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12 records – page 1 of 2.

An Outbreak of toxoplasmosis in pregnant women in northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1640
Source
Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1990 Apr; 161(4):769-774.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J C McDonald
T W Gyorkos
B. Alberton
J D MacLean
G. Richer
D. Juranek
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1990 Apr; 161(4):769-774.
Date
1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Kuujjuaq
Toxoplasma gondii
Epidemics
Zoonosis
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Animals, Wild
Antibodies, Protozoan - analysis
Arctic Regions
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Meat
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Reindeer
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seals, Earless
Toxoplasmosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
An ongoing screening program for toxoplasmosis identified a cluster of four women from northern Qu�?�©bec who, over a 4-month period, seroconverted during their pregnancy. An epidemiologic investigation was carried out in an attempt to identify the source of this infection. All potential risk factors were assessed by a questionnaire administered to 22 Inuit women who had delivered babies in the previous year. Seroconversion was significantly associated with skinning of animals for fur (P = .015) and frequent consumption of caribou meat (P = .034). Compared to seronegative women, women who were seropositive were more than four times more likely to have eaten dried seal meat (P = .067), more than six times more likely to have eaten seal liver (P = .064), and more than eight times more likely to have consumed raw caribou meat more than once per week (P = .054). These observations have contributed to the development of guidelines for the prevention of toxoplasmosis in seronegative pregnant women in this arctic region.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2126.
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Assessment of PCBs in arctic foods and diets. A pilot study in Broughton Island, Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1333
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Kinloch, D.
Kuhnlein, H.
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare (Canada)
Source
Pages 159-162 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Broughton Island
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet, traditional
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Food Supply
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant feeding
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Nutrition Surveys
PCB
Pilot Projects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Pregnancy
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 880.
PubMed ID
3152417 View in PubMed
Documents
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Brucellosis in an Inuit child, probably related to caribou meat consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature487
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1989; 21(3):337-338.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
Chan, J.
Baxter, C.
Wenman, W.M.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1989; 21(3):337-338.
Date
1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Spence Bay
Zoonosis
Diet, traditional
Animals
Brucellosis - drug therapy - etiology
Canada
Child
Drug Therapy, Combination
Food Contamination
Gentamicins - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Meat - adverse effects
Reindeer
Tetracycline - administration & dosage
Abstract
A 9-year-old Inuit boy with brucellosis is presented. The most likely source of his infection was contaminated caribou meat. Brucella suis is enzootic in Canadian caribou herds and this case indicates that natives of the Arctic are a risk group for acquiring brucellosis through the ingestion of raw caribou meat.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1863.
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First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study: Results from British Columbia, 2008-2009

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100783
Publication Type
Report
Date
2011
  1 website  
Author
Assembly of First Nations
Université de Montréal
University of Northern British Columbia
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Food contaminant analyses
Food sampling
Food security
Hair sampling
Mercury
Metals
Nutrient intake
Traditional food use
Water sampling
Abstract
It is anticipated that information collected by this project will be useful for First Nations communities and health professionals in the development of dietary advice and food guidance for First Nations at the regional level. Also, data on background exposures to persistent organic pollutants, trace metals, pesticides, and pharmaceutical products is essential for First Nations in developing a baseline for future studies. This study, called the First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study (FNFNES), is being implemented region by region over a 10-year period, which started in British Columbia in 2008, in partnership with 21 randomly selected First Nations on-reserve communities. The BC regional study was implemented over a two-year period ending in 2010, and its findings are summarized in this report.
Online Resources
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Food-borne botulism in Canada, 1971-84.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1061
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1985 Dec 1; 133(11):1141-1146.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
Hauschild, A.H.
Gauvreau, L.
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare (Canada)
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1985 Dec 1; 133(11):1141-1146.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Clostridium botulinum
Diet, traditional
Immunizations
Antitoxin
Animals
Botulism - epidemiology
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Fishes
Food Contamination
Food Microbiology
Food Preservation
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Meat
Reindeer
Risk
Seals, Earless
Abstract
Sixty-one outbreaks of food-borne botulism involving a total of 122 cases, of which 21 were fatal, were recorded from 1971 to 1984 in Canada. Most occurred in northern Quebec, the Northwest Territories or British Columbia. Of the 122 victims 113 were native people, mostly Inuit. Most of the outbreaks (59%) were caused by raw, parboiled or "fermented" meats from marine mammals; fermented salmon eggs or fish accounted for 23% of the outbreaks. Three outbreaks were attributed to home-preserved foods, and one outbreak was attributed to a commercial product. The causative Clostridium botulinum type was determined in 58 of the outbreaks: the predominant type was E (in 52 outbreaks), followed by B (in 4) and A (in 2). Renewed educational efforts combined with a comprehensive immunization program would significantly improve the control of botulism in high-risk populations.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1843.
