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1767 records – page 1 of 177.

25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in maternal and cord blood at delivery and in maternal blood during lactation in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240391
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1984
Author
C. Lamberg-Allardt
M. Larjosto
E. Schultz
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Date
Jul-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cholecalciferol - administration & dosage
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lactation
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Seasons
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
The 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (25-OHD) in maternal and cord blood of 192 mothers was determined at delivery from June to the end of November. Ninety-nine mothers had received a daily supplementation of 12.5 micrograms of vitamin D during pregnancy and this group had a significantly higher 25-OHD concentration both in maternal and in cord blood than in the corresponding non-supplemented group. A daily supplement of 2.5 micrograms of vitamin D was given to 63 of the mothers during lactation. Of these mothers 44 were still lactating after 6 months. The dietary vitamin D intake of 31 mothers was calculated. We found a significant correlation between the maternal serum 25-OHD concentration 16-18 weeks after delivery and the total vitamin D intake. The intake (5.5 micrograms/d, including supplementation) was lower than that recommended for lactating mothers which is 10 micrograms/d (Food and Nutrition Board, 1980).
PubMed ID
6088438 View in PubMed
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1970 preventive dentistry program. Immediate and long-term results of a control program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6316
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):88-90
Publication Type
Article

The acceptability of isoflavones as a treatment of menopausal symptoms: a European survey among postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70456
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
C. Koebnick
M. Reimann
A. Carlsohn
S. Korzen-Bohr
S. Bügel
J. Hallund
L. Rossi
F. Branca
W. Hall
C. Williams
H-J F Zunft
K. O'Doherty Jensen
Author Affiliation
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Department of Intervention Studies, Nuthethal, Germany.
Source
Climacteric. 2005 Sep;8(3):230-42
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Isoflavones - therapeutic use
Life Style
Menopause
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Phytotherapy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate determinants of the acceptability of isoflavone products among postmenopausal women with regard to social and lifestyle factors, dietary habits, health concerns, food beliefs, menopausal symptoms and therapies, and to elucidate preferences for specific products. METHODS: A consumer survey was conducted among postmenopausal women in four European countries (Germany, Denmark, Italy and the UK), including a total of 465 respondents. RESULTS: The declared acceptability of isoflavones was highest in Germany (80%), followed by Italy (75%), the UK (59%) and Denmark (55%; p
PubMed ID
16390755 View in PubMed
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Achieving "proper" satiety in different social contexts--qualitative interpretations from a cross-disciplinary project, sociomaet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187281
Source
Appetite. 2002 Dec;39(3):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
S T Kristensen
L. Holm
A. Raben
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, 30 Rolighedsvej, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. stk@kvl.dk
Source
Appetite. 2002 Dec;39(3):207-15
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite - physiology
Body mass index
Culture
Denmark
Female
Food Habits - physiology - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Obesity - prevention & control
Satiation
Satiety Response - physiology
Social Behavior
Abstract
In nutritional research, the sensations of appetite have mostly been studied as a physiological phenomenon. However, in order to understand the significance of appetite for everyday eating habits, it is pertinent to include the social dimension. In a qualitative interview study, using qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews, we investigated how appetite was experienced and handled in the context of everyday life among 20 men and women. This report examines how qualitative dimensions of appetite are experienced and conceptualised in everyday life. Achieving what was described as proper satiety was found to be of decisive importance for daily eating habits. The experience of being full up, the duration of satiety and the sensuous pleasure of eating were all found to be central dimensions of proper satiety, the definition of which varied according to different social contexts. Whether one ate one's fill in the company of others, alone, at work or in one's spare time turned out to be of decisive importance. A more elaborate understanding of the social dimensions of appetite may help to improve endeavours to prevent overweight and obesity.
PubMed ID
12495694 View in PubMed
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Acquired preference especially for dietary fat and obesity: a study of weight-discordant monozygotic twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189641
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
A. Rissanen
P. Hakala
L. Lissner
C-E Mattlar
M. Koskenvuo
T. Rönnemaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To determine the independent associations of dietary preference for fat with obesity without the confounding by genetic effects.
