traits (fat, protein, total solids, and energy of the curd as a percent of the same nutrient in the processed milk), and 3 daily cheese production traits per cow (fresh curd, total solids, and water weight of the curd). Each unprocessed milk sample was analyzed using a MilkoScan FT6000 (Foss, Hillerød, Denmark) over the spectral range, from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber × cm(-1). The FTIR spectrum-based prediction models for the previously mentioned traits were developed using modified partial least-square regression. Cross-validation of the whole data set yielded coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation of 0.65 to 0.95 for all traits, except for the recovery of fat (0.41). A 3-fold external validation was also used, in which the available data were partitioned into 2 subsets: a training set (one-third of the herds) and a testing set (two-thirds). The training set was used to develop calibration equations, whereas the testing subsets were used for external validation of the calibration equations and to estimate the heritabilities and genetic correlations of the measured and FTIR-predicted phenotypes. The coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation results obtained from the training sets were very similar to those obtained from the whole data set, but the coefficient of determination of validation values for the external validation sets were much lower for all traits (0.30 to 0.73), and particularly for fat recovery (0.05 to 0.18), for the training sets compared with the full data set. For each testing subset, the (co)variance components for the measured and FTIR-predicted phenotypes were estimated using bivariate Bayesian analyses and linear models. The intraherd heritabilities for the predicted traits obtained from our internal cross-validation using the whole data set ranged from 0.085 for daily yield of curd solids to 0.576 for protein recovery, and were similar to those obtained from the measured traits (0.079 to 0.586, respectively). The heritabilities estimated from the testing data set used for external validation were more variable but similar (on average) to the corresponding values obtained from the whole data set. Moreover, the genetic correlations between the predicted and measured traits were high in general (0.791 to 0.996), and they were always higher than the corresponding phenotypic correlations (0.383 to 0.995), especially for the external validation subset. In conclusion, we herein report that application of the cross-validation technique to the whole data set tended to overestimate the predictive ability of FTIR spectra, give more precise phenotypic predictions than the calibrations obtained using smaller data sets, and yield genetic correlations similar to those obtained from the measured traits. Collectively, our findings indicate that FTIR predictions have the potential to be used as indicator traits for the rapid and inexpensive selection of dairy populations for improvement of cheese yield, milk nutrient recovery in curd, and daily cheese production per cow.
PubMed ID
25108864 View in PubMed
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92 records – page 1 of 10.