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110 records – page 1 of 11.

137 Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256245
Source
Health Phys. 1971 Jun;20(6):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971

An epidemiologic assessment of exposure of children to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a Toronto community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230302
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Sep-Oct;80(5):325-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
B A Yaffe
B A Reeder
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Sep-Oct;80(5):325-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aroclors - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Food Contamination
Humans
Industrial Waste - analysis
Lipids - blood
Ontario
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
In 1985, the human exposure from a site of PCB (Aroclor 1260) contamination in a Toronto community was assessed. The primary source of potential exposure was soil. Extensive surface soil sampling revealed levels greater than expected (geometric mean level = 0.19 ppm). Children under age 6 were considered to be at greatest risk of exposure as they may absorb PCBs from ingested soil or skin contact. A sample of children aged 1-5 was recruited from the community (n = 30) and from a socio-demographically similar control area (n = 23) that had significantly lower but detectable soil PCB levels (geometric mean level = 0.12 ppm). Exposure to PCBs from breastfeeding, food consumption, contact with soil, and parental occupation was comparable in the two groups. Geometric mean blood PCB levels did not differ significantly between the study (1.5 ppb) and control (1.9 ppb) group. Levels ranged up to 5 ppb in both groups and are comparable to those described in children elsewhere in North America.
PubMed ID
2509058 View in PubMed
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Assessment of current exposure levels in different population groups of the Kola Peninsula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190682
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2002;60(1-2):235-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
I G Travnikova
V N Shutov
G Ya Bruk
M I Balonov
L. Skuterud
P. Strand
Ju A Pogorely
T F Burkova
Author Affiliation
Research Institute ol Radiation Hygiene, St Petersburg, Russia. irina@it6293.spb.edu
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2002;60(1-2):235-48
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bryopsida
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Food Contamination
Fungi
Humans
Lichens
Meat
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Reindeer
Risk assessment
Seasons
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Abstract
Activity concentrations of 137Cs and 90Sr in samples of vegetation and natural food products collected in the Kola Peninsula in 1998 and 1999 indicate a very slow decrease in contamination levels during the last decade, mainly due to the physical decay of the radionuclides. The activity concentrations of 137Cs in reindeer meat decreased with a half-life of about 9 years. 137Cs in lichen, moss and fungi is significantly higher than in natural vegetation (grasses) and agricultural plants (potatoes). The activity concentrations of 137Cs in reindeer meat were two orders of magnitude higher than those in locally produced beef and pork. Consumption of reindeer meat, fish, mushrooms and berries constituted the main contribution to the internal dose from 137Cs and 90Sr for reindeer-breeders in the Lovozero area. The estimated committed doses due to 137Cs intake in this group were about 10 microSv per month in summer 1998 and 15 microSv per month in winter, 1999. There was good agreement between internal dose estimates based on intake assessment and whole body measurements. The population of Umba settlement, which is not involved in reindeer breeding, received individual committed doses due to 137Cs intake of about 0.5 microSv per month, about a factor of 20 less than the reindeer-breeders in Lovozero. In this case, the main contribution to the internal dose of the general population came from consumption the of 137Cs in mushrooms and forest berries. The contribution of 90Sr to the internal dose varied from 1% to 5% in the different population groups studied.
PubMed ID
11936611 View in PubMed
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Assessment of human exposure to chemical contaminants in foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221939
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1993 Jan-Feb;10(1):5-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
H B Conacher
J. Mes
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Health & Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1993 Jan-Feb;10(1):5-15
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cadmium - administration & dosage - analysis
Canada
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Food analysis
Food Contamination
Humans
Lead - administration & dosage - analysis
Mercury - administration & dosage - analysis
Milk, human - chemistry
Pesticides - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Abstract
One of the most important factors in assessing risk to human health from potentially harmful chemicals in foods is the availability of good data on the exposure of the public to such substances. The means of acquiring these data generally involves monitoring programmes using appropriate sampling procedures and reliable analytical methods for measuring the compounds of concern in a variety of substrates. Two approaches are generally employed: a biological monitoring programme which measures substances in human fluids and tissues, and a food analysis monitoring programme, preferably a total diet study, wherein food is prepared for consumption prior to analysis. The choice of approach to use and chemicals to monitor depend on the situation within a particular country. The analysis of food has the advantage of short term impact since problems can be identified relatively quickly and control measures established. Biological monitoring on the other hand tends to indicate both accumulated and current exposure from all sources, including air, water and food. In Canada both approaches have been used for a number of years with major surveys of human milk and adipose tissue, and the total diet study, being conducted approximately every five years. Details of these programmes together with some of the pertinent findings are presented.
PubMed ID
8504874 View in PubMed
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Brominated flame retardant concentrations in sera from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) from 2007 to 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106100
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Feb;63:26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Dorothea F K Rawn
J Jake Ryan
Amy R Sadler
Wing-Fung Sun
Dorcas Weber
Patrick Laffey
Douglas Haines
Kristin Macey
Jay Van Oostdam
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Sir Frederick Banting Research Centre, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Address Locator: 2203C, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada. Electronic address: thea.rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca.