Descriptive comparison of the responses of monozygotic twins discordant for obesity to questions concerning current and past preference for dietary fat, current overconsumption of fatty items and recalled food consumption compared to the co-twin.
The Research and Development Centre of the Social Insurance Institution, Finland.
Twenty-three healthy monozygotic twin pairs who were discordant for obesity (BMI difference at least 3 kg/m(2)).
Obesity status of the twin, as a function of the current and recalled dietary preferences and selected psychosocial variables.
The obese twins reported current preference for fatty foods three times more frequently than the lean co-twin. Moreover, when comparing recalled taste for fat at the time the twins left their parental homes, both the obese and lean co-twins consistently recalled that the obese twin had greater preference for fatty foods in young adulthood, and that the lean twin had less. Psychological characteristics of lean and obese co-twins did not differ.
Acquired preference for fatty foods is associated with obesity, independent of genetic background. Modification of fat preferences may be an important step in the prevention of obesity in the general population.
PubMed ID
12080452 View in PubMed
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[Acute morbidity and risk factors in Telemark 1870-1900].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183964
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-2003
Author
Asbjørn Storesund
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1130 Blindern, 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Date
Aug-14-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality - transmission
Disease Outbreaks - history
Food Habits
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - history - mortality
Health status
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Norway - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality
Risk factors
Sanitation - history
Abstract
In spite of methodological problems it has been concluded that Norwegian health statistics on acute morbidity in the late 19th century reflect genuine nation-wide health differences, a fact which calls for studies on living conditions in the areas concerned.
Data on morbidity have been extracted from the annual medical reports from seven health districts in Telemark between 1870 and 1900. The incidence of widespread contagious diseases in two selected groups is calculated.
Illness increased in Skien health district throughout the period, while in Kragerø it declined from about 1885. The occurrence of acute gastrointestinal infections was higher in Skien and Kragerø than in the five rural districts. Remotely located rural districts had fewer outbreaks of epidemic diseases than the more central districts.
High occurrence of acute infections appears to have been related to extensive migration and a high level of through traffic. High population density combined with poor sanitary conditions seems to be a main cause of acute gastrointestinal infections. No obvious connections were found between health status and standards of general hygiene, diet and economic boom periods. It has not been possible to document any evident effects of public health work an acute morbidity, a few diseases of minor importance disregarded.
PubMed ID
12934143 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire and nutrient database for Canadian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165732
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ilona Csizmadi
Lisa Kahle
Ruth Ullman
Ursula Dawe
Thea Palmer Zimmerman
Christine M Friedenreich
Heather Bryant
Amy F Subar
Author Affiliation
Division of Population Health and Information, Alberta Cancer Board, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N2. ilona.csizmadi@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jan;10(1):88-96
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Databases, Factual
Female
Food - classification
Food analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
Despite assumed similarities in Canadian and US dietary habits, some differences in food availability and nutrient fortification exist. Food-frequency questionnaires designed for the USA may therefore not provide the most accurate estimates of dietary intake in Canadian populations. Hence, we undertook to evaluate and modify the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and nutrient database.
Of the foods queried on the DHQ, those most likely to differ in nutrient composition were identified. Where possible these foods were matched to comparable foods in the Canadian Nutrient File. Nutrient values were examined and modified to reflect the Canadian content of minerals (calcium, iron, zinc) and vitamins (A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and B12). DHQs completed by 13 181 Alberta Cohort Study participants aged 35-69 years were analysed to estimate nutrient intakes using the original US and modified versions of the DHQ databases. Misclassification of intake for meeting the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) was determined following analysis with the US nutrient database.
Twenty-five per cent of 2411 foods deemed most likely to differ in nutrient profile were subsequently modified for folate, 11% for vitamin D, 10% for calcium and riboflavin, and between 7 and 10% for the remaining nutrients of interest. Misclassification with respect to meeting the DRI varied but was highest for folate (7%) and vitamin A (7%) among men, and for vitamin D (7%) among women over 50 years of age.
