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Adherence to a traditional lifestyle affects food and nutrient intake among modern Swedish Sami.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147344
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
  1 document  
Author
Alastair B Ross
Asa Johansson
Veronika Vavruch-Nilsson
Sven Hassler
Per Sjölander
Anette Edin-Liljegren
Ulf Gyllensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Alastair.Ross@rdls.nestle.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Sep;68(4):372-85
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
372451
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Population Groups
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the nutrient and food intake of Sami still engaged in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle or reindeer-herding Sami [RS]) and Sami not involved in reindeer herding (industrialized lifestyle or non-reindeer-herding Sami [NRS]) with other northern Swedish populations.
Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden.
Data were used from a prospective cardiovascular intervention program in northern Sweden. Sami recruited into this study were divided according to whether they were involved in reindeer herding (traditional lifestyle, RS) (66 females, 79 males) or not (NRS) (255 females, 195 males), and compared to non-Sami from the same area taking part in the same study (controls) (499 females, 501 males). Subjects completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and clinical parameters were analysed.
RS had a higher overall intake of energy for both females (P
PubMed ID
19917189 View in PubMed
Documents
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Adherence to the Baltic Sea diet consumed in the Nordic countries is associated with lower abdominal obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124508
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
Noora Kanerva
Niina E Kaartinen
Ursula Schwab
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Männistö
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, FI-00270 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Baltic States
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Quality
Food Supply
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
North Sea
Nutrition Policy
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Abstract
Due to differences in food cultures, dietary quality measures, such as the Mediterranean Diet Score, may not be easily adopted by other countries. Recently, the Baltic Sea Diet Pyramid was developed to illustrate healthy choices for the diet consumed in the Nordic countries. We assessed whether the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) based on the Pyramid is associated with a decreased risk of obesity and abdominal obesity. The population-based cross-sectional study included 4720 Finns (25-74 years) from the National FINRISK 2007 study. Diet was assessed using a validated FFQ. The score included Nordic fruits and berries, vegetables, cereals, ratio of PUFA:SFA and trans-fatty acids, low-fat milk, fish, red and processed meat, total fat (percentage of energy), and alcohol. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured and BMI values were calculated. In a multivariable model, men in the highest v. lowest BSDS quintile were more likely to have normal WC (OR 0·48, 95 % CI 0·29, 0·80). In women, this association was similar but not significant (OR 0·65, 95 % CI 0·39, 1·09). The association appeared to be stronger in younger age groups (men: OR 0·23, 95 % CI 0·08, 0·62; women: OR 0·17, 95 % CI 0·05, 0·58) compared with older age groups. Nordic cereals and alcohol were found to be the most important BSDS components related to WC. No association was observed between the BSDS and BMI. The present study suggests that combination of Nordic foods, especially cereals and moderate alcohol consumption, is likely to be inversely associated with abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
22575060 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue triglyceride fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5130
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2005 Aug;181(2):353-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Joe McLaughlin
John Middaugh
Donald Boudreau
Gray Malcom
Steve Parry
Richard Tracy
William Newman
Author Affiliation
Epidemic Intelligence Service Program, Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. joe_mclaughlin@health.state.ak.us
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2005 Aug;181(2):353-62
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Aortic Diseases - ethnology - metabolism
Carotid Artery Diseases - ethnology - metabolism
Comparative Study
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - metabolism
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Triglycerides - metabolism
Abstract
Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega-3 family are believed to protect against cardiovascular disease. A rich source of omega-3 PUFA is found in fish and marine mammals (seal, walrus, whale), which are a large part of the traditional diet of Alaska Natives (Eskimo, American Indians, Aleuts), a group that has been reported to have a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease than non-Natives. An autopsy study using standardized methods to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, and analyses of stored triglyceride fatty acids was conducted in a sample of Alaska Native subjects and non-Native subjects living in Alaska. Findings indicate that Alaska Natives had less advanced atherosclerosis in coronary arteries, along with higher proportions of omega-3 and lower proportions of omega-6 PUFA in adipose tissue, than did non-Natives. We conclude that high dietary intake of omega-3 PUFA may account for the lower extent of coronary artery atherosclerosis, contributing to the reported lower heart disease mortality among Alaska Natives.