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Feb;63:26-34
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Flame Retardants - analysis
Food Contamination
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Brominated - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Young Adult
Abstract
Pooling of surplus serum from individual samples, collected between 2007 and 2009 during Cycle 1 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), was performed to develop a national baseline estimate of brominated flame retardants in Canadians. Serum samples were categorized by sex and distributed by five age groups ranging from 6 to 79years. Nearly 5000 (4583) serum samples were used to form 59 composite pools. Serum pools were created to ensure a high detection frequency of these analytes in serum because low volume samples had previously resulted in non-detectable concentrations. The analytes of interest in these serum pools included 23 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) isomers (a-, ß- and ?-HBCD). PBDEs were observed in all samples tested and total PBDE concentrations ranged from 27ngg(-1) lipid to 130ngg(-1) lipid (geometric mean [GM] 46ngg(-1) lipid). ?PBDE concentrations were significantly elevated in samples representing the 6-11year old age group (GM 65ngg(-1) lipid) relative to ages above 40years, although no difference in concentration was observed between the sexes. PBDE concentrations in Canadian sera from the general population were higher than reported in Europe and Asia, but a little lower than observed in the US. PBDE 47 was the greatest contributor to ?PBDE concentrations and the GM concentration for this congener was 22ngg(-1) lipid. The other dominant contributors to ?PBDE concentrations were in descending order: 153 [GM 9.4ngg(-1) lipid]>99 [GM 4.6ngg(-1) lipid]?100 [GM 4.1ngg(-1) lipid]>209 [GM 1.1ngg(-1) lipid] and 183 [GM 0.42ngg(-1) lipid]. ?HBCD was detected in all samples analysed, although most samples were observed at concentrations
PubMed ID
24246239 View in PubMed
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Bush food contamination and public health policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227712
Source
Pages 699-703 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
699 BUSH FOOD CONTAMINATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY Charles Dumont and Thomas Kosatsky Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, Chisasibi, Quebec, Canada INTRODUCTION In the past 15 years there has been publicity in the scientific and native communities to the effect that
  1 document  
Author
C. Dumont
T. Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, Chisasibi, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pages 699-703 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Food Contamination
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American
Methylmercury Compounds
Public Health
Quebec
PubMed ID
1365273 View in PubMed
Documents
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Cadmium levels in kidneys from Swedish pigs in relation to environmental factors--temporal and spatial trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206329
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1997 Dec 3;208(1-2):111-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-1997
Author
K P Grawé
T. Thierfelder
L. Jorhem
A. Oskarsson
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. kipe@slv.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1997 Dec 3;208(1-2):111-22
Date
Dec-3-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Cadmium - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Environmental Exposure
Food Contamination
Humans
Kidney - chemistry
Public Health
Sweden
Swine - metabolism
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
The kidney cadmium level in pigs slaughtered at the age of 5-7 months was analysed with respect to geographical and temporal trends. During the period 1984-1992, a total of 1051 samples of porcine kidney from 31 abattoirs were analysed for cadmium at the National Food Administration within the control programme for livestock production. The mean kidney cadmium level was 0.11 +/- 0.07 mg/kg wet wt. (mean +/- S.D.). Regression analysis showed that the cadmium concentration in pig kidney has increased by 2% per year. By using Geographic Information System (GIS), geographical trends in cadmium concentration of porcine kidney were analysed and correlated to cadmium levels in moss and pH in the mor layer of podsolized soil. These two parameters explained 60% of the random variation in cadmium levels in porcine kidney. There were significant differences between individual abattoirs, but no significant longitudinal or latitudinal trend was found. Variation in kidney cadmium levels within breeding stocks was investigated. Kidneys from eight stocks, with five pigs from each, were analysed for cadmium concentration. In spite of the homogeneous treatment of the pig within the same stock, kidney cadmium levels varied on average by a factor of two between individuals. There was a significant correlation between cadmium in feed and cadmium levels in porcine kidney (P = 0.002). The temporal increase in cadmium levels in porcine kidney should be further investigated. An increase in cadmium body burden in pig may be an indicator of an increase in human cadmium exposure.
PubMed ID
9496655 View in PubMed
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Cesium-137 in Alaskan lichens, caribou and Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111309
Source
Health Phys. 1967 Apr;13(4):383-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1967
Author
W C Hanson
Source
Health Phys. 1967 Apr;13(4):383-9
Date
Apr-1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Cesium isotopes
Environmental Exposure
Food contamination, radioactive
Humans
Inuits
Lichens - radiation effects
Male
Meat
Radiation Effects
Radioactive fallout
Seasonal periodicity
Anaktuvuk Pass
Food chain
Diet, traditional
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 828.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 126.
PubMed ID
6029683 View in PubMed
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[Cesium-137 residues in food and in persons in areas severely contaminated by the Chernobyl power station accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35666
Source
Nippon Koshu Eisei Zasshi. 1994 Sep;41(9):920-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
K. Takano
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene, Shinshu University School of Medicine.
Source
Nippon Koshu Eisei Zasshi. 1994 Sep;41(9):920-5
Date
Sep-1994
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Child
Drug Residues
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure
Food contamination, radioactive
Humans
Power Plants
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
On April 26, 1986, the fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station, in the Ukraine, of the former Soviet Union, exploded. Since March in 1991, a group including the author has been performed medical surveys and provided assistance centered mainly in Gomel district of the Republic of Belarus, which contains many severely contaminated areas due to fallout. Ultra sound scanning was performed by the Shinshu University School of Medicine Second Department of surgery on thyroid glands of children in Chechersk region, of Gomel. Twenty-one persons, each with tuberculous echogenic dots in their thyroid glands, were brought to Japan for further examination. The 137Cs residue was measured in these 21 persons, using a whole-body counter (WBC). Subsequently 137Cs was also measured in a range of food items found in the city in which they live. These studies indicate that, although the children live in the same area, differences in life style and in food intake are reflected in the amount of cesium residue in their bodies.
PubMed ID
7949290 View in PubMed
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110 records – page 1 of 11.