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Human exposure as a monitor of environmental contamination: its possibilities and limitations as illustrated by the case of methylmercury in northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227710
Source
Pages 712-714 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
T. Kosatsky
C. Dumont
Author Affiliation
Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pages 712-714 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollution
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Mercury - analysis
Methylmercury Compounds
Middle Aged
Quebec
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
PubMed ID
1365278 View in PubMed
Documents
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The occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of salmonellae isolated from commercially available canine raw food diets in three Canadian cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155044
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2008 Oct;55(8-10):462-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
R. Finley
R. Reid-Smith
C. Ribble
M. Popa
M. Vandermeer
J. Aramini
Author Affiliation
Center for Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. rita_finley@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2008 Oct;55(8-10):462-9
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - microbiology
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Colony Count, Microbial
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Dogs
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Public Health
Risk factors
Salmonella - drug effects - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - transmission
Treatment Outcome
Zoonoses
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolated from commercially available canine raw food diets in Canada. A total of 166 commercial frozen raw food diet samples were purchased from randomly selected local pet stores in three Canadian cities for a period of 8 months. All samples were evaluated for the presence of Salmonella, serotyped and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. There was an overall Salmonella prevalence of 21%; chicken was an ingredient for 67% of the Salmonella-positive diets. Eighteen different Salmonella serotypes were recovered, and resistance was observed to 12 of the 16 antimicrobials tested, with the majority of Ontario isolates exhibiting resistance to ampicillin and Calgary isolates to tetracycline. This study demonstrates the potential risk of raw food diets, especially for immunocompromised individuals, and stresses the need for implementing regulatory guidelines for the production of these diets in order to help control and ideally eliminate the bacterial risks associated with their use and consumption.
PubMed ID
18811907 View in PubMed
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Polonium-210 content of human tissues in relation to dietary habit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104020
Source
Science. 1966 May 27;152(3726):1261-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966 May 27
Author
Hill CR
Source
Science. 1966 May 27;152(3726):1261-2
Date
1966 May 27
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Artiodactyla
Canada
Cesium isotopes
Female
Food contamination, radioactive
Great Britain
Humans
Meat
Placenta
Polonium
Pregnancy
Radiometry
Abstract
Abstract Concentrations of polonium-210, a natural fallout nuclide, in human placentas collected in northern Canada ranged up to 27.8 picocuries per 100 grains, or 80 times the average United Kingdom value. High levels are related to the inclusion of reindeer or caribou meat in the diet, and a correlation exists between the eoncentrations of polonium-210 and cesium-137 in the placentas.
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Mar 19;94(12):590-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
19 Mar 1966
  1 website  
Author
Bird PM
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Mar 19;94(12):590-8
Date
19 Mar 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood
Canada
Cattle
Cesium isotopes
Food contamination, radioactive
Humans
Milk
Strontium Isotopes
Urine
Abstract
Levels of strontium-90 and cesium-137 in Canadian milk during the period 1960-64 were consistently higher than those in the United States or the United Kingdom, but levels in humans, while also higher, did not reflect the differences observed in milk. Annual dose rates of 27 millirads to bone and 4 millirads to the whole body correspond to the highest average concentrations of strontium-90 and cesium-137 so far observed. Levels of cesium-137 in the urine of residents of the Canadian North were found to increase with the increasing consumption of caribou or reindeer. Whole body counting of a few northern residents showed cesium-137 levels as high as 1000 nanocuries. It is concluded that protective actions are not needed but that studies in the North should be emphasized to provide a better basis for evaluating that particular situation.
Online Resources
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Radionuclides in the lichen-caribou-human food chain near uranium mining operations in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20969
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 1999 Jul;107(7):527-537
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
  1 website  
Author
Thomas, PA
Gates, TE
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. thomasp@sask.usask.ca
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 1999 Jul;107(7):527-537
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food chain
Food contamination, radioactive
Gamma Rays
Humans
Lichens - metabolism
Male
Mining
Radiation Dosage
Radioisotopes - analysis
Reindeer - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
The richest uranium ore bodies ever discovered (Cigar Lake and McArthur River) are presently under development in northeastern Saskatchewan. This subarctic region is also home to several operating uranium mines and aboriginal communities, partly dependent upon caribou for subsistence. Because of concerns over mining impacts and the efficient transfer of airborne radionuclides through the lichen-caribou-human food chain, radionuclides were analyzed in tissues from 18 barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus). Radionuclides included uranium (U), radium (226Ra), lead (210Pb), and polonium (210Po) from the uranium decay series; the fission product (137Cs) from fallout; and naturally occurring potassium (40K). Natural background radiation doses average 2-4 mSv/year from cosmic rays, external gamma rays, radon inhalation, and ingestion of food items. The ingestion of 210Po and 137Cs when caribou are consumed adds to these background doses. The dose increment was 0.85 mSv/year for adults who consumed 100 g of caribou meat per day and up to 1.7 mSv/year if one liver and 10 kidneys per year were also consumed. We discuss the cancer risk from these doses. Concentration ratios (CRs), relating caribou tissues to lichens or rumen (stomach) contents, were calculated to estimate food chain transfer. The CRs for caribou muscle ranged from 1 to 16% for U, 6 to 25% for 226Ra, 1 to 2% for 210Pb, 6 to 26% for 210Po, 260 to 370% for 137Cs, and 76 to 130% for 40K, with 137Cs biomagnifying by a factor of 3-4. These CRs are useful in predicting caribou meat concentrations from the lichens, measured in monitoring programs, for the future evaluation of uranium mining impacts on this critical food chain.
PubMed ID
10378999 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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12 records – page 1 of 2.