PubMed ID
16039290 View in PubMed
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Age-related variation in red blood cell stable isotope ratios (delta13C and delta15N) from two Yupik villages in southwest Alaska: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77980
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):31-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wilkinson Michael J
Yai Youlim
O'Brien Diane M
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks 99775-7000, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):31-41
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska
Biological Markers - blood
Carbon Isotopes - blood
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - analysis
Erythrocytes - radionuclide imaging
Female
Food Analysis - methods
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Preservation
Humans
Inuits
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Isotopes - blood
Pilot Projects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A significant fraction of the Alaska Native population appears to be shifting from a primarily subsistence-based diet to a market-based diet; therefore, the ability to link diet pattern to disease risk has become increasingly important to predicting public health needs. Our research aims to develop the use of stable isotope ratios as diet pattern biomarkers, based on naturally-occurring isotopic differences in the elemental composition of subsistence and non-subsistence foods. These differences are reflected in human blood, hair and fingernail isotope signatures. STUDY DESIGN: In this preliminary study, we investigate the potential for 13C and 15N to serve as dietary biomarkers for age-related dietary differences in a subset of participants involved with a long-term study initiated by the Center for Alaska Native Health Research (CANHR) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). METHODS: We measured delta13C and delta15N in red blood cells collected from 12 "elder" participants (age 60+ yrs) and 14 younger participants (age 14-19 yrs). Samples were evenly divided between males and females, and between two villages sampled in 2004. We also sampled market and subsistence foods in Fairbanks, AK, as an indicator of the isotopic differences likely to be observed in village foods. RESULTS: Elders were significantly enriched in 15N, but depleted in 13C, relative to younger participants. These differences are consistent with increased intake of marine subsistence in elders, and of certain market foods in younger participants. However, elders were considerably more variable in delta15N, suggesting greater differences among individuals in their usual intake. CONCLUSIONS: Overall we find that RBC stable isotope signatures exhibit variation consistent with previously documented dietary patterns in Alaska Natives, and we describe future directions for developing these biomarkers for diet pattern monitoring.
PubMed ID
17451132 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant intake, oxidative stress and inflammation among immigrant women from the Middle East living in Sweden: associations with cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84865
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Daryani Achraf
Basu Samar
Becker Wulf
Larsson Anders
Risérus Ulf
Author Affiliation
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. achraf.daryani@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Emigration and Immigration
F2-Isoprostanes - blood
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Immigrant women from the Middle East have higher cardiovascular risk compared to native women. Whether low antioxidant intake, oxidative stress or inflammation contributes to risk is unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 157 randomly selected foreign-born women (Iranian and Turkish) and native women living in Sweden, we investigated antioxidant status, oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes) and systemic inflammation (plasma high sensitive C-reactive protein; CRP) markers. We also investigated relationships between F(2)-isoprostanes, CRP and cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULT: Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls repeated four times. Micronutrient intake was not consistently different between groups. Serum alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol levels, was lower in Turkish vs. Swedish women (P0.21, P values
PubMed ID
17145175 View in PubMed
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Assessing dietary intake in a population undergoing a rapid transition in diet and lifestyle: the Arctic Inuit in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147869
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Sangita Sharma
Xia Cao
Cindy Roache
Annie Buchan
Rhonda Reid
Joel Gittelsohn
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, 1236 Lauhala Street, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. sangita_sharma@unc.edu
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-59
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Competency
Diet - ethnology - standards
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aims of the present study were to (1) characterise the diets of adult Inuit; (2) highlight foods for a nutritional and lifestyle intervention programme; (3) develop a quantitative FFQ (QFFQ) to evaluate the programme and monitor changes in dietary intake in this population over time. A dietary survey using single 24-h dietary recalls was conducted among Inuit aged between 19 and 87 years in two communities in Nunavut, Canada. Eighty-seven subjects completed the recalls (response rate was approximately 73 %). The mean energy intake for men and women was 9530 and 6939 kJ, respectively. The intakes of dietary fibre and the majority of vitamins and minerals (especially vitamins A, D, and E, total folate and Ca) were far below the recommendations. Traditional foods contributed 40 and 42 %, respectively, to protein and Fe intakes. Non-nutrient-dense store-bought foods were consumed much more frequently than the nutrient-dense traditional foods. Foods high in fat and sugar were highlighted, and will be replaced by healthier, more nutrient-dense alternatives to address the dietary inadequacies for the nutritional intervention programme. A 154-item QFFQ was developed and pilot tested in the Arctic Inuit. The present study highlighted foods to be targeted for a nutritional and lifestyle intervention programme not previously undertaken in this population. This QFFQ is culturally appropriate and specific for evaluating the effectiveness of the programme, as well as monitoring nutritional transition in this population.