Errors in nutrient intake estimates owing to differences in food fortification between the USA and Canada can be reduced in Canadian populations by using nutrient databases that reflect Canadian fortification practices.
PubMed ID
17212847 View in PubMed
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The adaptive nature of implementation practice: case study of a school-based nutrition education intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115493
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2013 Aug;39:10-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Sherri Bisset
Louise Potvin
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Centre de recherche Léa-Roback sur les inégalités sociales de santé de Montréal & IRSPUM, Université de Montréal Public Health Research Institute, Québec, Canada. Sherri.Bisset@criucpq.ulaval.ca
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2013 Aug;39:10-8
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cooking
Food Habits
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Plan Implementation - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Models, Psychological
Organizational Case Studies
Poverty
Psychology, Social
Quebec
Schools
Abstract
To describe how and why nutritionists implement and strategize particular program operations across school contexts.
Instrumental case study with empirical propositions from Actor-Network Theory (ANT). Data derived from interviews with interventionists and observations of their practices.
Seven primary schools from disadvantaged Montreal neighborhoods.
Six nutritionists implementing the nutrition intervention in grades 4 and 5. From 133 nutrition workshops held in 2005/06, 31 workshops were observed with audio-recordings.
Little Cooks--Parental Networks aims to promote healthy eating behaviors through engagement in food preparation and promotion of nutrition knowledge.
The program-context interface where interventionists' practices form interactively within a given social context.
Coding inspired by ANT. Interview analysis involved construction of collective implementation strategies. Observations and audio-recordings were used to qualify and quantify nutritionists' practices against variations in implementation.
Nutritionists privileged intervention strategies according to particularities of the setting. Some such variation was accounted for by school-level social conditions, individual preferences and nutritionists' past experiences.
Implementation practices are strategic and aim to engage educational actors to achieve intervention goals. These results challenge implementation frameworks centered on purely technical considerations that exclude the social and interpretive nature of practice.
PubMed ID
23501242 View in PubMed
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Addressing poor nutrition to promote heart health: moving upstream.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140561
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kim D Raine
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kim.raine@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diet therapy - prevention & control
Cereals
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Evidence-Based Medicine
Fatty acids
Fishes
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Nuts
Obesity - diet therapy - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Vegetables
Abstract
Current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention suggest dietary patterns that promote achieving healthy weight, emphasize vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, fish and nuts, substituting mono-unsaturated fats for saturated fats and restricting dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg/day. However, trends in nutrient intake and food consumption patterns suggest that the need for improvement in the dietary patterns of Canadians is clear. Influencing eating behaviour requires more than addressing nutrition knowledge and perceptions of healthy eating - it requires tackling the context within which individuals make choices. A comprehensive approach to improving nutrition includes traditional downstream strategies such as counselling to improve knowledge and skills; midstream strategies such as using the media to change social norms; and upstream strategies such as creating supportive environments through public policy including regulatory measures. While the evidence base for more upstream strategies continues to grow, key examples of comprehensive approaches to population change provide a call to action.
Notes
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11 Suppl 9:S755-812656679
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2001 Sep 28;50(RR-16):1-1511594724
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):432-515727972
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Apr 16;330(7496):898-90015831879
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S8-14, S8-1516042158
Cites: Health Rep. 2006 Aug;17(3):9-2516981483
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2007 Jun;22(3):414-2416982650
Cites: Health Rep. 2007 May;18(2):47-5217578015
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):497-118548148
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Jul 22;118(4):428-6418591433
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):Suppl I20-619263979
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Apr 13;169(7):659-6919364995
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-9819417859
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2009 Jul 24;58(RR-7):1-2619629029
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-7919812802
Cites: Health Psychol. 2000 Jan;19(1 Suppl):76-8310709951
Cites: Obes Rev. 2005 Feb;6(1):23-3315655036
PubMed ID
20847988 View in PubMed
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1767 records – page 1 of 177.