PubMed ID
19840421 View in PubMed
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Associations between dietary factors and plasma lipids related to cardiovascular disease among Siberian Yupiks of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6084
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Oct;58(4):254-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
E D Nobmann
S O Ebbesson
R G White
L R Bulkow
C D Schraer
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Services, Alaska Area Native Health Service, Indian Health Service (IHS), Anchorage, USA. bnobmann@idm.cnchost.com
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Oct;58(4):254-71
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Animals
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - ethnology - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Seafood
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The diet of northern Native people has been postulated to protect against cardiovascular disease. We asked whether nutrient and food intakes of Eskimos were correlated with their plasma cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides and LDL-HDL ratio. Frequency of consumption of 91 foods among 64 Siberian Yupik adults was measured during home-based interviews. Intake of monounsaturated fat by men was negatively correlated with LDL. Foods and nutrients that contribute to the LDL-HDL ratio explained 42% of its variation among all subjects. Inclusion of the body mass index (BMI) explained 59% of the variation in the LDL-HDL ratio. Coefficients were negative for alpha-tocopherol, fresh bird, evaporated milk and cheese, and positive for BMI, syrup and pizza. BMI had a positive effect on the LDL-HDL ratio among younger adults, women and the entire sample, but did not contribute to explaining the variation among older adults or men. This emphasizes the importance of weight control among younger Siberian Yupik women. While coefficients were both positive and negative for traditional and western foods, the presence of traditional foods that were negatively correlated in the regression supports the hypothesis that consumption of traditional foods is important for maintaining cardiovascular health among Siberian Yupiks.
PubMed ID
10615831 View in PubMed
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Butter increased total and LDL cholesterol compared with olive oil but resulted in higher HDL cholesterol compared with a habitual diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267176
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Aug;102(2):309-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Sara Engel
Tine Tholstrup
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Aug;102(2):309-15
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Butter - adverse effects
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Plant Oils - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Butter is known to have a cholesterol-raising effect and, therefore, has often been included as a negative control in dietary studies, whereas the effect of moderate butter intake has not been elucidated to our knowledge.
We compared the effects of moderate butter intake, moderate olive oil intake, and a habitual diet on blood lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glucose, and insulin.
The study was a controlled, double-blinded, randomized 2 × 5-wk crossover dietary intervention study with a 14-d run-in period during which subjects consumed their habitual diets. The study included 47 healthy men and women (mean ± SD total cholesterol: 5.22 ± 0.90 mmol/L) who substituted a part of their habitual diets with 4.5% of energy from butter or refined olive oil.
Study subjects were 70% women with a mean age and body mass index (in kg/m²) of 40.4 y and 23.5, respectively. Butter intake increased total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol more than did olive oil intake (P
PubMed ID
26135349 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in an indigenous minority population. The All-Ireland Traveller Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130019
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1444-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Catherine McGorrian
Leslie Daly
Patricia Fitzpatrick
Ronnie G Moore
Jill Turner
Cecily C Kelleher
Author Affiliation
UCD School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. catherine.mcgorrian@ucd.ie
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1444-53
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - economics - ethnology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Censuses
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Minority Health - economics - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sedentary Lifestyle - ethnology
Smoking - ethnology
Social Class
Transients and Migrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The Traveller community are an indigenous minority group in Great Britain and Ireland who experience premature mortality. While minority populations worldwide are known to have high rates of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), Traveller CVD risk has not previously been defined.
All-Ireland cross-sectional census survey of the Traveller minority population (n?=?10,615 families).
A subsample of adult respondents completed a health survey (n?=?2023). CVD was defined as self-report of doctor-diagnosed heart attack, angina, or stroke. CVD risk factors and measures of social position were examined in the Traveller group using age-adjusted prevalence and prevalence ratios (PR). Comparisons were made with a general population sample of low socioeconomic status.
Age-adjusted prevalence of CVD in the Traveller population was 5.6% (95% CI 4.6-6.8), similar to that in the comparator population. Compared to those without CVD, Travellers with CVD had a higher prevalence of self-report of diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, current smoking, and a measure of distrust. Compared with the general population sample, Travellers had a higher prevalence of diabetes (adjusted PR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1-3.8) and lifestyle-related risk factors such as smoking (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4), fried food consumption (PR 2.8, 95% CI 2.4-3.2), and physical inactivity (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4).
This comprehensive census survey confirms CVD as an important health risk in the economically disadvantaged Irish Traveller community. Our findings add to the international knowledge base on minority populations and CVD risk.
PubMed ID
22042910 View in PubMed
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145 records – page 1 of 15.